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Thread Started by #preetisingh01

Hi All.... Can anybody help me out to calculate the cost of living index for comparison between important cities in india (Delhi, Mumbai, Chennai & Bangalore) Regaerds Preeti
2nd August 2010 From India, New Delhi
Hi Preeti,

Hope this is useful to you.

Definition:

A Cost Of Living Index (COLI) is a price index that measures the relative cost of living over time. It is an index that measures differences in the price of goods and services.

A COLI measures changes over time in the amount that consumers need to spend to reach a certain level or standard of living. COLI is typically a number, where the Base Index is 100.

A Consumer Price Index (CPI) on the other hand is a measure of the average change over time in the prices paid by consumers. CPI is typically a percentage change compared to the previous period. An increase in CPI is called inflation, while a decrease is called deflation. Both the COLI and the CPI use a market basket of consumer goods and services.

A COLI is also used to measure the price of the same quantities and types of goods and services in different geographic locations. The COLI used in this way shows the difference in living costs between different locations.

An international COLI measures the differences in the local currency price of the same quantities and types of goods and services in different countries converted to a single currency. This shows the difference in relative living costs between international cities. The cost of living difference between locations indicates the amount that consumers need to spend to maintain a certain level or standard of living.

Amongst other uses, COLI's are used by organizations and individuals in the calculation of expatriate salary and cost of living allowances in order to ensure consistent salary purchasing power between the home and host country.

Next we will discuss how to calculate a COLI between 2 locations applicable to expatriate employees.

Methodology:

For consistency the goods and services are grouped into similar/related basket groups.

For accuracy the exact quantity and type of each of the goods and services within each basket are defined. Using these definitions, the prices of the same quantities and types of goods and services in each geographic location is obtained from at least 3 different suppliers representative of those that would typically be used by expatriates.

When calculating the cost of living between 2 locations the difference in the aggregate cost of all the selected basket groups are examined in each location using the average reported price in each location for the same quantity of each item. The basket groups are weighted according to Expatriate expenditure norms.

For example the following 13 basket groups have the following weighting which represents expatriate expenditure norms (the 13 basket groups do not count equally):

•Alcohol & Tobacco (Weight 2.0%)

•Clothing (Weight 2.5%)

•Communication (Weight 2.0%)

•Education (Weight 5.0%)

•Furniture & Appliances (Weight 5.0%)

•Groceries (Weight 16.5%)

•Healthcare (Weight 5.0%)

•Household (Weight 30.0%)

•Miscellaneous (Weight 3.0%)

•Personal Care (Weight 3.0%)

•Recreation and Culture (Weight 6.0%)

•Restaurants, Meals Out and Hotels (Weight 2.0%)

•Transport (Weight 18.0%)

Prices for the defined quantities and types of goods and services in each location per basket are gathered on a quarterly basis and the resulting index is updated for each of the above baskets. These indexes are then used to calculate the COLI between any 2 locations. The COLI is the relative differential in the local cost of the basket groups and the ruling exchange rate between the 2 selected locations.

When comparing the cost of living between different locations the objective is to calculate the difference in the cost of living expressed as an index using one of the locations as the Base. Typically the home location is referred to as the Base Location (Index = 100).

Practical Example:

Take for example a company headquartered in Location A with overseas operations in Location B and C. They send employees on 2 to 3 year assignments from time to time to Location B and C and need a set of COLI's using Location A as the Base City in order to calculate assignment salary and cost of living allowances.

In our example Location A has an index of 92, Location B has an index of 129, and Location C has an index of 75.

Using our example, you want to know what the COLI is for Location B and C using Location A as the Base Location:

•Location A COLI = (Location A / Location A) X 100 = (92 / 92) X 100 = 100

•Location B COLI = (Location B / Location A) X 100 = (129 / 92) X 100 = 140.2

•Location C COLI = (Location C / Location A) X 100 = (75 / 92) X 100 = 81.5

The COLI indicates the difference in the cost of living between the locations. In the above example the COLI of 140.2 means that Location B is 1.402 times more expensive than Location A. In this example the COLI is positive (higher). This would mean that a person who moves from Location A to Location B would need to earn 40.2% more, to have the same standard of living in Location B as they have currently in Location A.

Location C on the other hand has a COLI of 81.5. This means that Location C is 0.815 times less expensive than Location A. In this example the COLI is negative (lower). This would mean that a person who moves from Location A to Location C could earn 18.5% less and have the same standard of living in Location C as they have currently in Location A.

Applying a cost of living index to a salary calculation:

The COLI values are useful in calculating an appropriate salary in another location. A calculator such as a Salary Purchasing Power Parity Calculator (SPPP) calculates an appropriate salary using the COLI, exchange rate and hardship difference.

