Leolingham2000
Management Consultant
Zsk85
Student
Sush1972
Sales Professional

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Dear Friends,
I wanted to have some infomation on Strategic Planning in Recruitment for an organisation which has huge expansion plans in India. If anyone of you have been involved in strategy planning or have knowledge on it, could you please foward me some info?
Looking fowad for your reply.
With Best Regards
Sushil S Modi

An effective recruitment strategy and model underpins the success of the organisation’s ability to acquire the best talent.

It assists clients to identify, design and implement the best recruitment strategies to meet their organisational needs. By understanding the underlying business and recruitment objectives we can achieve an effective recruitment model for the organisation.

It works with clients to consider:

» Optimisation of the existing workforce

» The desired and most cost effective workforce mix of permanent versus contract and temporary staff

» Recruitment model cost benefit analysis

» Existing and proposed technology enablers

Recruitment models and strategies can be used in varying ways - insourced, outsourced, stand-alone or combination. This may include the use of:

» Recruitment centres – insourced or outsourced

» Exclusive supplier arrangements

» Preferred supplier panels

» Master vendors

» Managing vendors

» Unbundled recruitment services, so you implement only what you need

Benefits

Strategic Recruitment Planning

» Ability to select a recruitment model that will improve the quality of your present and future workforce

» Establishes structure and framework around how you achieve your recruitment objectives

» Maximises the business benefits and provides value for money

» Links all recruitment activities to the achievement of organisational objectives

SUSHIL,

Not knowing exactly your

-company

-your corporate branding

-your corporate strategic objectives/ strategies

-your company's HR STRATEGIC DIRECTIONS

I HAVE PUT TOGETHER A COLLAGE OF IDEAS/CONCEPTS.

IN THE LIGHT OF YOUR

-company

-your corporate branding

-your corporate strategic objectives/ strategies

-your company's HR STRATEGIC DIRECTIONS

WITH WHICH YOU MUST BE PRETTY FAMILIAR,

YOU CAN EASILY PUT TOGETHER A

STRATEGIC STRATEGIC RECRUITMENT PLAN.

=====================================



RECRUITMENT/SELECTION STRATEGIC PLANNING

IS LINKED TO

HR STRATREGIC PLANNING AND HR STRATEGY

WHICH IS IN TURN LINKED TO

CORPORATE PLANNING/ OBJECTIVES/ CORPORATE STRATEGY.

THE FLOW IS

1.VISION STATEMENT

vvvv

2. MISSION STATEMENT

vvvv

3.STRATEGIC DIRECTIVE

vvvv

4.CORPORATE OBJECTIVES

vvvvv

5.CORPORATE STRATEGY.

vvvv

THESE SETS UP AND GUIDES THE

HR PLANNING.

EXAMPLE

1.VISION STATEMENT

-world's major player with our core products

2. MISSION STATEMENT

-customer focus drive and quality service

3.STRATEGIC DIRECTIVE

-go global, with expansion into europe, as first priority.

4.CORPORATE OBJECTIVES

-gain 3% of world market.

-gain 5% of europe market

-no. 1 in south asia.

5.CORPORATE STRATEGY.

-market focused promotions

-customer focused sales drive

-set up/ develop the sales team in europe

-expand / develop the skills of the sales team.

BASED ON THE ABOVE ,

THE HR STEATEGIC PLANNING COULD BE

-more recruitment for south asia sales team.

-new recruitment for euro market

-language training for euro team

-language training for marketing/ product management

-orientation /training in geography/culture of europe

-euro market/ competition

-sales skills / development programs

-customer service skills / development program

for internal staff to handle euro customers.

etc etc.

NOW YOU CAN SEE FLOW OF THE PROCESS

FROM CORPORATE STRATEGY TO HR PLANNING

TO RECRUITMENT /SELECTION STRATEGIC PLANNING.

RECRUITMENT/SELECTION STRATEGIC PLANNING IS

A PRODUCT OF HR STRATEGIC PLANNING.

HR PLANNING IS A SUPPORT FUNCTION

TO THE CORPORATE STRATEGY/ PLANNING.

