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Recruiting: 6 Tips for Employers to Develop a Sales Pitch

You’ll need to be able to answer the following questions to successfully develop your company’s “sales pitch” for new talent:

1. What is the vision for the company or organization in three, five and ten years? Think in terms of the following: Revenues, number of employees, new markets, services or products, profitability. Don’t be afraid to talk about the softer matters like cultural change and change management initiatives that the company plans for the future.

2. How does your organization differ from your competitors? What is your competitive advantage? Can you substantiate or quantify this?

3. Is this position newly created or is this revised? If it has been revised, how should the position appeal to the candidate?

4. What is the turnover in your company? Why do people stay? Why do they leave? Here’s some tips for employee retention.

5. If this is a privately held company either owned by an individual(s), family or private equity firm, executive and management level candidates will want to know the succession plan or exit strategy. Answers to these questions can convey a big opportunity or raise some questions.

6. Do you understand what the market pays for this position? Have you benchmarked the salary, annual incentive and, if appropriate, the long-term incentive and related benefits for this position? If your total compensation package falls below the median you will not be able to attract top talent for this position. If you do attract them, you will run the risk of not retaining them over time. More on 2014 compensation trends.

By answering these questions yourself, you will be able to further develop your recruiting strategy, and also be more prepared when you get these questions from a candidate.

From India, Mumbai
It also observed that there are many companies doing very good with the limited number (suppose 25) of manpower with quality of work/projects but sometimes candidates are not happy by listening "the limited number" and think not to continue.
Could you share your experience so that we can learn how to approach in a correct way to candidates.

From India, Mumbai

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