Leolingham2000
Management Consultant
Subasini
Hr Executive

hi, i need a working function of hr manager in a firm.
15th May 2006 From India, Bharat
Based on your requests, HRManager working function include

depending on the size of the organization

-does it himself

or

-employs staff to get it done

or

-outsources.

BUT HE IS RESPONSIBLE / ACCOUNTABLE FOR

==============================================

1. JOBS WHICH ARE MANAGED AT LONGTERM STRATEGY

-HR and change management.

-Knowledge management

2. JOBS WHICH ARE MANAGED AT HIGH FREQUENCY

DAILY / WEEKLY/MONTHLY

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

MANAGING JOB DEVELOPMENT

-Job analysis

-job Role/

-Job Description.

-Job specifications

-Job enrichment

-Job rotation

--------------------------------------------------------

RECRUITMENT/ SELECTION

-recruitment

-selection

-induction

-orientation

--------------------------------------------------------------

HR ADMINISTRATION

-personnel administration

-personnel documentation

-termination management

-resignation

-managing workrules/ guidelines

-HR reports preparation

-leave management

etc etc

------------------------------------------------------

3. JOBS WHICH ARE MANAGED AT MEDIUM FREQUENCY

ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR PROGRAMS

-employee engagement

-motivation

-organization culture CHANGE

-organization development PROGRAMS

==============================

ORGANIZATION

-org. designing

-org. structuring

-org. development

-job / role structuring

=====================================

4. JOBS WHICH ARE MANAGED AT ANNUAL BASIS FREQUENCY

-HR AUDITING

-HR BUDGETING

-Strategic HRM Planning

-HR Strategies and Policies.

HUMAN RESOURCING

-HR planning

-manpower planning

-succession planning/ PERIODIC REVIEW

-talent management'/ PERIODIC REVIEW

=============================

PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT

-performance appraisals / PERIODIC REVIEW

-performance managing the processes/ PERIODIC REVIEW

================================

5. JOBS WHICH ARE MANAGED AT VARIED FREQUENCY

BASED ON THE NEEDS.

HR DEVELOPMENT / PERIODIC REVIEWS

-org. learning

-training

-education

-development

-Training evaluation

-e learning

-management development

-career planning /development.

=============================

REWARD MANAGEMENT

-job evaluation

-managing reward process

-administration of rewards

-benefits

==============================

EMPLOYEE RELATIONS

-organization communications

-employee communications.

-staff amenities

=================================

HEALTH AND SAFETY.

-OHS

=================================

HUMAN RESOURCE INFORMATION SYSTEM.

regards

LEO LINGHAM
15th May 2006 From India, Mumbai
IN PRINCIPLE, -they will be the same -there will be some modifications in places like *performance appraisal *compensation etc regards LEO LINGHAM
16th May 2006 From India, Mumbai
hi leo, cud i get more information about wht are the inputs to be made in HR Interview (any type of concern)
16th May 2006 From India, Bharat
RECRUITMENT / SELECTION PROCESS

1. REGULAR SELECTION BY INHOUSE

2. OUTSOURCE

3. HEAD HUNTING

AS part of the recruiting/selection procedures, for certain

positions--which are difficult to fill in, you can adopt

the following

-for tech. positions, you can outsource.

-for very senior position, you can use head hunters.

STEPS IN RECRUITMENT

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

PREPARING JOB ANALYSES

PREPARING JOB DESC procedural element for all positions

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

PREPARING JOB SPECS procedural element for all positions

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

DECIDING TERMS AND procedural element for all positions

CONDITIONS OF EMPLO

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ADVERTISING procedural element for all positions

[COPY/MEDIA PLAN] except for senior positions [ head hunting]

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

INTERNAL APPLICANT procedural element for all positions

EXTERNAL APPLICANT except for tech [ outsourcing ]

ONLINE APPLICANT and senior positions [ head hunting]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