CORPORATE STRATEGY DICTATES WHAT

HR PLANNING SHOULD BE.

HR PLANS MUST MATCH WITH THE REQUIREMENTS

OF CORPORATE STRATEGY.

=========================================

HR STRATEGIC PLANNING consists of 3 steps

1.DEMAND FORECASTING FUTURE PEOPLE NEEDS.

2. SUPPLY FORECASTING THE FUTURE AVAILABILITY OF PEOPLE.

3. ACTION PLANS TO MATCH SUPPLY TO DEMAND.

HR PLANNING process involves

1.CORPORATE STRATEGIC PLANS.

2. CORPORATE RESOURCING STRATEGY / PLANS.

-SCENARIO PLANNING

-DEMAND / SUPPLY FORECASTING

-LABOR TURNOVER ANALYSIS

3.WORK ENVIRONMENT ANALYSIS

4.OPERATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS ANALYSIS

5.HR PLANS

-RESOURCING

-RETENTION

-FLEXIBILITY

-PRODUCTIVITY

1. Forecast HR Demand – Forecasting the future employee needs can be done using several methods such as Delphi method, Unit Forecasting, Formal Expert Survey, Trend analysis etc.

2. Estimating the HR Supply – HR supply is the internal employees who can be promoted and transferred using a Management or Skill inventory and the unemployed who are seeking jobs or the employed but seeking better opportunities.

3. Then the HR demand should be compared against the HR Supply. This will result in an excess or shortage of employees for the future.

4. Strategies should be formulated to avoid the excess/ shortage. Excess can be deal with by freezing recruitment, transferring to other branches etc while hiring employees, getting existing employees to do over time; out sourcing etc can be done for shortage of employees.

5. Evaluating the MPP process- When the actual period arrives you can asses how accurate your MPP efforts were

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From internal and external stocktakes of labour availability and the Organisation needs to be assessed in terms of what work needs to be done and how it should be done to achieve corporate objectives efficiently and effectively. The analysis focuses on determining the supply of labour available from internal and external sources and the demand for labour based on assessment of internal organisational needs and external competition or constraints. This knowledge of labour supply and labour demand

enables the identification of the quantitative and the qualitative HR imbalance, or

people gap. Knowledge of the 'people gap' employment resourcmg decisions

and shapes the planning and resourcing activities needed for determining contractual

arrangements for employment, for recruitment and selection, for managing, motivating,

training and rewarding performance and for achieving employee release from the

orgamsation. HR techniques, employment policies and IT are the tools for the

implementation and control of the resourcing plans.

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The internal labour market

The internal labour market needs to be considered and this primarily provides information about the size, nature and behaviour of the workforce.

Labour turnover or wastage ‑ is a measure of the rate at which employees leave the organisation. It is needed not only as a measure of organisational wastage as a whole, but also, and more significantly, to identify areas of concern. A total wastage figure may be meaningless as it can conceal significant differences in departments or occupational groupings. To be of value in the planning process different measures of labour turnover are needed to enable the HR planner to identify areas in the organisation with high or low turnover. High labour turnover can be costly and result in a poorly skilled workforce because employees may leave once they are trained and consequently more valuable. Investment in training will not pay off if employees do not remain long enough to return the investment. Low labour turnover can also be dysfunctional since it may lead to a static or depressed internal labour market and inhibit the entry of 'new blood' into the organisation. Some departure from the organisation, such as retirement, can be planned, but it is the unplanned and unforeseen departure that is often problematic.

Different measures of labour turnover are available and it is important to be consistent in the measures used. It is also necessary to know what measures other organisations are using if benchmarking comparisons are to be made. Two common measures of wastage are the transition method and the central method. The transition method is a useful forecasting measure and compares the number of employees in post at the start of a period and the number of that group that leave during the period. It does not take account of other staff who start and leave during the period.

Transition Rate (%) =

leavers from the group in post at the start x 100 total employees in the group at the start

The central method includes employees who Join in the period and relates the total leavers to the average number of employees In a given period.

