Vinaykumar07
Human Resource
Leolingham2000
Management Consultant
Paladin
Hr Consultant
Bus2perf
Director
Himmath
Hr, Consulting, Business Strategies, Employee

Dear all,
My one small querry is like this. How to motivate the old employee to get the work more than what he is performing? As we are aware that after certain age, human comes on saturation stage. Just they pass the time in place of using his more experience. They will come on duty on schedule time and will leave the working place on or before schedule time. So keeping in mind of such situation, as a HR what measures we should adpot? Kindly share ur veiws or ur expertise.
Thanks & Regards
Sidheshwar
Bangalore
9844586572
14th April 2006 From India, Bangalore
Sidhesh,
Just wait for their Reirement! Ok Jokes apart.
You have the answer, practice this:
Do you have an aged person at hime akin to your old employees, either your dad, or grand parents. If they are happy with you and listen to you ?How do you do that ? Don't we say, dadaji please have your medicines, when he says, no you say, atleast for the sake of children.Also say, We(children) want your presence always, you are our moral support, guidance,light,etc... You teach/taught us respect,values, ethics, etc.
Sidhesh, There's no situation in corporate/work life which cannot be replicated at domestic side. Tlk to the old employees more personally about their children. Ask them what do they do. Where can you help the in terms of education, career, etc. This bonds them with youngsters.
Hey, watch 'Munna Bhai MBBS' scene where he hugs the housekeeper/sweeper. Have you noticed the motivation the sweeper had after Sanjay Dutt hugs him. He swept the floor again and again.
Enjoy HR!
15th April 2006 From India
Sidhesh:

Is the "old employee" performing adequately, at the level of his/her peers? What measures do you use?

What is the accuracy/quality/results of his/her work? Equal to, above or below peers? What is the basis of your judgement?

How does the rest of the group treat him/her, as an experienced resource to be appreciated, nurtured and utilized to the fullest, or as someone who has reached the "saturation stage" and left to his/her own devices to "muddle through"? Have you included him/her into the mainstream - planning sessions, projects, other activities where there is interaction with peers?

How often does the supervisor just "have a chat" with the employee - talk about the job challenges, interests and opportunities?

How many other (younger) employees "come on duty at schedule time and leave on or before schedule time"? Is such activity condoned? What measures are taken to prevent it?

Don't condescend to older workers because they look and act like your parents. Treat them as you would any other employees and you will find that they will respond.

Someday you will be in that position; how would you want your peers and superiors to motivate you?

Bill Kuzmin

PALADIN Human Resource Consulting
15th April 2006 From United States,
FOCUS ON PERFORMANCE ,AND NOT PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS.

================================================== ============================

*** Age is not the problem. The problem is communication. Many supervisors /line managers from the baby-boom generation have a hard time dealing with older workers, either because of unfortunate stereotypes about aging or because they're uncomfortable talking to older people about job performance. Workforce is maturing, and it's becoming increasingly important to leave old-fashioned ideas about age behind. Supervisors /line managers can bring out the best in older workers by looking beyond stereotypes, communicating openly about individual strengths and weaknesses, and providing ongoing challenges.

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DON'T LET STEREOTYPES FOOL YOU Age alone is a poor indicator of a person's capability. Health and mental agility depend largely upon living conditions and heredity. They vary tremendously among people of the same age. Nevertheless, older workers are frequently stereotyped as difficult to instruct, stubborn about change, frequently absent due to illness, and inclined to coast through their last few years on the job. Numerous surveys, however, indicate that these beliefs are generally unfair or misleading. In reality, older workers have a lower absence rate than their juniors, and they're as receptive to training as any other group of workers. In addition, older employees show greater loyalty to their employers and more satisfaction with their jobs than their younger counterparts do. Although older employees may require special attention during training [SEE THE SPECIAL APPROACH TO TRAINING FOR ELDERS SHOWN BELOW ], they are far more likely to remain with the company that trains them than are younger workers, who frequently take their training with them to new jobs elsewhere. Instead of labeling ELDERS as a coasting old worker you can't do anything about, you should take a closer look. Elders have plenty of enthusiasm you could tap, and probably a few weaknesses you could help to work on. The key is to supervise elders as an individual, not a stereotype.

