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Is there any policy on Leave that if the working days of any employees falls below 20 days in any particular month by virtue of no of weekly offs + Paid holidays for festivals, such employee will loose the benefit of all the Sundays of the whole month. For Example during the month of September thee were 4 Sundays and 3 festival holidays as a result the working days available was only 23 days. Suppose any employee applies his personal Leave (either EL or LOP) for 4 days then his working days during the month works out to 19 days. In that event such employee will loose all the Sundays benefit of 4 Sundays during the month. This practice is prevailing in some of the organisations who have formulated their own Leave Policy.
My Question is whether Such rule meets the legal sanctity or in compliance with the relevant law and rules applicable to such Establishment.
According to my understanding if any employee is on prolonged Leave that too Leave with pay or unauthorized absent continuously, then in such an event he will loose the holiday benefit since he /she has ot worked on either side of the holiday.
This has happened to one of my friend and she is seeking my opinion about the correctness or fairness of such policy adopted by the organisation
I request my professional colleagues to throw some light on this and share their experiences on such kind of situation

This is not right practice , although i doubt i really understand your query. But, under any case this should not happen unless sunday falls between two applied leave. as then sunday will be considered as leave and not holiday
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