Central Rate (%) = total leavers from the group ‑ x 100

average number of employees in the group

These two measures give different results and when compared can indicate if employees are leaving within a short time of being recruited. Workforce stability can also be measured through calculating the percentage of employees with certain lengths of

patterns of work and flexibility

service ‑ one, two or five years for example. This is a reflection of accumulated knowledge, skill and experience.

Stability Rate (%) = Number of employees with service of one year X 100

Average number of employees in the group

In calculating labour turnover or stability it is important to use employee groupings that are meaningful: occupational group, department or any other logical grouping. Group size needs to be sufficient to give a meaningful result as small numbers distort the measure.

Cohort analysis ‑ describes the observation and recording of the behaviour and movement of a similar group of employees who join the organisation together. Wastage, transfer and promotion measures of this group provide information about the pathway through the organisation of those who stay and when and where the leavers go.

Staff profiles ‑ provide additional indicators such as:

• age distribution ‑ useful in planning retirements, identifying age clusters and generally

recognising and anticipating problems associated with imbalances in the age profile

• gender or ethnic distribution ‑ useful in monitoring the effectiveness of equal

opportunity initiatives and in identifying gender and ethnic segregation

• Skills profiling ‑ auditing of skills is more challenging, but fundamental if the internal

supply of labour is to be assessed accurately.

The manpower system ‑ is another element in effective HRP and in broad terms it involves the detailed identification of the different manpower systems operating in the organisation, the measurement of people stocks at the different levels and the manpower flows through the organisation. It is essential to know the main entry points into the organisation and the main outflow points. Some organisations, the armed forces for example, have all employees within a particular manpower system entering at the same point ‑ at the bottom of the organisation.

Analysis involves looking at promotion and transfer rates and the wastage from the system. This provides useful information on progression and bottlenecks that lead to employees leaving the organisation and also on the behaviour and movement within the groups. The Institute of Employment Studies has developed sophisticated models to enable the detailed measurement of the manpower system.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The external labour market

The external labour market has to be investigated to assess the availability of labour outside of the organisation. The external labour market includes all those working or actively seeking work. Labour markets are dynamic. People enter the market from fulltime education or as women returners, for example, and leave the market through retirement, illness or injury or a decision to no longer participate in the labour force. Referring to 'the' external labour market implies there is only one external labour market, whilst in reality there are many. The managerial skill is in knowing the specific labour markets which need to be accessed by the organisation. The number and quality of people externally is dependent on the nature, size, sector and geographical location of the organisation.

External labour markets are also defined by factors such as the nature of the work, the level of pay and the number of hours for the job.

The local labour market ‑ or travel to work area, is influenced by the attractiveness or otherwise of these pay, work and contractual factors, and other external issues such as transport and infrastructure. All of these define the distance an individual is prepared to travel to work and will shape the boundaries of the local labour market.

The national or regional labour market ‑ is delineated by geographical boundaries. The jobs included in a national or regional labour market are normally higher paid and more specialised. They usually require national qualifications or experience which command higher status and higher rewards. The more specialised the job requirements and the higher the job level the wider the boundaries of the labour market.

Occupational or professional labour markets ‑ are defined by the qualifications required to practise or participate in a particular occupation.

Gender labour market ‑ there are different views on the desirability of this as a concept, but in practice the individual experiences of both sexes tend to confirm the existence of a gendered labour market.

It is important for the organisation to know the labour market for the different jobs, to know how the markets behave and to recognise that these markets are different and have different features over time. Scanning the labour markets for information is done through job advertisement analysis, professional networking and benchmarking, exit interviews with employees who are leaving and accessing labour market information generated by government agencies and other specialist providers.

The nature and structure of labour markets

The participation rate ‑ is a measurement of 'who' is in a particular labour market. The recruiter needs to know which people are in the relevant labour market and how they can be attracted. The DEE, the Careers Service, OPCS and the Employment Service have information on participation rates for different groups for example by age, educational attainment, gender and socio‑economic grouping.