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SAVE STEWING FOR POTATOES Although older workers often have many valuable abilities, telepathy usually isn't one of them. Elders have no way of knowing why the supervisor / line manager is dissatisfied with their work, because they havn't discussed it with them. YOU could start by talking with ELDERS about THEIR job in a positive, non-threatening way. YOU could begin the conversation by emphasizing Elder's good qualities: reliability, knowledge of the work, cheerfulness, and so on. "You have a lot to offer,". "And I want to make sure we're taking full advantage of your talents . . . . Are we?" The point is to discuss performance with older workers as openly as with any other employees. Give them a chance to get involved in setting goals and standards. Then help them achieve these standards with frequent feedback and coaching. Don't be embarrassed about asking older workers for advice. They've worked in the same job for a long time, they understand how things really get done and are familiar with the cycles and seasonal patterns that affect operations. Respecting their knowledge--and drawing on it--will not only motivate older workers, but also help you make better decisions.

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CHALLENGE WITH CHANGES Many older workers would welcome a change in their responsibilities, especially if they've been doing the same thing for a long time. A new challenge could bring them new life. For example, older workers' experience and knowledge of the organization make them ideal for training others. The resulting interaction between these "old hands" and younger workers will benefit both the individuals and the organization. Older workers can also make outstanding mentors for new employees. They offer plenty of savvy and can frequently provide guidance that's unclouded by personal ambition. Probably the best way for younger supervisors /LINE MANAGERS to get past the stereotypes that hinder their effective use of older workers is to get to know those employees as individuals. After all, stereotypes usually fade away in the light of reality.

================================================== =====

LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT ---INSTRUCTIONAL CONCERNS

Adapting Instruction to suit "older" learners.

** Organizational factors

*Arrange for training periods of about 60 to 90 minutes duration.

* Make instruction purposeful and job‑related.

* Mix young and old in the same instructional group.

*Match instructors to learners, and learners to instructors.

*Respect adult status and experience.

* Give strong emotional support and encouragement.

** Instructional factors

*Use discovery methods of learning.

*Arrange for longer orientation sessions.

*Restrict the range and content of lessons to essentials.

* Demonstrate the whole, then the parts, and then the whole again.

*Use written instructions rather than verbal ones for projects and assignments.

*Avoid audiovisual aids that use a different logic or sequence.

*Avoid formal tests and examinations.

* Use continuous assessment.

*Vary instructional methods and work assignments.

*Provide variety.

** Leaming factors

*Reduce the need for verbal information, and for memorization.

*Avoid abstract and irre'levant information.

*Employ a great deal of practice, review, and consolidation, so that overlearning takes place.

*Reduce interference and distractions.

*Insure that material is meaningful and relevant.

** Personal factors

•Allow learners to participate in the planning process.

•Avoid any sense of competition.

•Allow learners to proceed at their own pace.

*Encourage learners to set their own goals, and to beat their own targets.

*Make sure that learners feel a sense of achievement and recognition.

*See that learners learn correctly from the start.

•Promote group feelings and identity.

================================================== ==========

WHAT YOU COULD DO WITH YOUR EMPLOYEES,

ESPECIALLY THE ELDERS.

1. Promote employee involvement.

Employees of all ages generally like the feeling of involvement.

2. Provide regular feedback.

Annual performance appraisals alone do not cut it. To be effective, employee feedback needs to be frequent and constructive. Acknowledge your employees’ achievements (catch your employees doing something right) .

3. Offer training opportunities.

Today, employees typically consider employer-sponsored training to be a welcomed, valuable opportunity

4.Provide on-the-job coaching.

Coaching is recognized as the critical difference in employee success

5.Offer flexibility.

The key is to help employees of all generations balance job requirements with personal obligations. Demonstrating flexibility, while focusing on goals and accountability, can go a long way toward inspiring loyalty in these employees. Work may come first, but it doesn’t supercede the rest of employees’ lives

6.Provide a challenging work environment.

Elder employees are most motivated by the work itself. There are job redesign strategies available to help renew employees’ interest and re-kindle enthusiasm. New tasks, new projects and new responsibilities can all help make your employees’ jobs more challenging.

7.Cultivate an atmosphere of respect.

Employees of every generation don’t respond well to feeling like just another number, a cog in the wheel, or an invisible part of the organization. All employees need to feel their efforts are recognized and genuinely appreciated. Respect your employees’ needs, acknowledge their individuality and provide fair opportunities. Make your employees feel valued .

8.The start of the day is a great time to demonstrate high levels of enthusiasm for the new workday. Go out of your way to greet your employees. Deliver compliments early in the day to put your employees in a positive frame of mind as they face their day.

9. Give your employees lots of opportunities to see you frequently throughout the day. Walk around the company with your head high and a smile on your face. Avoid hiding out in your office doing paperwork for hours at a time. If your employees don't see you during the day, they can feel ignored or (worse yet) demoralized.

