Prof.Lakshman
Professor
Leolingham2000
Management Consultant
Dplbhr
Human Resource Management
Madhumita_roy
Hr Manager

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Dear Seniors,
Can anybody help me with setting of objectives/targets or the KPI's of an Effective Induction Program? what should be the targets or objectives for measuring performance of the employees taking induction/orientation programs in organisations?
regards,
Madhumita Roy
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KPI for INDUCTION.

You cannot apply KPI to the INDUCTION PROGRAM.

What is induction for?

The purpose of induction is to ensure the effective integration of staff into or across the organisation for the benefit of both parties.

A good induction programme contains the following elements:

Orientation (physical) - describing where the facilities are

Orientation (organisational) - showing how the employee fits into the team

Health and safety information - this is a legal requirement

Explanation of terms and conditions

Details of the organisation's history, its products and services, its culture and values

A clear outline of the job/role requirements.

==================================================

The OUTCOME of an INDUCTION program is the gain in

-knowledge

-skills

-understanding

-process

-culture tuning

-awareness

etc.

There is no performance criteria / measurement / no KRAs under

which the employee perform.

YOU CAN ONLY MEASURE THE OUTCOME, THROUGH

-DE-BRIEFING

-VERBAL TESTING

-WRITTEN OR ONLINE TESTING

TO MAKE SURE THE NEW EMPLOYEE HAS GAINED

-knowledge

-skills

-understanding

-process

=================================================

HERE ARE SOME HIGHLIGHTS OF INDUCTION

The basics of an induction process

The structure of an induction course depends not only on the size and nature of an organisation but also on the type of recruit. The process begins at the recruitment stage and continues into employment. New recruits need to know the organisation, the culture and the people, and their role. Ideally, all new employees should receive an individual induction programme that reflects their specific needs. For a large company, this programme would be a combination of one-to-one discussions and more formal group presentations, which may be given within an induction course.

The line manager is responsible for a new recruit's induction, but would not be expected to cover all the elements personally. A typical allocation of induction tasks would be:

Line manager/supervisor: explain the departmental organisation, the requirements of the job, the purpose and operation of any probationary period and the appraisal system.

HR: cover the housekeeping aspects for a new starter (possibly on arrival, certainly on Day 1) such as completing employee forms, taking bank details, explaining the induction programme.

Safety officer: explain health and safety issues.

Section supervisor or a nominated colleague: provide an escorted tour of the department and introduce fellow workers; then give day-to-day guidance in local procedures for the first couple of weeks.

Senior manager(s) and/or HR: give an overview of the organisation, its history, products and services, quality system and culture.

Training officer (or line manager): describe available training services, then help to develop a personalised training plan. Provide details of other sources of information during induction such as the company intranet or interactive learning facilities.

Company representatives from trades unions, sports and social clubs, etc: give details of membership and its benefits.

Mentor or 'buddy': sometimes inductees are allocated a colleague, not their immediate line manager or anyone from the personnel function, to help speed up the settling-in period.

================================================== ===========

regards

LEO LINGHAM
Madhumita
Mr Leo has very well explianed...
Induction training program can be the one of the KRA of the HR Executive.....
The program effectivesness dependes upon the Knowledge / Skill gained by the employee...
Knowledge can be tested through:-
1. Test Paper
2. Report Writing
3.Quiz
4. Online Test
The marks obtained in the above is the effctiveness of the induction program....You cannot apply all these to every one....it again depends upon the recruitee.
You can plot the trend of the effectivness .....his can be one of the indicator.
Cheers
Deepali
I believe Leo has covered most of the details well. You may want to look at the following too.

What happens without an effective induction programme?

New employees get off to a bad start and never really understand the organisation itself or their role in it. This may lead to:

poor integration into the team

low morale, particularly for the new employee

loss of productivity

failure to work to their highest potential.

In extreme cases, the new employee leaves, either through resignation or dismissal; the results of our most recent recruitment and retention survey1 showed that 13% of leavers had less than six month's service. Early leaving results in:

additional cost for recruiting a replacement

wasted time for the inductor

lowering of morale for the remaining staff

detriment to the leaver's employment record

having to repeat the unproductive learning curve of the leaver

damage to the company's reputation.

The basics of an induction process

The structure of an induction course depends not only on the size and nature of an organisation but also on the type of recruit. The process begins at the recruitment stage and continues into employment. New recruits need to know the organisation, the culture and the people, and their role. Ideally, all new employees should receive an individual induction programme that reflects their specific needs. For a large company, this programme would be a combination of one-to-one discussions and more formal group presentations, which may be given within an induction course.

What to avoid

Providing too much, too soon; the inductee must not be overwhelmed by a mass of information on the first day.

Pitching presentations at an inappropriate level - either too high or too low.

HR rather than local personnel providing all the information.

Creating an induction programme which generates unreasonable expectations by being more interesting and more exciting than the job itself.

Demanding that inductees stop interesting and useful work to go to a dull presentation. This hinders integration and devalues the induction process and, possibly, the HR group.

Example of an induction checklist

Regardless of whether there is a formal induction programme co-ordinated by HR or a less formal programme run by managers, it is important to keep a checklist of the areas of induction training received, ideally countersigned by the individual. This helps to ensure all employees receive all the information they need. This checklist can be a vital source of reference later in employment - for example to check an employee has been briefed on policies, or to produce evidence of training in the event of a health and safety inspection.

Pre-employment joining instructions

conditions of employment

company literature



Health and safety emergency exits

evacuation procedures

first aid facilities

health and safety policy

accident reporting

protective clothing

specific hazards

policy on smoking



Organisation site map - canteen, first aid post, etc.

telephone system

computer system

organisation chart - global

organisation chart - departmental

company products and services

security pass

car park pass

security procedures

Official Secrets Act

Data Protection Act/ Freedom of Information Act



Terms and conditions absence/sickness procedure

working time, including hours, flexi-time, etc

arrangements for breaks

holidays/special leave

probation period

performance management system

discipline procedure

grievance procedure

Internet and email policy



Financial pay - payment date and method

tax and NI

benefits

pension/stakeholder pensions

expenses and expense claims



Training agree training plan

training opportunities and in-house courses

career management



Culture and values background

mission statement

quality systems

customer care policy

Trends in induction

Changing content


Fewer 'chalk and talk' sessions and more multi-media presentations, or active learning tasks (eg giving inductees a questionnaire where completion involves talking to people outside the normal scope).

Moving away from being purely about the practicalities of an organisation to discussing culture and values.

For example, an online induction and e-learning programme has been developed to introduce the culture for new HR staff in the NHS, and Tesco also uses e-learning for its annual 40,000 new recruits. In UK.

Involving a wide range of personnel in the programme development to ensure that the content continues to match the organisation profile; out-of-date or badly produced material is depressing.

More awareness of socialisation issues and using induction sessions for cross-function team building, for example, at the NHS University.

Evaluation

Holding post-induction reviews, either formally or informally.

Using statistics (eg on early leavers) to monitor the effectiveness of the induction process.

Dear Seniors,
Thanks a lot for all your valuable inputs. I think after reading your replies I have a thorough understanding of the KPI's of an effective induction program.
Thanks and regards,
Madhumita
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