Flows from education ‑ measures the profile of those leaving education. It is important for the HR planner to have a clear picture of the skills and qualifications of labour market entrants from all stages of education. Quantitative and qualitative changes in those exiting at different points in the education system will be significant to the organisation and influence decisions relating to recruitment, rewards and investment in training.

Competition in the labour market ‑ also affects the nature and the structure of the market. A high level of competition will contribute to a seller's market, strengthening the hand of employees because employers will compete for quality recruits. This will influence policies such as reward, hours and work flexibility. Different patterns of work may need to be available as part of the resourcing strategy in a seller's market. A small number of organisational competitors in the tabour market will contribute to the buyer's market and reduce the power of applicants.

Several other issues influence the nature of labour markets

- The level of unemployment affects tabour mobility. High unemployment may make individuals more concerned for job security and more fearful of the reduction in statutory employment protection when starting a new job. This influences job change decisions and contributes to a more static tabour market. It cannot be assumed that all tabour markets will react to high levels of unemployment in the same way as there will still be areas of skill shortage. Whether there exists a shortage (tabour demand exceeds supply) or a surplus (Labour supply exceeds demand) the tabour market has a bearing on the balance of power in employment relationship between the sellers of tabour (employees) and the buyers of tabour (employers).

-Demographic changes influence tabour markets because age and gender profiles and ethnic composition change over time. Demographic indicators and information on social trends increase the information available to the HR planner.

An analysis of the internal and the external tabour markets therefore generates considerable information about the supply, availability and cost of tabour, the next stage of the human resource planning process is to consider the demand for tabour within the organisation.

======================================

Develop Comprehensive Recruitment Strategy Plan:

Once you have identified the strategic recruitment needs of your company, recruitment strategies must be developed and mapped out to ensure a focus and commitment to attract a skilled and diverse workforce. One of the first items you need to think about is where you are most likely to find quality candidates or your recruitment sources. Throughout , we refer to this as "sourcing". Sourcing is the ability of an organization to use an effective recruitment approach in filling vacant positions. When determining an effective strategy, there are a variety of questions that need to be asked such as

What types of skills does the position require?

Is the position to be filled needed on a temporary or permanent basis?

What types of applicants or groups of the population sector would most likely possess the skills and knowledge we are looking for?

What types of appointing authorities could be used for the targeted group?

What education level is required for the position?

What impact will retirements or projected retention rates have on the organization over the next few years?

After these questions are answered, a plan can be mapped out as to how to approach the recruitment needs of the organization. You may determine that comprehensive outreach must be performed. In order to carry out this effort, partnering with academic institutions, professional associations and other private/governmental organizations will be essential.

PREPARE AN OUTREACHING PLAN.

Sourcing Strategies: To help you determine appropriate recruitment sources to meet your recruitment needs, sourcing documents be developed that guide you with important questions to ask , relative to the type of position as well as by occupational series and recruitment source.

Scheduled Job Fairs: To assist in accomplishing your outreach efforts, you can review the comprehensive schedule of job fairs across the nation. The schedule includes job fairs that are sponsored by the Office of Personnel Management; job fairs at various colleges and educational institutions; as well as any locally sponsored job fairs.

Sponsor Your Own Job Fair: After reviewing the schedules of available job fairs, you may determine that a locally sponsored job fair is required. You may review a checklist of logistical requirements for setting up job fairs. Locally sponsored job fairs are often very rewarding because you have the flexibility to have many managers participate who can make offers on the spot. You know that applicants who attend your job fair are interested solely in what your organization can offer - there are no competing interests . In order to promote and market your locally sponsored job fair, or if you learn of a valuable job fair not listed on the schedule, you can enter the specific job fair information on-line .

Cost of Living Calculator: To assist you in providing information on the local cost of living, websites allow you to compare cities in categories such as taxes, housing, food and other costs.

Paid Advertising: Paid advertising can be used to supplement and support you recruitment strategies. Your local newspapers' office can often assist you in the design, layout, and in some cases the production of advertisements.