10. Celebrate victories. Set small and attainable goals every few weeks or months to give your employees tasks worth striving toward. Don't wait until you complete a big project to congratulate the people who were involved. It's easy to bring in a cake and some soft drinks to reward outstanding performances for a job well done.

11. Encourage order. Every few months, give your employees two or three hours to clean their desks, their files, and do minor computer repairs. If you let them know you care about their working conditions and their stress levels, they'll be more dedicated to producing top quality work.

12. When the afternoon slump hits (around 3:00 p.m.), take a walk around the office and ask people, "How's it going?" This is a time when everyone needs a quick lift and they'll appreciate your care and concern.

13. Create a locked suggestion box and periodically review the contents. Let your employees know you're concerned about their well being by addressing their issues. Post the suggestions by sending out an e-mail newsletter or tacking them up on a bulletin board.

14. Offer incentives for your employees to show them you care about them. Allow them time off to volunteer for community projects your company supports if they produce quality work. Offer flex time to those qualified people who need it for personal reasons (a sick child, a semester of extra education, etc.). Create special privileges for those who excel at projects or quotas (ball-game tickets, restaurant coupons, theater tickets).

15. Encourage friendships among co-workers. People want to have friends at work, yet many are too busy or too shy to know how to go about it. Encourage interaction by giving your employees the chance to share their talents with other employees within your office.

16. Hide your anger. If an employee does something that provokes your anger, instead of blowing up at them, let that person know you're disappointed in his or her behavior and never criticize them as a person. That's the difference between a good critique and criticism. Most people can learn from a well-thought-out critique yet all people hate being criticized.

17. Show your humanity. Everyone loves a person with a good sense of humor. You don't need to tell jokes, but learn to laugh out loud easily and often.

18. Let go of any negative opinions you may have about your employees. Approach each of them as a source of unique knowledge with something valuable to contribute to your company. Remember that you're co-creating the achievement of a vision with them.

19. Make sure your employees have everything they need to do their jobs. Remember when you started a new school year and you'd prepare by getting all new school supplies? Why not build just such an opportunity into your department by simply asking each staff member, "Do you have everything you need to be as competent performer as you can be?"

20. Clearly communicate what's expected of employees, what the company values and vision are, and how the company defines success. Employees can't perform well or be productive if they don't clearly know what it is they're there to do and the part they play in the overall success of the company. Be sure to communicate your expectations--and to do it often.

21. Get to know your employees, especially their goals, their stressors, what excites them and how they each define success.

22. Make sure they're trained--and retrained--in problem solving and conflict resolution skills. These critical skills will help them interact better with you, their co-workers, customers and suppliers. It's common knowlede --better communication reduces stress and increases positive outcomes.

23. Constantly ask how you're doing in your employees' eye. Be sure to accept feedback graciously and express appreciation.

24. Pay attention to company stories and rituals.

25. Reward and recognize employees in ways that are meaningful to them. This is another reason why getting to know your employees is so important. Remember to celebrate both accomplishments and efforts to give employees working on long-term goals a boost.

26. Be consistent for the long haul. If you start an engagement initiative and then drop it, your efforts will backfire, creating employee estrangement. STAY CLOSE TO MAJOR ASSIGNMENTS.

27. Identifying the Signs of Burnout

What are the signs of a lack of motivation or burnout? One of the key red flag symptoms is a decrease in performance or productivity. This is especially obvious when comparing an individual's past performance with current performance. Absent any serious reasons to explain away the change, de-motivation is usually the culprit. This leads us to the next red flag: an increase in the number of days missed. If you're in the midst of the flu season and a number of other employees call in sick, then ignore this absence. However, if someone who's rarely sick starts to miss work, then the likelihood is that de-motivation is the germ.

Here are more signals you need to be looking for and must begin to address:

Attitude changes. The EMPLOYEE is usually up-beat, but now appears quiet, somber, sullen, disagreeable or even moody. Or the reverse--the employee becomes far more outgoing, energized or talkative than normal, typical or acceptable.

Comments from co-workers that "something is wrong."

Stress reactions. The job isn't being completed as well as in the past; the employee is jittery, short-tempered or difficult to get along with.

Tardiness. The employee is arriving late in the morning and leaving early or at the exact end of the workday or shift.

Change in lunch and coffee breaks. The employee takes more time than usual or doesn't take them at all.

Decrease in positive interaction with other employees. He "just doesn't get along" as well with others anymore.

Increase in errors.

Decrease in productivity. There's an oncrease in time spent on projects without a subsequent increase in quality or productivity.