SIFTING APPLIC procedural element for all positions

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

STEPS IN SELECTION.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

PERSONAL INTERVIEW

-INDIVIDUAL PER TO PER procedural element for all positions

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

-PANEL INTERVIEW only for tech. positions

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

-SELECTION BOARD only for senior positions

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

TESTING [ BEHAVIORAL]

-PSYCHOLOGICAL procedural element for all positions except senior position

-PERSONALITY procedural element for all positions except senior position

-ABILITY procedural element for all positions except senior position

-APTITUDE procedural element for all positions except senior position

-PSYCHOMETRIC procedural element for all positions

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

TESTING [ TECHNICAL ] only for tech. positions

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ASSESSMENT CENTRE only for senior positions

-POTENTIAL

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

OBTAINING REFERENCE procedural element for all positions

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

CHECKING REFERENCE procedural element for all positions

MAKING DECISION procedural element for all positions

OFFERING EMPLOYMENT procedural element for all positions

PREPARING EMPLOY procedural element for all positions

LETTER

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

NOW YOU CAN EASILY PREPARE , THE RECRUITMENT/ SELECTION PROCEDURES

USING THE ABOVE CHART.

WHEREVER, YOU / COMPANY FEEL CERTAIN CHANGES, YOU CAN EASILY DO IT.

IT IS A VERY FLEXIBLE CHART.

THE ABOVE STEPS ARE MEANT TO MAKE SURE

YOU DO THE THOROUGH / COMPLETE JOB

TO GET THE RIGHT APPLICANTS FOR THE JOB.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

AT THE INTERVIEW, YOU ARE TRYING THE FOLLOWING

-TO GET THE BEST APPLICANT FOR THE POSITION.

-TO GAUGE HIS/HER COMPETENCES, WHETHER HE/SHE HAS IT

TO PERFORM ON THE JOB WITH CONFIDENCE.

-TO CHECK WHETHER HE/SHE HAS THE PERSON SPECIFICATION

TO FIT THE JOB.

BEHAVIORAL INTERVIEWING APPROACH COULD GO A LONG

WAY TO ACHIEVE IT.

Behavioral Interviewing

What is Behavior Based Interviewing?

Behavior based interviewing focuses on experiences, behaviors, knowledge, skills and abilities that are job related. It is based on the belief that past behavior and performance predicts future behavior and performance. You may use work experience, activities, hobbies, volunteer work, school projects, family life - anything really - as examples of your past behavior. Current employment situation indicates that there is a strong trend towards this type of interviewing.

================================================== ======================

What Do Employers Evaluate in A Behavioral Interview?

Employers are looking for 3 types of skills: Content Skills, Functional - also called Transferable Skills, and Adaptive - also called Self Management Skills.

Content Skills -- Knowledge that is work specific such as computer programming, accounting, welding, etc. expressed as nouns.

Functional or Transferable Skills -- Used with people, information or things such as organizing, managing, developing, communicating, etc. expressed as verbs.

Adaptive or Self-Management Skills -- personal characteristics such as dependable, team player, self directed, punctual, etc. expressed as adjectives.

================================================== =================================

How Are Behavioral Questions Different from Other Types of Interviewing Questions?

There are 3 types of questions typically found in interviews:

Theoretical questions -- Questions that place you in a hypothetical situation. These questions are more likely to test your skill at answering questions rather than in doing a good job.

Example: How would you organize your friends to help you move into a new apartment?

Leading questions -- Questions that hint at the answer the interviewer is seeking by the way they are phrased.

Example: Working on your own doesn¹t bother you does it?

Behavioral questions -- Questions that seek demonstrated examples of behavior from your past experience and concentrate on job related functions. They may include:

Open-ended questions -- these require more than a yes of no response. They often begin with "Tell me...", "Describe...", "When...".

Example: Describe a time you had to be flexible in planning a work load.

Close-ended questions -- Used mostly to verify or confirm information.

Example: You have a degree in psychology, is that correct?

Why questions -- Used to reveal rationale for decisions you have made or to determine your level of motivation.

Example: Why did you decide to major in this program at ''X'' rather than at a small private college or larger university?