View Specific Recruitment Needs: To ensure that the entire HR community benefits from a corporate respective, it is incumbent upon recruiters to view the specific recruitment needs of your company prior to attending a job fair.

Prepare Staffing Plan: After you have assessed your strategic recruitment needs and developed a comprehensive outreach plan, a template is available to guide you through the steps in preparing a staffing plan for your customer. The staffing plan should consolidate into a comprehensive plan to illustrate the recruitment efforts to be exp

ended to support your customer's HR needs and allow them to perform their mission.

==========================================

STRATEGIC Recruitment Plan for 2005-2010[EXAMPLE ONLY ]

1. BACKGROUND: Outline below the conditions or events which are likely to negatively affect on-board strength (i.e., losses or reductions.)

a. List which positions are in heavy turnover occupations.

b. Describe any Commercial Activities planned or being conducted:

Number of positions being studied:_________

Occupations being studied:

Month/FY in which decision(s) will be implemented:________

c. Reductions in WORKForce:

Number of positions targeted for abolishment:________

Occupations to be affected:

Month/FY in which effective date(s) will occur:_______

d. Transfer(s) of Function (indicate whether ToF is out of or into the activity):

ToF In____    ToF Out____

Number of positions involved:_______

Occupations to be affected:

Month/FY in which ToF is to be effective:_______

e. Planned/anticipated

Anticipated number of losses:__________

Month/FY in which will HAPPEN :________



f. List which positions in this organization/activity are considered "hard to fill."

================================================== ======================

2. POTENTIAL ADDITIONS: Outlined potential additions to the organization or Activity. Specifically address:

a. Any new missions/functions in the next 3-5 years

b. Any Transfers of Function (ToF) into the activity.

c. Any major change in emphasis in mission which might impact staffing [ REC/SELE ] needs.

d. Outline which new and/or additional occupational groups and number of positions will be required to support these changes.

e. Note whether these positions include skills which will be new to the installation.

3. OTHER FACTORS WHICH MIGHT IMPACT STAFFING [REC/SEL ]WORKLOAD:

a. Are significant numbers of vacancies filled through placements? _________

If yes, briefly outline occupations and numbers of placements during the last FY.

b. Identify events not described above, such as seasonal employment, need for extraordinarily fast recruitment .

4. STAFFING PLAN OF ACTION

a. List the number of probable recruitment actions needed to meet mission needs in this FY. In addition to title, series and grade, include specialization(s) and/or specialized knowledges as appropriate. In addition, outline the typical or likely sources of recruitment for the positions identified.

b. Are there any events which are expected to produce a pool of candidates for anticipated vacancies? For instance, if outsourcing is expected to result in reductions-in-force, will these provide candidates for anticipated vacancies? c. Describe the chief barriers to successful recruitment of the occupations in which there are anticipated vacancies. Include the recruitment strategies which might be employed successfully, such as paid advertisement, recruitment bonuses, recruiting below the full-performance level, etc.

================================================== =====================

5. RECRUITMENT PRIORITY:

*Analyze the historical profile of enrollment patterns (i.e. by program, campus, and placements variables) in order to develop targeted recruitment strategies.

*Conduct research to find more effective ways to recruit campus students to specific company programs.

*Enhance contact and cooperation with all JOB FAIRS units IN THE COUNTRY.

*Focus on and enhance relationships with the EDUCATIONAL community.



*Develop strategies to attract a greater number of high academic achievers into the FUTURE PROGRAMS..

*Increase the overall yield from LOCAL TALENTS.

*Develop a better understanding of the transfer population, (e.g. special needs, OVERSEAS, etc.) in order to develop strategies to remove barriers and improve services for these TALENTS.

*Expand initiatives designed to develop the perception among THE LOCAL TALENTS as the first choice for professional advancement, development, and retraining.

*Work with IIMs AND IITs to develop strategies to recruit more from the degree programs.

*Expand community-oriented recruitment activities designed to promote the company AS A BRANDED EMPLOYER.

*Develop strategies to recruit an increasing number of TALENTS FROM ARMED SERVICE FORCES .