Okay, you've now seen eight symptoms of burning out or unmotivated behavior and attitudes. Observation is the first step. So what else can you do to move the employee along and assist him or her in the process of self-motivation? The first thing you should do is gather information AND then take an appropriate action.

WHAT ELDER EMPLOYEES SEEK

1.Interesting work. No one wants to do the same boring job over and over, day after day. And while any job will always require some boring, repetitive tasks, everyone should have at least a part of their job be of high interest to them.

2.Information. Information is power, and employees want to be empowered with the information they need to know to do their jobs better and more effectively. And, more than ever, employees want to know how they are doing in their jobs and how the company is doing in its business. Open the channels of communication in an organization to allow employees to be informed, ask questions, and share information.

3.Involvement. Managers today are faced with an incredible number of opportunities and problems and, as the speed of business continues to increase dramatically, the amount of time that they have to make decisions continues to decrease. Involving employees in decision making, especially when the decisions affect them directly, is both respectful and practical. Those closest to the problem typically have the best insight as to what to do. As you involve others, you increase their commitment and ease in implementing new ideas or change.

4.Independence. Few employees want their every action to be closely monitored. Most employees appreciate having the flexibility to do their jobs as they see fit. Giving people latitude increases the chance that they will perform as you desire - and bring additional initiative, ideas, and energy to their jobs.

5.Increased visibility. Everyone appreciates getting credit when it is due. Occasions to share the successes of employees with others are almost limitless. Giving employees new opportunities to perform, learn, and grow as a form of recognition and thanks is highly motivating for most people.

hope this is useful to you

REGARDS

LEO LINGHAM
17th April 2006 From India, Mumbai
Hi LEO,
Very much thank you. You have given very good knowledge to me. Realy I appreciate you the way you have explained the things.
Don't mind. I am siting one example of older worker. A supervisor age is 30 years and worker age is 52 years. They are in electrical project business. As per supervision, supervisor found that aged person is not following guidlines what he is giving as per company policy. During conversation with both, it is learnt that aged person told to supervisor that you are like my child so don't teach me. I know how to perform the work. Don't compare me with other. U do ur work and I am doing my work. But supervisor feels that he is not following the channel of commands. He made complaint to HR dept agiant his work behaviour. Now as a HR, What should we do?
Pls provide better solution.
Thanks & Regards
Sidheshwar
Bangalore, India
9844586572
17th April 2006 From India, Bangalore
Based on your brief,

-this situation is not uncommon. It happens in many companies and countries.

-it is clear there is communication gap, due to lack of understanding of the

respective role.

-job titles often don't represent the roles,it needs to be explained /defined.

PEOPLE PERCEIVE AMBIGUITIES IN THE RESPECTIVE ROLES.

==================================================

IN SUCH CASES, THERE IS NO BLACK/WHITE POSITIONING,

THERE ARE GREY AREAS, THAT IS WHAT YOU HAVE TO

DEAL WITH

================================================== ==

FIRST, let us look at the supervisor,

-his role is to get the job done, using the people reporting to him.

-has the supervisor been trained in ''people management skills''

-has the supervisor the interpersonal skills in dealing with different

personalities

-does the supervisor delegate tasks or passes instructions at every

moment.

-has the supervisor conducted performance appraisal

if so, what the reviews/results

-does the supervisor issue verbal instructions or written instructions.

OFTEN , IT IS NOT WHAT THE SUPERVISOR SAYS,

BUT HOW HE SAYS.

PEOPLE ARE INDIVIDUALS / DIFFERENT, SUPERVISOR

MUST ADAPT DIFFERENT APPROACH TO DIFFERENT

PEOPLE , AND NOT JUST BLAND UNIFORM APPROACH.

================================================

SECOND, Now look at the employee,

-his length of experience

-has he been overlooked or lacks the competence for promotion

-what his performance reviews / gaps [ in any ]

-his attitude [ state of mind]

-his personal problems affecting his behavior

-his seniority is being respected or not

-what about his involvement in decision making

etc etc

-================================================

AS AN 'HR ' INITIATIVE, YOU SHOULD

-discuss the issues with both individually, and reduce

the gap narrower.

-then bring both together and discuss an acceptable/

accommodative solution.

IT MUST BE A WIN-WIN SOLUTION.

AND NOT A WIN-LOSE SOLUTION.

===========================================

OFFER TRAINING IN PEOPLE MANAGEMENT FOR THE SUPERVISOR

AND

MENTORING FOR THE ''OLD EMPLOYEE''.

======================================

AND ALSO A WARNING ,

that if a misbehavior is repeated more than twice,

an appropriate action would be taken.

