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Dear Gk,

The info on KRA & KPI & KPA

''KRA'' AND ''KPA'' AND ''KPI''

Key Result Areas

“Key Result Areas” or KRAs refer to general areas of outcomes or outputs for which the department's role is responsible. A typical role targets three to five KRA.

Value of KRAs.

Identifying KRAs helps individuals: • Clarify their roles • Align their roles to the organisation’s business or strategic plan • Focus on results rather than activities • Communicate their role’s purposes to others • Set goals and objectives • Prioritize their activities, and therefore improve their time/work management • Make value-added decisions

Description of KRAs

Key result areas (KRAs) capture about 80% of the department's work role. The remainder of the role is usually devoted to areas of shared responsibility (e.g., helping team members, participating in activities for the good of the organisation). KRAs [ KEY RESULT AREAS are managed by

-KPAs [ KEY PERFORMANCE AREAS]

AND -KPIs [KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS]

KEY PERFORMANCE AREAS

To manage each KRA/ KPAs, a set of KPI are set .

KRA and hence KPI is attributed to the department which can have effect on the business results and is self measured where applicable.

THE IMPORTANCE AND WEIGHTAGE OF THESE ELEMENTS KRAs/KPAs/ KPIs ARE GUIDED BY THE COMPANY'S

*VISION STATEMENT

*MISSION STATEMENT

*CORPORATE OBJECTIVES

*CORPORATE STRATEGY

*CORPORATE BUSINESS UNITS/ DEPARTMENTAL PLANS/STRATEGY. FOR THE BUDGET PERIOD, WHICH IS USUALLY 12 MONTHS. =Now I will use HR department as a case study for our purpose. THE CORE KRAs of HR DEPARTMENT ARE

-RECRUITMENT/ SELECTION

-WORKFORCE PLANNING/

-DIVERSITY MANAGEMENT

-PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT

-REWARD MANAGEMENT

-WORKPLACE MANAGEMENT

-INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS

-SAFETY AND HEALTH WORKPLACE

-BUILDING CAPABILITIES AND ORGANIZATION LEARNING

-EFFECTIVE HR MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS , SUPPORT AND MONITORING

============================================-=======

EVALUATION OF HR DEPARTMENT

The evaluation of HR DEPARTMENT can have four levels of

perspective.

1. Strategic Perspective — the results of strategic initiatives managed by the HR group. The strategic perspective focuses on the measurement of the effectiveness of major strategy-linked people goals. For instance, the business strategy called for major organizational change programs as the business faced major restructuring and multiple mergers and acquisitions. In this context, the organization’s change management capability will be a key factor in the success or failure of its execution. Therefore, measuring the ability of the business to manage change effectively is the core measure of the effectiveness of HR and will be a key strategic contribution to the future success of the business.

EXAMPLES

-change management capability of the organization

-organization compensation and benefit package with respect market rate.

-organization culture survey

-HR BUDGET / ACTUAL

-HR COSTS BENCHMARK EXTERNALLY

-HR annual resource plan.

-skills/ competency level

etc

2.Operational Perspective — the operational tasks at which HR must excel. This piece of the Balanced Scorecard provides answers to queries about the effectiveness and efficiency in running HR processes that are vital to the organization. Examples include measuring HR processes in terms of cost, quality and cycle time such as time to fill vacancies.

EXAMPLES

-time taken to fill vacancies

-cost per recruitment promotions

-absenteeism by job category

-accident costs

-accident safety ratings

-training cost per employee

-training hours per employee

-average employee tenure in the company

-lost time due to injuries

-no. of recruiting advertising programs

-no. of employees put through training.

-turnover rate

-attrition rate

etc

3.Financial Perspective — this perspective tries to answer questions relating to the financial measures that demonstrate how people and the HR function add value to the organization. This might include arriving at the value of the human assets and total people expenses for the company. HR

EXAMPLES

-compensation and benefits per employee

-sales per employee

-profit per employee

-cost of injuries

-HR expenses per employee

-turnove cost

-employee '' workers compensation costs''

etc

4.Customer Perspective — this focuses on the effectiveness of HR from the internal customer viewpoint. Are the customers of HR satisfied with their service; are service level agreements met; do the customers think they can get better service elsewhere? Conducting an HR customer survey might typically arrive at this.

EXAMPLES

-employee perception of the HRM

-employee perception of the company , as an employer

-customer/market perception of the company, as an employer.

etc

================================================== =====

HERE IS AN EXAMPLE OF KRAs, KPAs and KPIs FOR HR DEPT.,

CORPORATE OBJECTIVE / STRATEGY

-improve the company competitive positioning and productivity

by 10%.