================================================== =================================

The behavioral interview technique is used by employers to evaluate a candidate's experiences and behaviors in order to determine their potential for success. The interviewer identifies desired skills and behaviors, then structures open-ended questions and statements to elicit detailed responses. A rating system is developed and selected criteria are evaluated during the interview.

In behavior-based interviews, you ask for specific examples of when the employee demonstrated particular behaviors or skills.

Behavioral-based interview, an assessment technique that focuses on what candidates have done in the past, not on what they say they might do in the future. This allows hiring executives to assess applicants more thoroughly, fairly and accurately than other methods, say human resources specialists.

The premise is that past behavior predicts future behavior.It's a very common-sense, practical way of thinking, because people tend not to change.

Interviewers pose structured, open-ended questions to determine which skills candidates have used successfully in prior positions. The assumption is that candidates will behave in the future much as they did in the past. Knowing how they acted can help employers more confidently predict how well they might perform in a particular job.

Rather then merely telling the interviewer what the employee would do in a situation, as in a regular interview, in a behavioral interview the must describe, in detail, how he/she handled a situation in the past.

In a behavioral interview the will have to demonstrate your knowledge, skills, and abilities, collectively known as competencies, by giving specific examples from employee's past experiences. The interviewer wants to know, that the employee have done it. He or she, prior to the interview, determines what competencies are required for the position. Then the interviewer develops a series of questions that will allow him or her to find out if you, the job candidate, possess the necessary competencies to perform the job. The basic premise of the behavioral interview is that past performance is a good predictor of future performance.

HERE ARE FEW SAMPLE QUESTIONS.

*Why did you choose your major and career?

*At what point did you make this decision?

*Specifically, what attracts you to this industry as a career?

1. Describe a situation where you had to request help or assistance on a project or assignment. [describe situation-action-outcome]

2. Give an example of how you applied knowledge from previous coursework to a project in another class.

[describe situation-action-outcome]

3. Describe a situation where others you were working with on a project disagreed with your ideas. What did you do?

[describe situation-action-outcome]

4. Describe a situation in which you found that your results were not up to your professor's or supervisor's expectations. What happened? What action did you take?

[describe situation-action-outcome]

5. Tell of a time when you worked with a colleague who was not completing their share of the work. Who, if anyone, did you tell or talk to about it? Did the manager take any steps to correct your colleague? Did you agree or disagree with the manager's actions?

[describe situation-action-outcome]

6. Describe a situation in which you had to arrive at a compromise or guide others to a compromise.

[ describe situation-action-outcome]

7. What steps do you follow to study a problem before making a decision?

[ describe situation-action-outcome]

8. We can sometimes identify a small problem and fix it before it becomes a major problem. Give an example(s) of how you have done this.

[ describe situation-action-outcome]

9. Describe a situation in which you had to collect information by asking many questions of several people.

[ describe situation-action-outcome]

10. In a supervisory or group leader role, have you ever had to discipline or counsel an employee or group member? What was the nature of the discipline? What steps did you take? How did that make you feel? How did you prepare yourself?

[ describe situation-action-outcome]

11. Recall a time from your work experience when your manager or supervisor was unavailable and a problem arose. hat was the nature of the problem? How did you handle that situation? How did that make you feel?

[ describe situation-action-outcome]

12. Recall a time when you were assigned what you considered to be a complex project. Specifically, what steps did you take to prepare for and finish the project? Were you happy with the outcome? What one step would you have done differently if given the chance?

[ describe situation-action-outcome]

13. What was the most complex assignment you have had? What was your role?

[ describe situation-action-outcome]

14. How was your transition from high school to college? Did you face any particular problems?

15. Tell of some situations in which you have had to adjust quickly to changes over which you had no control. What was the impact of the change on you?

16. Compare and contrast the times when you did work which was above the standard with times your work was below the standard.

17. Descibe some times when you were not very satisfied or pleased with your performance. What did you do about it?

18. What are your standards of success in school? What have you done to meet these standards?

19. How have you differed from your professors in evaluating your performance? How did you handle the situation?

20. Give examples of your experiences at school or in a job that were satisfying. Give examples of your experiences that were dissatisfying.