The salary used in the calculator is gross or net salary. We advise using net (after tax) salary. This will result in a net salary result in the new location, which would then be grossed up for tax and any other statutory deductions in the new location. The calculator will then apply the following formula based on the selections in the calculator:

Salary X Cost of living Index Differential X Exchange Rate X Hardship Differential = Calculated Salary in new location

Applying the formula to our earlier example with a salary of $100,000 in Location A, sent on assignment to Location B, with an increase in hardship of 10% and paid in US Dollars:

•Location B COLI = 140.2

•Location C COLI = 81.5

Salary Calculation = $100,000 X 1.402 X 1 X 1.1 = $154,220

This means that an employee earning a salary of $100,000 in Location A, requires a salary of $154,220 in Location B to compensate for a 40.2% higher cost of living and a 10% higher level of hardship.
2nd August 2010 From United States, Quincy
Thank you Kiranji for your detailed narration on COLI. But the statement that inflation is based on Consumer Price Index is not fully correct in India. Here it is directly linked with the Wholesale Price Index (WPI). (In most of other countries CPI & WPI are same and I feel that might have lead you to this concept). Regarding WPI, price variation of all commodities in the market will be taken into account. But for AICPI there are some differences/ limitations.

1. There is a particular Consumer viz. Industrial Worker.

2. Some specified goods & services are defined, called "basket of goods".

3. Along with the price variation of commodities, its consumable quantity will also be considered.

4. All over India 78 Centres are selected to take average.



Based on All India Consumer Price, Industrial DA being paid; variable in quarters commencing from January, April, July & October. I.e. for January the AICPI will be the average of previous September, October & November. Similarly for April it will be December, January & February, for July it will be March, April & May and for October it will be June, July & August respectively.

When the money devaluation is fully compensated it is called as full DA neutralisation. The formula for full DA neutralisation = (Total points - Base points)/ Base points (in percentage). The AICPI is introduced in India in 1960 and revised in 1982 & 2001. AICPI of 2001 x 4.63, we get AICPI of 1982 and AICPI of 1982 x 4.93, we get AICPI of 1960. For DA calculation AICPI of 1960 is accepted as the base.

Now in India mainly two term's wage settlements are in exist; Wage Settlements of 1.1.1997 & 1.1.2007. The base point in 1.1.1997 is 1708 & in 1.1.2007 is 2884.

I shall quote one example,i.e. calculation of AICPI for July '10. This is equalent to average of previous March, April & May; which recorded as 170, 170 & 172 (Base year 2001). Multiply with 4.63 and round, we get 787,787 & 796 (Base year 1982). Multiply with 4.93 and round, we get 3880,3880 & 3924 (Base year 1960). Find average of these 3 and round, we get 3895.

DA for 1.1.97 scale. Total points - 3895, Base points - 1708, Total - Base = 2187. % is 2187/1708 x 100 = 128.0 ( Correct to one decimal).

DA for 1.1.2007 scale. Total points - 3895, Base points - 2884, Total - Base = 1011. % is 1011/2884 x 100 = 35.1 ( Correct to one decimal).

I shall insert Excel sheet for IDA calculation w.e.f 1.10.2008. You may extent the rows further (as necessary) and just enter the 3 indexes towards the year 2001 in green colour columns. The results will appear in yellow and red is used for static informations.

With regards

ABBAS.P.S,

Secretary,

ITI Employees' Association,

ITI Limited, PALAKKAD - 678 623,

KERALA, INDIA.

+91 9447 467 667

AICPI (base 2001) can be had from the following site.

Labour Statistics Page 2
3rd August 2010 From India, Bangalore

Attached Files
Membership is required for download. Create An Account First
File Type: xls DA update.xls (22.0 KB, 1507 views)

hai Mr.Abbas Hope ur so fine .I tried to open ur excel sheet but it is not opened .plse forward to my email id
Thanks & regards
3rd August 2010 From United Arab Emirates, Dubai
Hi Kiran !!... Thanx....
Can u provide me this calculation in EXCEL Sheet , if u have ?? ... @

Pbasu
=============

Hope this is useful to you.

Definition:
A Cost Of Living Index (COLI) is a price index that measures the relative cost of living over time. It is an index that measures differences in the price of goods and services.

A COLI measures changes over time in the amount that consumers need to spend to reach a certain level or standard of living. COLI is typically a number, where the Base Index is 100.

A Consumer Price Index (CPI) on the other hand is a measure of the average change over time in the prices paid by consumers. CPI is typically a percentage change compared to the previous period. An increase in CPI is called inflation, while a decrease is called deflation. Both the COLI and the CPI use a market basket of consumer goods and services.

A COLI is also used to measure the price of the same quantities and types of goods and services in different geographic locations. The COLI used in this way shows the difference in living costs between different locations.

An international COLI measures the differences in the local currency price of the same quantities and types of goods and services in different countries converted to a single currency. This shows the difference in relative living costs between international cities. The cost of living difference between locations indicates the amount that consumers need to spend to maintain a certain level or standard of living.