-TRANFER

-TERMINATION

AT THE END OF THE DAY, THE SUPERVISOR RULES

AND THAT POSITION MUST BE RESPECTED.

============================================

I have taken a broad / general approach , because

-I have not met the persons

-I have no knowledge of their personalities/ behavior patterns

etc

REGARDS

LEO LINGHAM
18th April 2006 From India, Mumbai
Dear LEO
Good Morning,
Thank you very much.
Let I site another example of older person.
** He is 10th pass candidate
** His age is 52 yrs
** Initialy he joined as trainess in mechanical job
** He got gud experience and expertise in mechanical job
** He desrves to become mechanical engineer
** He approached to senoir for promotion
** Senoir refused to promote him bze of less education
** Company policy allows only diploma holder for engineer post
** Now he is demotivated
** Organisation is need of this person
** But this person is now showing reluctancy behavoiur
** Now he is not producing results like earlier based on performance appraisal but he is not under the company standard. His performance is as per company standard. But output is lower than earlier.
NOW YOU SUGGEST ME, AS A HR WHAT WE SHOULD DO?
Thanks & Regards
Sidheshwar
18th April 2006 From India, Bangalore
It’s difficult to add to Leo’s excellent list of practical tips for engaging older workers, so I won’t try.
I will make one comment though on Leo’s “Learning And Development ---Instructional Concerns”. Most (if not all) of Leo’s excellent comments relate equally to all age workers, not just to older workers. Leo’s points relate to general adult learning principles.
I’d like to just summarize the key principles in engaging older workers:
Show flexibility in their work arrangements.
Set mutually agreed goals.
Provide open and honest feedback.
Promote rewards (extrinsic and intrinsic) for good performance.
Give extra responsibility and challenge.
Involve workers in decision-making.
Clarify roles and expectations.
Show how their work fits into the big picture.
Respect their experience and use as coaches/mentors.
Get to know workers on a personal level.
Vicki Heath
Director
Business Performance Pty Ltd
http://www.businessperform.com
20th April 2006 From Australia, Melbourne
NOW, THIS IS A CLASSICAL EXAMPLE OF MANAGING

BY EXCEPTION.

The position of this person

-is understandable.

-his performance standard was acceptable, but not rewarded.

WHY CONDUCT PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL , IF

NO ACTION IS BEING TAKEN.

-the company wants him.

-the company management is under the impression that this

person will not quit, for various reasons.

-but the company management seems to have forgotten

that this person is human and hence will hit back in his own way.

THE COMPANY WILL SUFFER.

====================================

IN SUCH CASES, THE MANAGEMENT MUST

-come out of the square

-get their head out of the sand

-NOT HIDE UNDER THE COMPANY POLICIES.

AFTER ALL THE COMPANY POLICIES ARE GUIDELINES,

WHICH HELPS THE COMPANY TO MOVE FORWARD.

MAKE THOSE EXCEPTIONAL DECISIONS , REQUIRED

IN THE INTEREST OF THE COMPANY.

HERE BOLD DECISIONS ARE REQUIRED.

1.POLICY OF CALLING THE PERSON HOLDING DEGREE/

DIPLOMAS AS ENGINEERS, NOT OTHERS WHO ARE PERFORMING

ENGINEERING WORKLOAD , IS AN ANCIENT CRAP.

I know several people in FORD / BOEING/ 3M who have no formal

qualifications in engg. are engineers by profession.

-offer this person some useful titles like

*engineering specialist

*development specialist

*engineering service specialist

etc

THESE ARE SOME EXAMPLES, YOU CAN DEVICE YOUR OWN

SINCE YOU ARE CLOSE TO THE GAME.

==============================================

2. IF his performance is excellent , why not give him

-SPECIAL MERIT INCREMENT.

======================================

3. Recognize his contribution by making token awards

========================================

4.Appreciate / reward his long service to the company.

THIS PERSON IS BASICALLY SEEKING

A RECOGNITION FOR HIS CONTRIBUTION

TO THE COMPANY.

regards

LEO LINGHAM
20th April 2006 From India, Mumbai
Hi
there is not a fixed formulae to motivate any old aged man- he may be old but u need to find his oriention in terms of work, behavioural aspectsa nd being HR u can easily make out the weak spots of any individual. try to foucs on this weak spots and see people are motivated to do anything.
Don't be reactive - be practive interms of his reactions towrds u r interventions to motivate him.
I guess best way to motivate old people will be instead of saying ask their suggestion based on thir exp. and make them do the work - requires behavioural tactics.
Regards
Vinay
9866254387
20th April 2006 From India, Hyderabad
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