21. What kind of supervisor do you work best for? Provide examples.

22. Describe some projects or ideas (not necessarily your own) that were implemented, or carried out successfully primarily because of your efforts.

23. Describe a situation that required a number of things to be done at the same time. How did you handle it? What was the result?

24. Have you found any ways to make school or a job easier or more rewarding?

25. What tricks or techniques have you learned to make school or a job easier, or to make yourself more effective? How did you learn that?

26. How do you determine priorities in scheduling your time? Give examples.

27. Describe a time in school when you had many projects or assignments due at the same time. What steps did you take to get them all done?

28. Tell of a time when your active listening skills really paid off for you-maybe a time when other people missed the key idea being expressed.

29. What has been your experience in giving presentations to small or large groups? What has been your most successful experience in speech making?

30. Tell of the most difficult customer service experience that you have ever had to handle-perhaps an angry or irate customer. Be specific and tell what you did and what was the outcome.

31. Give an example of when you had to work with someone who was difficult to get along with. Why was this person difficult? How did you handle that person?

32. Describe a situation where you found yourself dealing with someone who didn't like yHou. How did you handle it?

================================================== ==========================

FOCUS AND DEDICATION TO THE INDUSTRY:

Why did you choose your major and career?

At what point did you make this decision?

Specifically, what attracts you to this industry as a career?

------------------------------------

TECHNICAL AND PROFESSIONAL KNOWLEDGE:

Your level of understanding of technical and professional information and your ability to apply technical and professional skills

2. Give an example of how you applied knowledge from previous coursework to a project in another class.

-----------------------------------------------------------------

TEAMWORK:

Working effectively with others in the organization and outside the formal lines of authority (i.e., peers, other units, senior management, and the like) to accomplish organizational goals and to identify and resolve problems. Considering the impact of your decisions on others.

1. Describe a situation where others you were working with on a project disagreed with your ideas. What did you do?

2. Describe a situation in which you found that your results were not up to your professor's or supervisor's expectations. What happened? What action did you take?

3. Tell of a time when you worked with a colleague who was not completing their share of the work. Who, if anyone, did you tell or talk to about it? Did the manager take any steps to correct your colleague? Did you agree or disagree with the manager's actions?

4. Describe a situation in which you had to arrive at a compromise or guide others to a compromise.

---------------------------------------------

ANALYSIS:

Relating and comparing data from different sources, identifying issues, securing relevant information, and identifying relationships.

1. What steps do you follow to study a problem before making a decision?

2. We can sometimes identify a small problem and fix it before it becomes a major problem. Give an example(s) of how you have done this.

3. Describe a situation in which you had to collect information by asking many questions of several people.

4. In a supervisory or group leader role, have you ever had to discipline or counsel an employee or group member? What was the nature of the discipline? What steps did you take? How did that make you feel? How did you prepare yourself?

5. Recall a time from your work experience when your manager or supervisor was unavailable and a problem arose. hat was the nature of the problem? How did you handle that situation? How did that make you feel?

6. Recall a time when you were assigned what you considered to be a complex project. Specifically, what steps did you take to prepare for and finish the project? Were you happy with the outcome? What one step would you have done differently if given the chance?

7. What was the most complex assignment you have had? What was your role?

----------------------------------------------------------

ADAPTABILITY:

Maintaining effectiveness in varying environments, tasks and responsibilities, or with various types of people.

1. How was your transition from high school to college? Did you face any particular problems?

2. Tell of some situations in which you have had to adjust quickly to changes over which you had no control. What was the impact of the change on you?

---------------------------------------------------

WORK STANDARDS:

Setting high goals or standards of performance for self, subordinates, others and the organization. Experiencing dissatisfaction with average performance.

1. Compare and contrast the times when you did work which was above the standard with times your work was below the standard.

