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My Friend there is no difference between Exe - HR & HR Exe....It depends on company to company how they give the designation. But you will not get a designation called HR - GM.....it has to b GM-HR. In top Management designations are standardized.
In the big and old organisations, an employee is doing his job and with his experience he achieves certain status in the organisation. The concept of specialisation is very recent. Employees who join the organisation remain in the organisation for years and then started with the job rotation or if the organisation finds an employee capable of handling one function and needs him in another function to improove it. A designation is generally a combination of both a grade level and the function or the department. So today if one employee is handling Administration and his grade is manager, his grade is not going to change but his department /function is. so he can be termed as Manager - Administration or Manager - HR. HR manager sounds as if we are using the shortcuts.
So Manager - HR is more professional way of using it.

I dont think there is significant difference between these two. If such distinction exists it should be reflected in the Job description. Regards, Shijit.
The difference between both would be there in the profile and in terms of grade of the individual rest i see no difference. Regards,
Hello All,
I think only Anjali came closest to the truth.
If you look @ just the Dictionary meaning, all are right-there's NO difference between each of the two sets.
But look @ it from another perspective....who is deciding these? The management...right? So, in a way, it is a CLEAR GIVEAWAY of the mental outlook of the ones @ the top...reflects their way of thinking and/or their focus towards life in general.
When it is "HR Manager", the focus is MORE on the function from the mental outlook of the management......meaning more function-oriented/business-like in the way they see the organisation.
When it is "Manager-HR", the focus is more on the designation........meaning more oriented towards the high-flying designations [an import from USA, where designations like President, Vice-President, etc are in vogue]. I remember a joke w.r.t hiring some senior profiles [now don't think they don't give such things a lot of weightage-they do MUCH MORE than lower staff]-give the guy the designation of a VP but with the job content of a senior exec...there are guys who don't mind.
Not sure how many agree with me......:neutral:
Rgds,
TS

Hello All,
I think only Anjali came closest to the truth.

If you look @ just the Dictionary meaning, all are right-there's NO difference between each of the two sets.
But look @ it from another perspective....who is deciding these? The management...right? So, in a way, it is a CLEAR GIVEAWAY of the mental outlook of the ones @ the top...reflects their way of thinking and/or their focus towards life in general.
When it is "HR Manager", the focus is MORE on the function from the mental outlook of the management......meaning more function-oriented/business-like in the way they see & run the organisation. So, in a way, if you work for such a company, you can be sure that as long as you do your job well, minor fooling-around may be tolerated:p.

When it is "Manager-HR", the focus is more on the designation........meaning more oriented towards the high-flying designations [an import from USA, where designations like President, Vice-President, etc are the norm]. I remember a joke w.r.t hiring some senior profiles [now don't think they don't give such things a lot of weightage-they do MUCH MORE than lower staff]-give the guy the designation of a VP but with the job content of a senior exec...there are guys who don't mind.

So, practically, you can make your choice of the company when you change your next job...depends on how YOU look @ life and WHAT YOU WANT from the NEW job-& if the new company meets your perceptions.

Not sure how many agree with me......:neutral:

Rgds,
TS

No , Both the designations is same. You can write or spell it in any of the way but the meaning is same....
Dear Dilshad,
Not sure to what extent, but will try clarifying.......
Executive HR is a term generally used specifying the varied functionalities of HRM and may or may not refer to an individual post / designation whereas an HR Executive refers to an individual who has joined an organisation and is at the base level of the HR Department.
Technically there is not much of a difference between Manager HR & HR Manager but for the fact that the former is used to address an individual with emphasis on the Designation he / she holds and the latter is used with an emphasis on the Department.
Executive Admin - is one who has joined the Admin dept of an organisation at the base level.
HR Executive - is one who has joined the HR dept of an organisation at the base level.
HR - Admin might be someone who handles both HR and Admin at the base level either due to i) the nature of the organisation or ii) the size of the organisation.
Hope this satisfies the need for clarification.:p:p:p

ASHA and ABHI are perfect.
There is no difference......
But Asha Ji,i request you dont be harsh on any one,We all are here for knowledge sharing.
I respect your dedication and contribution for Cite-HR,but if a persone do not know we should help him out rather than saying harsh words.
Please do not take it otherwise.

Dear Akhilesh,
You need to understand that - by doing so, u r not letting the person think.
If tomorrow he asks the same question to the Management - he will only be considered "ignorant" (I used a better word here)
Its sometimes okay to be harsh, provided the intention is not to insult.
My message is "Think b4 u ask questions, never ask for the sake of asking"
If someone does not know we have to help. But if someone does not even have a logical thinking process, we must teach them to do so.


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