HR DEPARTMENT'S OBJECTIVE

-Achieve high productivity level in all activities [ say by 10%]

KRA 1

-RECRUITMENT/ SELECTION

KPA 1 --RECRUITMENT

KPI ----reduce average time taken to fill vacancies by 15%

KPI ----reduce average cost per recruit by 10%

KRA 2

-WORKPLACE MANAGEMENT

KPA 1-labour turnover

KPI ---reduce the labor turnover by 20%

KPI ----benchmark total HR COSTS externally.

KRA 3

-SAFETY AND HEALTH WORKPLACE

KPA 1 ---workplace accidents

KPI ----reduce workplace accidents by 10%

KRA 4

-BUILDING CAPABILITIES AND ORGANIZATION LEARNING

KPA 1 ----TRAINING

KPI --- ALL WORKFORCE below middle management should

receive a minimum of 4 days of training.

=========================================

THIS IS , ROUGHLY, HOW HR DEPARTMENTS

KRAs / KPAs / KPIs ARE SET , MONITORED AND

EVALUATED.

==================================================

FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH HR DEPARTMENT,

-you should take the job description of the individual

-determine the KRAs for the year

-identify the KPAs for the year [ which could change yearly]

-determine the KPI for each KPA, which depends on the company annual

objectives.

HERE IS THE EXAMPLE for a recruitment officer

KRA 1

-RECRUITMENT/ SELECTION

KPA 1 --RECRUITMENT

KPI ----reduce average time taken to fill vacancies by 15%

KPI ----reduce average cost per recruit by 10%

================================================

FOR OTHER DEPARTMENTS, YOU SHOULD REVIEW

Typical key result areas at the corporate and some functional levels.

JUST LIKE HR DEPARTMENT'S KRAs AND KPIs,

A COMPANY CAN DEVELOP KRA AND KPI

FOR OTHER FUNCTIONAL DEPARTMENTS.

SOME EXAMPLES

1. CORPORATION AS A WHOLE

-corporate objective / actual results

-sales growth %

-gross profit % of sales

-market share growth %

-return on assets

-return on investment

-corporate image index improvement

etc etc

===================================

2.MANUFACTURING

- Unit volume level

- unit cost target

-production efficiency improvement

-productivity improvement

-quality improvement index

-capacity utilization

etc etc

==================================== MARKETING

-market share %

-new product launches success

-profit contribution by productlines

etc etc

=====================================

SALES

-sales against last year

-sales against target

-sales coverage improvement

etc etc

======================================

DISTRIBUTION

-market coverage

-customer coverage

-channel coverage

=======================================

CUSTOMER SERVICE

-CUSTOMER SERVICE IMPROVEMENT

-CUSTOMER SATISFACTION ACHIEVEMENT

ETC ETC

======================================

WAREHOUSING / TRANSPORTATION

-%ACHIEVED AGAINST ORDERS

-PICKING / PACKING RATE

-FINISHED GOODS INVENTORY LEVEL

-STOCK TURNOVER

====================================

FINANCE

-Cost of Capital USED

- Receivables leveL / against sales

-Bad debt level

-Debt equity ratio

=====================================

PROCUREMENT / SUPPLY

-raw material inventory levels

-cost saving target

etc etc

===============================

HERE IS ANOTHER EXAMPLE OF AN INDIVIDUAL

IN SALES

JOB TITLE: Sales Representative

JOB PURPOSE: SERVES CUSTOMERS

by selling products; meeting customer needs.

ESSENTIAL JOB RESPONSIBILITIES

1. SERVICES EXISTING ACCOUNTS, OBTAINS ORDERS, AND ESTABLISHES NEW ACCOUNTS by planning and organizing daily work schedule to call on existing or potential sales

outlets and other trade factors.

2. ADJUSTS CONTENT OF SALES PRESENTATIONS

by studying the type of sales outlet or trade factor.

3. FOCUSES SALES EFFORTS

by studying existing and potential volume of dealers.

4. SUBMITS ORDERS

by referring to price lists and product literature.

5. KEEPS MANAGEMENT INFORMED

by submitting activity and results reports, such as daily call reports, weekly work plans, and monthly and annual territory analyses.

6. MONITORS COMPETITION by gathering current marketplace information on pricing, products, new products, delivery schedules, merchandising techniques, etc.

7. RECOMMENDS CHANGES IN PRODUCTS, SERVICE, AND POLICY by evaluating results and competitive developments.

8. RESOLVES CUSTOMER COMPLAINTS

by investigating problems; developing solutions, preparing reports; making recommendations to management.

9. PREPARES SALES OUTLET PERSONNEL, CONTRACTORS, AND OTHER TRADE FACTORS WITH PRODUCT KNOWLEDGE AND SELLING SKILLS by conducting and/or participating in

sales promotion and educational meetings.

10. MAINTAINS PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL KNOWLEDGE

by attending educational workshops , reviewing professional publications; establishing personal networks; participating in professional societies.