2. Descibe some times when you were not very satisfied or pleased with your performance. What did you do about it?

3. What are your standards of success in school? What have you done to meet these standards?

4. How have you differed from your professors in evaluating your performance? How did you handle the situation?

-----------------------------------------------------------------

JOB MOTIVATION:

The extent to which activities and responsibilities available in the job overlap with activities and responsibilities that result in personal satisfaction.

1. Give examples of your experiences at school or in a job that were satisfying. Give examples of your experiences that were dissatisfying.

2. What kind of supervisor do you work best for? Provide examples.

----------------------------------------------------------

INITIATIVE:

Making active attempts to influence events to achieve goals. Self-starting rather than passively accepting. Taking action to achieve goals beyond what is necessarily called for, originating action.

1. Describe some projects or ideas (not necessarily your own) that were implemented, or carried out successfully primarily because of your efforts.

2. Describe a situation that required a number of things to be done at the same time. How did you handle it? What was the result?

3. Have you found any ways to make school or a job easier or more rewarding?

------------------------------------------------------------------

ABILITY TO LEARN:

Assimilating and applying new job-related information promptly.

1. What tricks or techniques have you learned to make school or a job easier, or to make yourself more effective? How did you learn that?

--------------------------------------------------------------

PLANNING AND ORGANIZING:

Establishing a course of action for yourself (and/or others) to accomplish specific goals. Planning proper assignments for personnel and appropriately allocating resources.

1. How do you determine priorities in scheduling your time? Give examples.

2. Describe a time in school when you had many projects or assignments due at the same time. What steps did you take to get them all done?

-----------------------------------------------------

COMMUNICATION:

Clearly expressing ideas in writing-including grammar, organization, and structure.

1. Tell of a time when your active listening skills really paid off for you-maybe a time when other people missed the key idea being expressed.

2. What has been your experience in giving presentations to small or large groups? What has been your most successful experience in speech making?

--------------------------------------------------------------

CUSTOMER SERVICE ORIENTATION:

Making efforts to listen to and understand the customer (both internal and external), anticipating customer needs and giving high priority to customer satisfaction.

1. Tell of the most difficult customer service experience that you have ever had to handle-perhaps an angry or irate customer. Be specific and tell what you did and what was the outcome.

-------------------------------------------------------------

SENSITIVITY:

Acting out of consideration for the feelings and needs of others.

1. Give an example of when you had to work with someone who was difficult to get along with. Why was this person difficult? How did you handle that person?

2. Describe a situation where you found yourself dealing with someone who didn't like you. How did you handle it?

=================================================

===============================================

WHEN YOU CONDUCT AN INTERVIEW,

The information available at the point of interview

1.RESUME

2.COMPLETED APPLICATION FORMS

3.FACE TO FACE INTERVIEW DATA

4.JOB DESCRIPTION

5.JOB SPECIFICATION

6.PERSON SPECIFICATION

7.JOB COMPETENCES

8.COMPANY PROFILE - EMPLOYER

9.COMPANY SCORECARD - EMPLOYER

Job opportunities / growth opportunities/ careers etc etc

-----------------------------------------------------------------

The items 1 [ resume ] and 2 [completed application form

would provide the recruiter the profile of the candidate

with information like

-name

-education base

-special training received

-total experience

-special expertise

-competences

-skill levels

-knowledge levels

etc etc

-----------------------------------------------------

and the item 3 [ person to person interview ] would provide

information like

-personality

-communication skills

-interests

-career plans

-aspiration

-future plan

-extra curricular activities

etc etc

------------------------------------------------

A COMBINATION OF ITEMS 1, 2 AND 3 WOULD

REVEAL THE CANDIDATE'S PROFILE WITH RESPECT

TO THE POSITION.

---------------------------------------------------------------

The items

4.JOB DESCRIPTION

5.JOB SPECIFICATION

6.PERSON SPECIFICATION

7.JOB COMPETENCES

would reveal the JOB PROFILE OF THE JOB POSITION.

----------------------------------------------------------------- -------

As we match the PERSON PROFILE with the JOB PROFILE,

there would be a number of factors in the person's profile

which would match / fit with the factors with the job profile.

THE MORE THE MATCH , THE BETTER THE FIT.

