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Hi,
It is not a healthy thing to make it a practice / policy to have such farewell parties.
But if the team wants to say proper goodbye with their own cost (Snacks, memento, etc), Then the 10-15 minutes of company time spent for this should be overlooked by HR....
(Unless this creates disturbance to other employees & cleanliness is maintained. Such events can be done in meeting rooms, pantries, etc where disturbance is tolerable).
Company is the place where we spend most of our awake time. It is obvious that we make friends & attachments here. Putting such strict rules for company time cannot be seen a very good gesture.
Best Regards,
Amod Bobade.


A formal farewell ceremony with no sort of partying can be entertained and can be made a practice in organizations. This will of course set an example of unity in the team
From India,
Somewhere I read years ago - " To meet, To eat, To chat And to depart - that is the saddest tale of mankind! ". Bidding farewell by the employees to a collegue on his voluntary exit from the organisation is a mark of respect and remembrance of their long time association. Managers have just to take it in a lighter vein in stead of with a parochial outlook.
From India, Salem
In my company we are not celebrating farewell, bocz it's employee is leaving the organization. But our employees gives the personal farewell to the person & mark a mail to everyone. and they are not mark to the senior management.Kindly suggest do we tell them to stop sending an internal mails to everyone or if they are sending an e-mail so they should be keep in loop to to management also.
Kindly suggest What I will mail to them that environment will be cool & healthy & intimate also.
Regards
Aagam

From India, Chennai
It is quite natural that it would also swing everyone’s mood. It would be better if we avoid such circumstances inside the premises.
From India, Chennai
Holding a small farewell party during tea break involving HOD and members of team/department for farewell party of an employee who is leaving is a good idea.(off course exiting employee should not have been terminated or dismissed etc)
This will foster good relationships among employees.
I really do not find any negative implication in this short but sweet gesture.
For years I have been doing this for exiting employees where ever have worked,without any problem or hindrance to official work.

From India, Pune
If we all take exits as negatives and handle the farewell gestures as waste of time then, i really wonder if the employees would stick around for the notice period and transfer the knowledge, as the moment the person puts his resgination, people will srat to distance from him, treating him as an alien in the group, this is a very harmful trend.
A request to all my HR members, we need to strangthen the company culture through people management and not through looking down on things in a different way.
Regards,
Ashutosh Thakre

From India, Mumbai
In my view point the procedure of giving farewell is a good idea as the person is going for the better opportunities without harming the organization.
From India, New Delhi
We'd say, don't make it big - but encourage the employee who's given the best and highlight his positives to the rest of the members - let the person who's taken the big decision to move on feel good about working for his current organization and let him contemplate on what he's going to carry forward on his next leap.
From India, undefined
Kindly suggest do you have any idea for paternal leave policy? how many days is applicable for if employees strength is 50 size of company. Kindly reply.
From India, Chennai

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