11. PROVIDES HISTORICAL RECORDS by maintaining records on area and customer sales.

12. CONTRIBUTES TO TEAM EFFORT

by accomplishing related results as needed. BASED ON THE ABOVE JOB DESCRIPTION, THE

KRAs / KPAs / KPIs ARE

KRA 1 TERRITORY MANAGEMENT

KPA 1 --no. of accounts

KPI 1 ---100% of target in the top 10 accounts.

KRA 2 CUSTOMER SERVICING

KPA 1 CUSTOMER COMPLAINTS

KPI 1 REDUCE CUSTOMER COMPLAINTS TO '0' LEVEL

--------------------------------------------------

KRA 3 SALES RESULTS

KPA 1 SALES [ ACTUAL / TARGET]

KPA 2 PRODUCTLINE SALES [ SALES BY TARGET]

TEAM LEADER KPIs

1. *DELIVERY TARGETS

2. *COST TARGETS

3. *QUALITY TARGETS

4. *PRODUCTION OUTPUT TARGET

5. *NO. OF TRAINING SESSIONS PLAN/ ACTUAL

6. *NO. OF IMPROVEMENT PROGRAMS

7. *CUSTOMER COMPLAINTS [ ACTUAL ]

8. *ABSENTEEISM RATE.

9. *STAFF TURNOVER RATE

10. *ATTRITION RATE

11. *PERFORMANCE APPRAISALS [ACTUAL / PLANNED ]

*[b]SERVICE LEVELS PROJECT MANAGER KPIs[/b]1. *DELIVERY TARGETS

2. *COST TARGETS

3. *QUALITY TARGETS

4. *PROJECT DELIVERABLES TARGET

5. *TIMELINESS OF PROJECT

6. *NO. OF PROJECTS PLANNED/ACTUAL

7. *PROJECT OBJECTIVES ACHIEVEMENTS

8. *PROJECT MILESTONES ACHIEVEMENTS

9. *RESOURCES MANAGEMENT [ ACTUAL / PLANNED]

10. *BUDGET [ ACTUAL / PLAN]

11. *QUALITY ACHIEVEMENTS

12. *CONTROL SYSTEMS [ EFFECTIVENESS]

13. *BEST PRACTICES ACHIEVEMENTS

14. *TASK ALLOCATION EFFECTIVENESS

15. *RISK MANAGEMENT EFFECTIVENESS

16. *CONFLICT RESOLUTION EFFECTIVENESS

17. *PEOPLE MANAGEMENT EFFECTIVENESS

Cheers

Prajyakti


Dear GK

This is a specimen summary report of KRA of Mechanical draftsman, you can similarly design for any other position.

Summary Report for: - Mechanical Drafters

Prepare detailed working diagrams of machinery and mechanical devices, including dimensions, fastening methods, and other engineering information.

Sample of reported job titles: Drafter, Mechanical Drafter, CAD Operator (Computer-Aided Design Operator), Design Drafter, CAD Designer (Computer-Aided Design Designer), CAD Drafter (Computer-Aided Design Drafter), Computer Draftsman Mechanical, Computer-Aided Design and Computer-Aided Manufacturing Programmer (CAD/CAM Programmer), Design Technician

View report: Summary

Tasks

• Develop detailed design drawings and specifications for mechanical equipment, dies, tools, and controls, using computer-assisted drafting (CAD) equipment.

• Coordinate with and consult other workers to design, lay out, or detail components and systems and to resolve design or other problems.

• Review and analyze specifications, sketches, drawings, ideas, and related data to assess factors affecting component designs and the procedures and instructions to be followed.

• Compute mathematical formulas to develop and design detailed specifications for components or machinery using computer-assisted equipment.

• Position instructions and comments onto drawings.

• Modify and revise designs to correct operating deficiencies or to reduce production problems.

• Design scale or full-size blueprints of specialty items such as furniture and automobile body or chassis components.

• Check dimensions of materials to be used and assign numbers to the materials.

• Lay out and draw schematic, orthographic, or angle views to depict functional relationships of components, assemblies, systems, and machines.

• Confer with customer representatives to review schematics and answer questions pertaining to installation of systems.



Tools & Technology

Tools used in this occupation:

Curves — Flexible curves; French curves

Graphics or video accelerator cards — Computer aided design CAD multi-unit display graphics cards

Plotter printers — Cutting plotters; Plotting printers

Scales — Architects' scales; Electronic scales

Scanners — Backlit digitizers; Large-format digitizers; Three-dimensional laser digitizers/digital scanners; Wide-format document scanners

Technology used in this occupation:

Computer aided design CAD software — Autodesk AutoCAD; Bentley Navigator; PTC Pro/Mechanica; SolidWorks CAD

Data base user interface and query software — Document management software; Microsoft Access

Graphics or photo imaging software — Adobe LiveMotion; Graphic presentation software; Non uniform rational b-splines NURBS software; Rhinoceros software

Materials requirements planning logistics and supply chain software — Bill of materials software

Optical character reader OCR or scanning software — Scanning software; Three-dimensional scanning software

Knowledge

Design — Knowledge of design techniques, tools, and principles involved in production of precision technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.