----------------------------------------------------------------- ---------

In our conclusion and summarising, as a recruiter,

we should show the candidate , how he/she fits

the job profile--SHOW THIS ELEMENT BY ELEMENT

WHICH WOULD RAISE THE INTEREST OF THE CANDIDATE

AND LIFT HIS/HER THE MOTIVATION.

Then we take the best fit position and link it with

7.COMPANY PROFILE - EMPLOYER

8.COMPANY SCORECARD - EMPLOYER

Job opportunities / growth opportunities/ careers etc etc

to show the candidate the opportunities that lies

ahead , which are at his/her disposal

AS A RECRUITER, WE MUST CREATE AND PAINT

A WORD PICTURE OF THE OPPORTUNITIES AND

WHERE THE CANDIDATE COULD BE IN 3/5 YEARS

IF HE/SHE WANTED TO BE.

A RECRUITER MUST NOT JUST TELL, BUT

-SELL THE OPPORTUNITIES

-ADVOCATE THE EMPLOYER AS A CAREER SOLUTION

-SELL THE BENEFITS OF BEING PART OF THE COMPANY

-MOTIVATE HIM/HER

-SEEK A COMMITMENT.

THIS WOULD GIVE YOU , AS A RECRUITER/SELECTOR,

A GREAT SATISFACTION OF GETTING THE BEST FIT

CANDIDATE FOR THE COMPANY'S POSITION.

regards

LEO LINGHAM
21st May 2006 From India, Mumbai
INDUCTION/ ORIENTATION ARE TOOLS OF

CHANGE MANAGEMENT.

When employees move from one company to another company, it is a change

From one situation to another situation.

There are positive as well as negative factors.

BOTH NEEDS TO BE SORTED OUT.

INDUCTION / ORIENTATION HELPS TO ACHIEVE THIS.

THESE INCLUDE

-HR PROCEDURES

-HR PRACTICES

-CORPORTE CULTURE

-JOB ORIENTATION

ETC ETC.



INDUCTION

The INDUCTION should be simple to understand but must

be complete to create satisfaction in the minds of the new

employee.

This INDUCTION should cover three specified areas

-Corporate culture

-Policies and procedures

-Safety , benefits, rights and responsibilities.

ORGANIZATION

-history

-Mission

-Vision

-Organizaional Philosophy

-Organizational objectives

-Organizational structures

-Industry

-Products and services

-Customers

-Employee's department

-Facilities

COMPENSATION

-pay schedule

-payroll deductions

-worker's compensation [ if any]

BENEFITS

-medical [ if any]

-life insurance

-pension

-credit union [ if any]

-employee purchase [ if any]

-service rewards

ATTENDANCE

-work hours

-rules on lateness, sickness, absence

LEAVE AND HOLIDAYS

-holidays

-leave policy

HEALTH AND SAFETY

-safety guidelines

-first aid

-emergency procedure

SECURITY

-security procedures

-restricted areas

-confidentiality

COMMUNICATION

-Co. newsletter

-bulletins board

-employee handbook

-emails

TRANSPORTATION

-co. bus [ if any]

-parking

-travel policies

-travel expenses

PERSONAL

-rest breaks

-meal breaks

-smoking policy

-canteen locations

PERFORMANCE/ RESPONSIBILITIES

-expectation from the employees

-ethical standards

-conflict of interest

-probationary period

-dress code

-performance reviews

-suggestion box

-equal opportunity

-sexual harassment

etc

THIS IS INFORMATION FOR THE NEW EMPLOYEES

ABOUT THE NEW COMPANY THEY ARE JOINING.

====================================

THE NEXT THING IS, ORIENTATION OF THE NEW EMPLOYEE

TO THEIR WORKPLACE AND THEIR JOBS.

Orienting employees to their workplaces and their jobs is one of the most neglected functions in many organizations. An employee handbook and piles of paperwork are not sufficient anymore when it comes to welcoming a new employee to your organization. The most frequent complaints about new employee orientation are that it is overwhelming, boring, or that the new employee is left to sink or swim. The result is often a confused new employee who is not productive and is more likely to leave the organization within a year.

