Mahr
Head - Human Resources
Boond
Handling Operations.
Tajsateesh
Recruitment/talent Acquisition, Career Counselling

9 Things That Motivate Employees More Than Money:

1. Be generous with praise. Everyone wants it and it’s one of the easiest things to give. Plus, praise from the CEO goes a lot farther than you might think. Praise every improvement that you see your team members make. Once you’re comfortable delivering praise one-on-one to an employee, try praising them in front of others.

2. Get rid of the managers. Projects without project managers? That doesn’t seem right! Try it. Removing the project lead or supervisor and empowering your staff to work together as a team rather then everyone reporting to one individual can do wonders. Think about it. What’s worse than letting your supervisor down? Letting your team down! Allowing people to work together as a team, on an equal level with their co-workers, will often produce better projects faster. People will come in early, stay late, and devote more of their energy to solving problems.

3. Make your ideas theirs. People hate being told what to do. Instead of telling people what you want done; ask them in a way that will make them feel like they came up with the idea. “I’d like you to do it this way” turns into “Do you think it’s a good idea if we do it this way?”

4. Never criticize or correct. No one, and I mean no one, wants to hear that they did something wrong. If you’re looking for a de-motivator, this is it. Try an indirect approach to get people to improve, learn from their mistakes, and fix them. Ask, “Was that the best way to approach the problem? Why not? Have any ideas on what you could have done differently?” Then you’re having a conversation and talking through solutions, not pointing a finger.



5. Make everyone a leader. Highlight your top performers’ strengths and let them know that because of their excellence, you want them to be the example for others. You’ll set the bar high and they’ll be motivated to live up to their reputation as a leader.

6. Take an employee to lunch once a week. Surprise them. Don’t make an announcement that you’re establishing a new policy. Literally walk up to one of your employees, and invite them to lunch with you. It’s an easy way to remind them that you notice and appreciate their work.

7. Give recognition and small rewards. These two things come in many forms: Give a shout out to someone in a company meeting for what she has accomplished. Run contests or internal games and keep track of the results on a whiteboard that everyone can see. Tangible awards that don’t break the bank can work too. Try things like dinner, trophies, spa services, and plaques.

8. Throw company parties. Doing things as a group can go a long way. Have a company picnic. Organize birthday parties. Hold a happy hour. Don’t just wait until the holidays to do a company activity; organize events throughout the year to remind your staff that you’re all in it together.

9. Share the rewards—and the pain. When your company does well, celebrate. This is the best time to let everyone know that you’re thankful for their hard work. Go out of your way to show how far you will go when people help your company succeed. If there are disappointments, share those too. If you expect high performance, your team deserves to know where the company stands. Be honest and transparent.

Source: Inc.com
2nd December 2011 From India, Bangalore
Well laid-out Mahesh.
Should be useful to those who wonder how to improve productivity without a lot of expenses.
And only goes to prove that: Money is important, but not 'the' important thing in career [or even life, for that matter], even from the employee's perspective.
Rgds,
TS
3rd December 2011 From India, Hyderabad
Never criticize or correct. No one, and I mean no one, wants to hear that they did something wrong. If you’re looking for a de-motivator, this is it. Try an indirect approach to get people to improve, learn from their mistakes, and fix them. Ask, “Was that the best way to approach the problem? Why not? Have any ideas on what you could have done differently?” Then you’re having a conversation and talking through solutions, not pointing a finger.
I really wish my boss could read the meaning of the above said lines. As this is the single reason I want to leave the job , though its satisfying my finacial goal but letting my morale down everytime I am told to apologise to all for a minor mistake. As a result I am making more mistakes.
I wish I could tell him , how it feels like!!!!!!
3rd December 2011 From India, Bangalore
Hello Boond,
For a change, why not copy this & send to your boss--saying someone just sent this to you & thought it would benefit the whole company if HE sent it to others within the company rather than you?
Get the message/reason?
[You could have mailed the Link to this thread too--would have been more appropriate, but then, I guess you would land into more trouble than now, since he would see your comments too :-)].
All the Best.
Rgds,
TS
3rd December 2011 From India, Hyderabad
yea , but i dnt knw how to send this as a link!!!! again a mistake or in my boss’s view "AN ACT OF IGNORANCE". Thanks for considering my frustration. Warm Regards
3rd December 2011 From India, Bangalore
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