Engineering and Technology — Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.

Mathematics — Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.

English Language — Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

Building and Construction — Knowledge of materials, methods, and the tools nvolved in the construction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures such as highways and roads.

Skills

Reading Comprehension — Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.

Mathematics — Using mathematics to solve problems.

Active Listening — Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.

Instructing — Teaching others how to do something.

Critical Thinking — Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.

Technology Design — Generating or adapting equipment and technology to serve user needs.

Complex Problem Solving — Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.

Equipment Selection — Determining the kind of tools and equipment needed to do a job.

Speaking — Talking to others to convey information effectively.

Judgment and Decision Making — Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.

Abilities

Near Vision — The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).

Oral Expression — The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.

Visualization — The ability to imagine how something will look after it is moved around or when its parts are moved or rearranged.

Oral Comprehension — The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.

Problem Sensitivity — The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.

Written Expression — The ability to communicate information and ideas in writing so others will understand.

Deductive Reasoning — The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to produce answers that make sense.

Inductive Reasoning — The ability to combine pieces of information to form general rules or conclusions (includes finding a relationship among seemingly unrelated events).

Information Ordering — The ability to arrange things or actions in a certain order or pattern according to a specific rule or set of rules (e.g., patterns of numbers, letters, words, pictures, mathematical operations).

Mathematical Reasoning — The ability to choose the right mathematical methods or formulas to solve a problem.

Work Activities

Drafting, Laying Out, and Specifying Technical Devices, Parts, and Equipment — Providing documentation, detailed instructions, drawings, or specifications to tell others about how devices, parts, equipment, or structures are to be fabricated, constructed, assembled, modified, maintained, or used.

Interacting With Computers — Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.

Getting Information — Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.

Making Decisions and Solving Problems — Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.

Documenting/Recording Information — Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.

Processing Information — Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.

Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates — Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

Evaluating Information to Determine Compliance with Standards — Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.

Analyzing Data or Information — Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.

Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships — Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.



Work Context

Face-to-Face Discussions — How often do you have to have face-to-face discussions with individuals or teams in this job?

Electronic Mail — How often do you use electronic mail in this job?

Indoors, Environmentally Controlled — How often does this job require working indoors in environmentally controlled conditions?

Importance of Being Exact or Accurate — How important is being very exact or highly accurate in performing this job?

Spend Time Sitting — How much does this job require sitting?

Telephone — How often do you have telephone conversations in this job?

Contact With Others — How much does this job require the worker to be in contact with others (face-to-face, by telephone, or otherwise) in order to perform it?

Importance of Repeating Same Tasks — How important is repeating the same physical activities (e.g., key entry) or mental activities (e.g., checking entries in a ledger) over and over, without stopping, to performing this job?

Time Pressure — How often does this job require the worker to meet strict deadlines?

Work With Work Group or Team — How important is it to work with others in a group or team in this job?

Job Zone

Title Job Zone Three: Medium Preparation Needed

Overall Experience Previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is required for these occupations. For example, an electrician must have completed three or four years of apprenticeship or several years of vocational training, and often must have passed a licensing exam, in order to perform the job.

Job Training Employees in these occupations usually need one or two years of training involving both on-the-job experience and informal training with experienced workers.

Job Zone Examples These occupations usually involve using communication and organizational skills to coordinate, supervise, manage, or train others to accomplish goals. Examples include funeral directors, electricians, forest and conservation technicians, legal secretaries, interviewers, and insurance sales agents.

SVP Range (6.0 to < 7.0)

Education Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree. Some may require a bachelor's degree.

There are 9 recognized apprentice able specialties associated with this occupation:

Drafter, Automotive Design; Drafter, Automotive Design Layout; Detailer; Die Designer; Drafter, Detail; Drafter, Mechanical; Drafter, Tool Design; Engineering Assistant, Mechanical Equipment; Mold Designer (Plastics Industry)

Interests

Realistic — Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.

Conventional — Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Investigative — Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.

Work Styles

Attention to Detail — Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.

Cooperation — Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.

Adaptability/Flexibility — Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.

Analytical Thinking — Job requires analyzing information and using logic to address work-related issues and problems.

Innovation — Job requires creativity and alternative thinking to develop new ideas for and answers to work-related problems.

Dependability — Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.

Initiative — Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.

Achievement/Effort — Job requires establishing and maintaining personally challenging achievement goals and exerting effort toward mastering tasks.

Independence — Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.

Integrity — Job requires being honest and ethical.

Work Values

Achievement — Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.