With an ongoing labor crunch, developing an effective employee orientation experience continues to be crucial. It is critical that new hire programs are carefully planned to educate the employee about the values, history and who is who in the organization. A well thought out orientation program, whether it lasts one day or six months, will help not only in retention of employees, but also in productivity. Organizations that have good orientation programs get new people up to speed faster, have better alignment between what the employees do and what the organization needs them to do, and have lower turnover rates.

Purposes of Orientation

Employers have to realize that orientation isn't just a nice gesture put on by the organization. It serves as an important element of the recruitment and retention process. Some key purposes are:

To Reduce Startup Costs: Proper orientation can help the employee get "up to speed" much more quickly, thereby reducing the costs associated with learning the job.

To Reduce Anxiety: Any employee, when put into a new, strange situation, will experience anxiety that can impede his or her ability to learn to do the job. Proper orientation helps to reduce anxiety that results from entering into an unknown situation, and helps provide guidelines for behavior and conduct, so the employee doesn't have to experience the stress of guessing.

To Reduce Employee Turnover: Employee turnover increases as employees feel they are not valued, or are put in positions where they can't possibly do their jobs. Orientation shows that the organization values the employee, and helps provide the tools necessary for succeeding in the job.

To Save Time for the Supervisor: Simply put, the better the initial orientation, the less likely supervisors and co-workers will have to spend time teaching the employee.

To Develop Realistic Job Expectations, Positive Attitudes and Job Satisfaction: It is important that employees learn as soon as possible what is expected of them, and what to expect from others, in addition to learning about the values and attitudes of the organization. While people can learn from experience, they will make many mistakes that are unnecessary and potentially damaging. The main reasons orientation programs fail: The program was not planned; the employee was unaware of the job requirements; the employee does not feel welcome.

All new employees should complete a new employment orientation program that is designed to assist them in adjusting to their jobs and work environment and to instill a positive work attitude and motivation at the onset.

A thoughtful new employee orientation program can reduce turnover and save an organization thousands of dollars. One reason people change jobs is because they never feel welcome or part of the organization they join. The most important principle to convey during an orientation is your commitment to continuous improvement and continual learning. That way, new employees become comfortable with asking questions to obtain the information they need to learn, problem solve and make decisions.

Employees were asked what they wanted and needed from orientation.

They were also asked what they liked and didn't like about orientation.

New employees were asked what they wanted to know about the organization. Additionally, the organization's senior managers were asked what they believed was important for employees to learn when joining the county payroll.

Using feedback collected from employees, HR training staff first realized that meeting employees' needs required more than a half day training session. Trusting employee feedback, the trainers crafted a one-day orientation that gave employees what they said they wanted and what senior management believed employees needed to know. Essentially, the orientation mix now includes the less exciting topics such as W-2s and various policies and procedures, but it also includes details that let the employee know something about the organization.

Tips for New Employee Orientation

Human Resource professionals and line managers first need to consider key orientation planning questions before implementing or revamping a current program. These are the key questions to ask.

What things do new employees need to know about this work environment that would make them more comfortable?

What impression and impact do you want to have on a new employee's first day?

What key policies and procedures must employees be aware of on the first day to avoid mistakes on the second day? Concentrate on vital issues.

What specific things can you do to ensure that new employees will begin to know their co-workers without feeling overwhelmed?

What special things (desk, work area, equipment, special instructions) can you provide to make new employees feel comfortable, welcome and secure?

What positive experience can you provide for the new employee that she could discuss with her family at the end of the first day of work? The experience should be something to make the new employee feel valued by the organization.

How can you help the new employee's supervisor be available to the new employee on the first day to provide personal attention and to convey a clear message that the new employee is an important addition to the work team?

Since first impressions are crucial, here are some tips for putting your best foot forward.

Begin the process before the new person starts work. Send an agenda to the new associate with the offer letter so the employee knows what to expect. Stay in touch after he or she has accepted the position to answer questions or help in other ways. Also, make sure the new person's work area is ready for the first day of work.