Amongst other uses, COLI's are used by organizations and individuals in the calculation of expatriate salary and cost of living allowances in order to ensure consistent salary purchasing power between the home and host country.

Next we will discuss how to calculate a COLI between 2 locations applicable to expatriate employees.

Methodology:
For consistency the goods and services are grouped into similar/related basket groups.

For accuracy the exact quantity and type of each of the goods and services within each basket are defined. Using these definitions, the prices of the same quantities and types of goods and services in each geographic location is obtained from at least 3 different suppliers representative of those that would typically be used by expatriates.

When calculating the cost of living between 2 locations the difference in the aggregate cost of all the selected basket groups are examined in each location using the average reported price in each location for the same quantity of each item. The basket groups are weighted according to Expatriate expenditure norms.

For example the following 13 basket groups have the following weighting which represents expatriate expenditure norms (the 13 basket groups do not count equally):

•Alcohol & Tobacco (Weight 2.0%)
•Clothing (Weight 2.5%)
•Communication (Weight 2.0%)
•Education (Weight 5.0%)
•Furniture & Appliances (Weight 5.0%)
•Groceries (Weight 16.5%)
•Healthcare (Weight 5.0%)
•Household (Weight 30.0%)
•Miscellaneous (Weight 3.0%)
•Personal Care (Weight 3.0%)
•Recreation and Culture (Weight 6.0%)
•Restaurants, Meals Out and Hotels (Weight 2.0%)
•Transport (Weight 18.0%)

Prices for the defined quantities and types of goods and services in each location per basket are gathered on a quarterly basis and the resulting index is updated for each of the above baskets. These indexes are then used to calculate the COLI between any 2 locations. The COLI is the relative differential in the local cost of the basket groups and the ruling exchange rate between the 2 selected locations.

When comparing the cost of living between different locations the objective is to calculate the difference in the cost of living expressed as an index using one of the locations as the Base. Typically the home location is referred to as the Base Location (Index = 100).

Practical Example:
Take for example a company headquartered in Location A with overseas operations in Location B and C. They send employees on 2 to 3 year assignments from time to time to Location B and C and need a set of COLI's using Location A as the Base City in order to calculate assignment salary and cost of living allowances.

In our example Location A has an index of 92, Location B has an index of 129, and Location C has an index of 75.

Using our example, you want to know what the COLI is for Location B and C using Location A as the Base Location:

•Location A COLI = (Location A / Location A) X 100 = (92 / 92) X 100 = 100
•Location B COLI = (Location B / Location A) X 100 = (129 / 92) X 100 = 140.2
•Location C COLI = (Location C / Location A) X 100 = (75 / 92) X 100 = 81.5

The COLI indicates the difference in the cost of living between the locations. In the above example the COLI of 140.2 means that Location B is 1.402 times more expensive than Location A. In this example the COLI is positive (higher). This would mean that a person who moves from Location A to Location B would need to earn 40.2% more, to have the same standard of living in Location B as they have currently in Location A.

Location C on the other hand has a COLI of 81.5. This means that Location C is 0.815 times less expensive than Location A. In this example the COLI is negative (lower). This would mean that a person who moves from Location A to Location C could earn 18.5% less and have the same standard of living in Location C as they have currently in Location A.

Applying a cost of living index to a salary calculation:
The COLI values are useful in calculating an appropriate salary in another location. A calculator such as a Salary Purchasing Power Parity Calculator (SPPP) calculates an appropriate salary using the COLI, exchange rate and hardship difference.

The salary used in the calculator is gross or net salary. We advise using net (after tax) salary. This will result in a net salary result in the new location, which would then be grossed up for tax and any other statutory deductions in the new location. The calculator will then apply the following formula based on the selections in the calculator:

Salary X Cost of living Index Differential X Exchange Rate X Hardship Differential = Calculated Salary in new location

Applying the formula to our earlier example with a salary of $100,000 in Location A, sent on assignment to Location B, with an increase in hardship of 10% and paid in US Dollars:

•Location B COLI = 140.2
•Location C COLI = 81.5

Salary Calculation = $100,000 X 1.402 X 1 X 1.1 = $154,220

This means that an employee earning a salary of $100,000 in Location A, requires a salary of $154,220 in Location B to compensate for a 40.2% higher cost of living and a 10% higher level of hardship.[/QUOTE]
5th August 2010 From India, Delhi
Hi,
Interesting to note the methodology of calculating and applying COLI. Does anybody have access to survey details that compare COLI of different cities in India? Would like to get hold of the same to benchmark for a non-metro city like Calicut / Kozhikode.
Best regards,
Jaikish
2nd December 2012 From India, New Delhi
Dear Kiran, My saute to you. Only couldn’t understand ,Exchange rate and Hardship Differential Mangesh Wakodakr Aurangabad
20th March 2016 From India, Pune
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