Working Conditions — Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.

Cheers

Prajyakti

Hi Leo, I have assigned a task to write KRAs for CEO of construction Comapnay. Can you please provide me some material or guidelines on this. Regards, Sanjay
Sanjay

Key Result Areas

“Key Result Areas” or KRAs refer to general areas of outcomes or outputs for which a role is responsible.

THE IMPORTANCE AND WEIGHTAGE OF THESE KRAs IS



-GUIDED BY THE

*VISION STATEMENT

*MISSION STATEMENT

*CORPORATE OBJECTIVES

*CORPORATE STRATEGY

AND COULD CHANGE YEAR BY YEAR AS PER THE BOARD DIRECTIVES.

THIS WOULD BE REFLECTED IN THE

-KPAs --KEY PERFORMANCE AREAS

-KPIs -- KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

=---------------------------------------------------------

HENCE , YOU WOULD NEED TO REVIEW

*VISION STATEMENT

*MISSION STATEMENT

*CORPORATE OBJECTIVES

*CORPORATE STRATEGY

OF THE COMPANY.

ALSO YOU WILL NEED

-A COPY OF THE CEO JOB DESCRIPTIONS

-COMPETENCIES THAT IS REQUIRED FOR THAT ROLE.

================================================== =

I HAVE TAKEN A SAMPLE/ TUNED IT TOWARDS A CONSTRUCTION

COMPANY.

YOU CAN MODIFY AT AS PER YOUR NEEDS.

================================================

SAMPLE CASE.

C E O

Position reports to.,

Board of Directors

Primary objective

Manage and direct the organisation to achieve optimum profitability and effective use of business assets and human resources. Develop and review policy, and plan, organise and control major functions relating to the operation and administration of the organisation through subordinate executives.

Specific accountabilities

Direct the policy and operations of the organisation for the achievement of short and long term business/policy objectives, increased profit, or market share.

Establish organisation objectives, policies and programmes and, if appropriate, set standards and targets. Analyse economic, social, technical, legal and other data or trends.

Prepare or oversee the preparation of consolidated budgets, required reports and forecasts and present them or recommend their adoption to the Board/parent company or governing bodies.

Appraise the activities of the organisation according to strategies and objectives, and monitor and evaluate performance. Consult with subordinate staff and review reconnnendations and reports.

Co‑ordinate subordinate staff to optimise the use of human and material resources to achieve goals, and resolve conflicts between areas of responsibility.

Oversee the development and implementation of all organisational activities to protect the funds invested and the interests of share holders. Ensure the security and development of assets and resources.

Represent the organisation in negotiations, at conventions, seminars and official occasions, and liaise with other organisations (eg. major suppliers, customers, industry associations and government representatives).

Authorise funds to implement policies, programmes and business strategies.

Provide overall direction and management of enterprises, including personnel, technological resources and assets.

Select, or approve the selection and training of senior executives. Establish lines of control and delegate responsibilities to subordinate staff.

May undertake responsibility for some or all of accounting, sales, marketing, human resources or other specialist operations in smaller establishments.

Ensure all the organisation's activities comply with relevant Acts, legal demands and ethical standards.

================================================== ================================================== ===

CEO COMPETENCIES

Leadership Skills

Communicates a compelling Vision and sense of core purpose, enlisting staff and others, and inspiring their allegiance to its fulfillment.

Espouses an appropriate set of core values and beliefs during both good and adverse times, and acts consistently in line with those values. Practices what he preaches.

Creates a climate conducive to an attitude of integrity, trust and professionalism, irrespective of job role, such that everybody wants to do his/her best.

Motivates staff to perceive their jobs as an avocation, much as they feel about pastimes, and to find ways for them to experience the same kinds of satisfaction.

Communicates with, motivates and coordinates the efforts of a large and influential force of member-volunteers supplemental staff, ensuring that they participate in development and effective implementation of programs that are needed and wanted by members.

Helps others to rise above self-limiting mindsets and constraints to make full use of their capabilities.

Encourages an attitude of lifelong learning to develop new skills that enable continued personal and career growth.

Builds team spirit, effectively blends people into teams when needed, and develops an appreciation for the value of the diversity that is generated by team cooperation.

Management Skills:

Sets standards of performance; gives feedback on performance, or lack thereof, to those standards; coaches for improved performance and development.

Oversees projects and delegated assignments to ensure they are completed on schedule and within budget, and that results meet defined expectations.

Relishes the command role, including unpopular stands as necessary, encourages debate, deals directly with adversity, and handles timely decision-making in an equitable and caring manner.

Prepares, implements, monitors and adjusts budgets to remain within approved expenditure limits.

Establishes and uses records, reports and other techniques to identify and track performance accountabilities.