Make sure key co-workers knows the employee is starting and encourage them to come to say "hello" before orientation begins.

Assign a mentor or partner to show the new person around, make introductions, and start training. Let the mentor have sufficient notice so he or she can make preparations.

Start with the basics. People become productive sooner if they are firmly grounded in the basic knowledge they need to understand their job. Focus on the why, when, where, and how of the position before expecting them to handle assignments or big projects. Don't overwhelm them with too much information.

Provide samples about how to complete forms as well as the individual's job description with the orientation packet.

Have some fun. Do not spend time on every aspect of the handbook, only on the very important topics. Play some games because this can help the learning process. Games include: Photo Match - after the tour. Each employee is provided photos of other employees and a list of names. The object is to match the name with the face. Signature Hunt - While employees are touring the facility, provide them with a piece of paper with names of several associates they will be meeting. They are then asked to obtain the signatures of the people they meet. The employee who obtains the most signatures, gets a prize. Other games that pertain to what the employee learned during orientation are also effective assurances that orientation is successful.

Provide a list of frequently asked questions with a contact person/department, and phone number or extension.

Plan to take the new employee to lunch, or ask the mentor, supervisor or co-workers to join the new employee in the lunch room. The first day on the job is not the day to leave the new employee in the lurch about lunch plans.This is a good time for the manager/supervisor to take the employee to lunch, include other co-workers, and make sure the employee is at ease.

Give the new person some responsibility for his or her own orientation. Offer opportunities for self-directed learning, under appropriate supervision.

Keep the new person's family in mind. A new job means adjustment for the entire family, especially if they have relocated. Do what you can to ease the transition and help them feel comfortable in the community.

Ask for feedback. Find out from former new hires how they perceived the orientation process, and don't be afraid to make changes based on those recommendations. You can send an evaluation two to four weeks after the employee has started, and ask: Now that you have been with the company awhile, did the orientation meet your needs? After the employee has worked for you for awhile he finds out what he should have learned but did not at the orientation. At Mecklenburg County, after their redesign process, one of the trainers, Allyson Berbiglia, says, "We recognize that we have to continuously improve orientation to meet the changing needs of our customers. What works now may not serve our employees well next month or next year."

An effective orientation program - or the lack of one - will make a significant difference in how quickly a new employee becomes productive and has other long-term impacts for your organization. The end of the first day, the end of the first week, the end of each day in your employment, is just as important as the beginning. Help your employees feel that you want them to come back the next day, and the next, and the next ...

Several elements contribute to a World Class orientation program. The best new employee orientation:

has targeted goals and meets them,

makes the first day a celebration,

involves family as well as co-workers,

makes new hires productive on the first day,

is not boring, rushed or ineffective, and

uses feedback to continuously improve.

Make Them Say, “I Am Welcomed, Therefore I Belong!”

Most organizations are great at celebrating the departure of a beloved co-worker. Why are we often so awful at welcoming a new one? Think about arranging a party to welcome the new employee. Celebrations produce enthusiasm. Have you experienced starting a new job only to have your co-workers and supervisor ignore you during the first week? If so, you understand the effectiveness of even a little enthusiasm! Some simple celebration methods might include: a letter of welcome signed by the CEO, a company t-shirt signed by all department members, and a cake with candles on the employee’s first day. Involve families in the celebration. Schedule a welcome luncheon or dinner for spouses and families during the employee’s first month.

Old-fashioned welcome wagons were once used to deliver goodies to new members of a community. You can establish your own “welcome wagon.” Freebies that aid the new hire in his job will reinforce the belief that company employees are glad he is there and want him to succeed. As an example, a map showing nearby eateries is helpful and appreciated. (An invitation to lunch from co-workers each day during the employee’s first week is even more welcoming!) Go one step further than providing a map of the facility and the parking lot. Provide your new person with a photo of himself in the parking lot, in front of the company sign. Visuals have great impact.

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REGARDS

LEO LINGHAM
21st May 2006 From India, Mumbai
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