*Expand special recruitment activities which focus on increasing the diversity of YOUR COMPANY WORKFORCES.

*Develop a clear and friendly protocol for encouraging INTERNATIONAL TALENTS , where appropriate.

*Review COMPANY policies and procedures in order to remove unnecessary barriers and encourage international PARTICIPATION.



================================================== ===========================================

Strategy: Develop and strengthen contacts with potential applicants

♦Continue to participate at selected job fairs

♦Aggressively recruit and promote candidates

♦Create a colorful, polished brochure

♦Benchmark with Admissions to recruit diverse audiences in selected areas/cities

♦Partner/travel with IIMs/IITs ALUMNI to involve Alumni groups as recruiting partners

♦Attend the larger professional diversity job fairs

♦Develop an “COMPANY BRAND ” Program

================================================== ====

Strategy : Strengthen the current diversity initiatives.

♦Staff Information Development Program .

♦CREATE A Talent Bank

♦Professional Entry Position

================================================== ==================

Strategy: Improve recruiting efforts with Internet resources and Nationwide Advertising Services

♦Review data from recruitment and advertising survey

♦Identify new web resources that focus on specific diverse audiences

♦Utilize the experience of your Nationwide Advertising Service (NAS) partner

================================================== ==============

Strategy: Develop a funding proposal to pay for banners/buttons and memberships to other recruitment web sites

♦Web sites

–WEBSITE A

–WEBSITE B

♦Banners

–WEBSITE C

–WEBSITE D

================================================== =================

Strategy: Utilize and strengthen your collaborative networks with various States.

♦Strengthen, maintain and promote with each State contacts/resources for referrals

♦Develop linkages with several student organizations for internships potential

♦Create alliance with Career Services to appeal to new grads

♦Continue an informal mentoring network with students and employees

♦Collaborate with Office of HUMAN RESOURCE to provide support for new OBC hires

================================================== ==================

Strategy: Provide greater level of electronic on-line statistical information on the effectiveness of ads and make-up of candidate pools to the work units

♦Analyze candidate poolS



♦Analyze ad cost effectiveness

================================================== ==================

Strategy: Enhancement of total recruiting efforts

♦Assemble a team of staff to focus on recruiting

♦Identify variables that affect employment decisions and relocation .

–Conduct focus groups with POTENTIAL students from urban areas

♦Target specific urban areas for recruiting

♦Investigate and integrate some of the “Best Practices” used by top corporations

♦Promote THE COMPANY as a great place to work, in addition ................................

♦Provide Career Development Planning for new (and existing) employees

–Note: part of Competency/Broadbanding strategy through career paths

================================================== =============================

Strategy: Retention of diverse employees

♦Review current search procedures

–Adapt the current faculty search model for exceptional talent

– develop a process for tracking and reporting candidate pools

–Increase candidate exposure your company through campus visits

♦Diversity Advocacy

–Executive-level diversity advocacy company wide

•Finance and Business is a good model

–Strengthen roles and accountability of the conpany personnel.

- identify performance measures of effectiveness

♦Funding for Unit-Level Diversity Initiatives

–Develop system of accountability to demonstrate annual commitment of REC/SELEC resources

–Develop policy for budget percentage for diversity initiatives

♦Link Web Sites

–Increase awareness of effective resources for underrepresented groups

–Link web site databases in separate departments

♦Visibility of Support for Diversity

–Identify rewards that encourage employee accountability for diversity

–Promote greater awareness of the Equal Opportunity .

Strategy: Retention of diverse employees (continued)

♦Exit Interviews

–Modify exit interview process to garner more relevant position specific information

–aids in retention

================================================== =========

Evaluate Effectiveness Annually

♦Job Fairs -# of Referrals, Hires

♦Training -# of Hires

♦Talent Bank -# of Referrals, Hires

♦Web sites -# of Hits, Applications, Hires

♦Alumni Travel -# of Contacts, Referrals, Hires

♦Advertising -# of Referrals, Hires

================================================== ==============

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REGARDS

LEO LINGHAM

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