Defines tasks, selects assignees, negotiates performance parameters and priorities, delegates authorities & accountabilities, supports rigorous problem-solving disciplines, and manages progress.

Attends to workplace and employment concerns and regulatory considerations, to ensure employees have a wholesome environment conducive to high performance and employment longevity.

Listens actively, speaks and writes clearly and succinctly suitable for a variety of applications and settings, and communicates to get the message across and achieve desired results.

Interpersonal Skills:

Relates to all kinds of people, uses diplomacy and tact, is able to diffuse tense situations, and builds rapport and constructive relationships.

Exercises patience and tolerance, and characteristically listens and tests to understand both the data and the people ramifications before acting.

Displays compassion about people’s work and non-work difficulties and is available to help; and is composed under pressure, dealing well with frustrations and not becoming defensive or aggressive.

Skilled at finding common ground to solve problems, and accurately reads conflict situations quickly and hammers out cooperative agreements with minimal disruption.

Knows personal strengths and limits and handles them appropriately, and assesses the need to modify personal behaviors to deal with changing demands and personalities.

Displays approachability and a positive and constructive sense of humor, and is able to ease tensions.

Organization & Planning Skills:

Marshals resources and uses them effectively and efficiently to orchestrate multiple activities and get things done.

Copes effectively and shifts gears comfortably dealing with change, maintains composure amidst uncertainty and can simultaneously manage multiple activities.

Scopes out accurately the difficulty of projects, sets objectives and goals, breaks down work into process steps, develops schedules and assignments, establishes measures and evaluates results.

Looks toward the broad perspectives of issues and challenges, can presuppose future scenarios, and thinks globally.

Sees ahead clearly, can articulate credible pictures of possibilities and likelihoods, and can create breakthrough strategies and plans.

Facilitates effectively the business processes and tasks activities of large, diverse workgroups comprised of staff and volunteers.

Results Orientation:

Focuses on customer service and is dedicated to meeting requirements and expectations of internal and external “customers”.

Acts with customers in mind, gaining their trust and respect, and establishing and maintaining effective relationships.

Exudes energy, is action oriented, enjoys working diligently, and can act with a minimum of planning in the face of uncertain circumstances.

Consistently can be relied on to achieve or exceed goals and is very bottom-line oriented, steadfastly urging himself and others for results.

==================================================

KEY RESULT AREAS [ KRAs]

This key role will have a number of key result areas, and will include:

Manage the performance and information team budget

-ACTUAL REVENUE / BUDGET

-ACTUAL GROSS RETURNS/ BUDGET

-NET PROFIT BEFORE TAX / BUDGET

-RETURN ON INVESTMENT [ ROI ]

-RETURN ON ASSETS [ ROA]

-MARKET SHARE GAIN / LOSS

Manage information team and ensure structure/workload reflects corporate & customer needs

-NO. PROJECTS PLANNED TO BE COMPLETED/ ACTUAL COMPLETED PROJECTS.

-PROJECTS IN HAND/ AGAINST PLAN.

Validate information analysis provided to customers and government directorates

-ACTUAL CUSTOMER COMPLAINTS / ESTIMATED

-ACTUAL ON SITE ACCIDENTS / ESTIMATED.

Develop and maintain effective performance reporting and monitoring framework that enables reports (covering all manner of performance-related data) to be produced for Board, Executive Team and other committees as required

-ACTUAL PRODUCTIVITY / TARGETED.

-NO. WORKERS TRAINED / PLAN

-NO. OF STAFF TRAINED / PLAN

-NO. OF MANAGERS TRAINED / PLAN

Establish and lead monthly performance monitoring group.

-ONCE A MONTH.

Generate awareness of the company

-6 ARTICLES ABOUT THE COMPANY IN LEADING MAGAZINES/ NEWSPAPERS.

-4 SPEAKING ENGAGEMENTS

Develop relations

-80% OF TARGET IN THE GOVERNMENT

-80% OF KEY TARGETS IN THE BUSINESS.

Liaise with the project performance lead to inform, clarify and/or update on performance against plan

Act as lead in any performance initiatives

REGARDS

LEO LINGHAM

Hi Leo, Thanks for sharing. Please let me know, whether we can use these objectives for HR metrics, being it is coorelated with major HR Objectives. Please advice. with regards :lol: Gautham C.
Hi there! Thanks a lot for making it a lot easier to comprehend! Btw, may i ask what are the salient components of an effective HRIS? Am afraid Id be tasked to develop one. Melyn Philippines
Dear Leo

How are you? i had gone thro ur posts ..ur guidelines r excellent ...i need ur inputs and suggestions in performing my job. Iam a Fresher i was assigned to
lookafter PMS Implementation & Identifing and drafting KRA'S of Ast.Manager and above cadre ......so presentely am doing ground works on Org-structure and Job analysis base to PMS and KRA'S...so i need ur valueable suugestions in strategic apporach, that how to start , manage and come out with good results .....step by step approch kind off .....i belongs to pharma industry...

Waiting for ur reply.....

regards
maru

MARU,

HERE IS SOME USEFUL MATERIALS.

REGARDS

LEO LINGHAM

FIRST STEP,

1.Discuss the objectives/ expectations with the CEO/senior management.

2.Review the corporate plans.

3.Review the corporate objectives.

4.Review the corporate strategies.

5.Review the corporate HR objectives/ strategies.

6.Review the business process.

7.Review the management process.

8.Review the organization structure.

=====================================

SECOND,

If there is any change to be carried out to the management

process/businss process/ organization structure,

COMPLETE THAT.

==========================================

THIRD,

As mentioned by you,

-take each position of ASSISTANT MANAGERs / ABOVE,

conduct the job analysis

Several methods exist that may be used individually or in combination. These include:

review of job classification systems

incumbent interview

supervisor/direct boss interviews

expert panels [ direct boss/HRM/ others]

structured questionnaires

task inventories

check lists

open-ended questionnaires

job observations

incumbent work logs

------------------------------------------------------

FOURTH STEP ---ANALYSIS OF THE JOB.

What Aspects of a Job Are Analyzed?

Job Analysis should collect information on the following areas:

Duties and Tasks The basic unit of a job is the performance of specific tasks and duties. Information to be collected about these items may include: frequency, duration, effort, skill, complexity, equipment, standards, etc.

Environment This may have a significant impact on the physical requirements to be able to perform a job. The work environment may include unpleasant conditions such as offensive odors and temperature extremes. There may also be definite risks to the incumbent such as noxious fumes, radioactive substances, hostile and aggressive people, and dangerous explosives.

Tools and Equipment Some duties and tasks are performed using specific equipment and tools. Equipment may include protective clothing. These items need to be specified in a Job Analysis.

Relationships Supervision given and received. Relationships with internal or external people.

Requirements The knowledges, skills, and abilities (KSA's) required to perform the job. While an incumbent may have higher KSA's than those required for the job, a Job Analysis typically only states the minimum requirements to perform the job.

What does or should the person do?

What knowledge, skill, and abilities does it take to perform this job?

What is the result of the person performing the job?

How does this job fit in with other jobs in the organization?

What is the job’s contribution toward the organization’s goals?

The process may seek to obtain information about the:

work

worker

context within which the job exists

=================================================

FIFTH STEP - DEVELOPING JOB DESCRIPTORS

Worker Functions. The relationship of the worker to data, people, and things.

Work Fields. The techniques used to complete the tasks of the job. Over 100 such fields have been identified. This descriptor also includes the machines, tools, equipment, and work aids that are used in the job.

Materials, Products, Subject Matter, and/or Services. The outcomes of the job or the purpose of performing the job.

Worker Traits. The aptitudes, educational and vocational training, and personal traits required of the worker.

Physical Demands. Job requirements such as strength, observation, and talking. This descriptor also includes the physical environment of the work.

skills

abilities

knowledge

tasks

work activities

work context

experience levels required

job interests

work values/needs

=========================================

SIXTH STEP -- DEVELOPING JOB DESCRIPTIONS/JOB SPECIFICATIONS

There are as many different formats for job descriptions as there are jobs, but there are some basic pieces of information that most job descriptions have. Include them in yours, if you feel they are appropriate.

Job Scope . This section should contain a brief summary of the information found in more detail elsewhere in the description. A summary shouldn't be more than a few sentences long and should explain the main purposes and functions of the job.

Detailed duties and responsibilities. This is a more detailed description of the duties involved and separates the essential functions of the job from the incidental job functions for purposes of the PMS.

Accountabilities. A list of outcomes, the position is responsible for.

Skills required to perform the job. This can include compensable factors such as education, experience, and abilities.

Importance of job duties and tasks. Ranking the duties from most important to least important is a good way to convey this information since the task that consumes the most time is not necessarily the most important task. You can rank on a scale of one to 10, for example.

When and how often the tasks are performed. You might want to mention that certain tasks are only done once a month, quarter, year etc.

Job environment. Job environments can impact significantly on workers' motivation and job satisfaction. For example, it's a good idea to include in job descriptions factors like the fact that the work is done off-premises, or mention the existence of hazards, noises, physical proximity of other employees, and opportunities to communicate with other employees. Including these factors in the job description helps job applicants better understand the requirements of the job and helps you select the best candidate for the position.

Working Relationship. should include 1] direct reporting 2] dotted line communication 3]others.

Competencies.

KRA [ Key responsible areas]

KPA [ Key performance areas]

KPI [ Key performance indicators]

KPC [ Key performance criteria]

================================================== ==========

SEVENTH STEP --NOW WE DEVELOP THE PMS

DEVELOPING / MODIFYING

PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

Stage 1 - Review, Modify or Develop the System

1. Convene a design team, and/or contract external expertise to review, modify or develop the system, and coordinate links to other management tools

· Using ‘in-house’ resources and/or external expertise

· Balancing a commitment to maximising participation and consultation with available organisational resources

· Gaining input from a range of experts and users of the system

· Gaining and maintaining support at all levels of the organisation

--------------

2. Perform a needs analysis

· Identifying strengths and weaknesses of existing system

· Determining how the system might be improved

· Deciding on how much change staff will support

· Determining if existing skill base is sufficient to support the system

--------------------------------

3. Clarify the key objectives of the system, and the principles on which the system will be based

· Achieving understanding within the organisation at the outset about why the system is being introduced

· Obtaining input at all levels

· Planning to invest time and effort in overcoming sources of concern

· Identifying benefits to employees and promoting achievements

---------------------------------------

4. Decide which approach or combination of approaches is to be used, and who will be covered by the system.

Undertaking an organisational survey to assess level of organisational readiness

· Determining the relevance and appropriateness of the approach to the organisation’s culture, people management strategy and strategic direction

· Developing the pre-requisite organisational culture and environmental conditions

· Dealing with resistance

· Assessing resource needs/availability for successful implementation

-------------------------------------------------------------------

5. Decide whether or not a pilot is necessary

· The size of the organisation (eg pilot may not be necessary in very small organisations)

· How different the system is compared to any system previously used

· The timeframe for introducing or modifying the system

----------------------------------------------

6. Decide on the components of the performance assessment process

· How often will formal performance assessment and development meetings take place to regularly provide feedback, monitor achievement and adjust performance criteria (eg monthly, quarterly etc).

· What type of feedback approach will be used .

· What will be the format for workplans and record-keeping

· What the mix of organisationally generic and individual/team performance criteria will be

· Whether competencies are to be used

---------------------------------

7. Design the record-keeping, monitoring, compliance and complaints processes

· Ensuring the confidentiality of individual records between the individual and immediate supervisor

· Designing a monitoring process to ensure that fairness and validity are regularly assessed eg developing safeguards such as regular user surveys and reports

· Providing for compliance monitoring

· Establishing a complaint mechanism (eg clear link to organisation’s grievance and harassment process)

· Ensuring confidentiality by deciding who will have access to the aggregated information generated by the performance management system and why

· Deciding how regularly the performance data is to be aggregated, checked against business plans and what process will be used to feed the aggregated data back into the organisational planning process

· Deciding how long to keep information

------------------------------------------------

8. Develop strategies to ensure the system’s status as an integral part of organisational planning and continuous improvement efforts.

Ensuring the timing of the aggregation of performance data is aligned to planning and priority setting processes and to the COPRORATE Management Cycle.

· Including the performance management system as a strand of the organisation’s quality management strategy

· Linking the system to organisational training and development planning by including these as part of workplans

· Including mechanisms to ensure performance acknowledgment eg awards schemes

· Determine what documentation, policies and procedures are needed

================================================== ===============

Stage 2 - Implement the System

1. Develop an implementation plan

Determining the timing in line with the CORPORATE Management Cycle, corporate and business planning, and in relation to any other major organisational development initiatives

· Phasing in the system to ensure that everyone is adequately trained and supported in the introductory phases

-----------------------------------------------

2. Design and implement the promotional strategy

· Counteracting negative prior experiences and perceptions of performance management

· Promoting the system as a means of documenting achievements, and acknowledging and developing performance

· Conducting information sessions for all staff

· Involving the design team as ‘promoters’ and encouraging participation

· Establishing how staff will be informed of progress

-----------------------------------

3. Organise training

Providing training in the interpersonal communication skills of active listening, problem-solving, negotiation and how to give and receive feedback constructively and non-defensively

· Providing practical training in how to develop meaningful performance criteria, and how to assess training and development needs

· Providing training in facilitating performance, managing performance difficulties and acknowledging outstanding performance

· Informing employees about the documentation of the process eg using the forms, maintaining confidentiality

-------------------------------------------

4 Start to use the system (or start the pilot).

· Using several generic performance criteria that relate to current key organisational strategies eg ethical conduct, EEO outcomes, commitment to continuous improvement, quality

· Ensuring that performance criteria are negotiated, and that the managers role to facilitate performance is clear

· Establishing an ‘enquiries’ service to respond to unforeseen problems

· Ensuring readiness of the design team to monitor the system

· Availability of support to users including further training, oversight of development of workplans

· Providing regular reports to all employees on the progress of implementation, as well as any common problems being experienced

================================================== ===============

Stage 3 - Monitor and Evaluate the System

1. Following the pilot or first stage, modify the system in accordance with outcomes

· The adequacy of administrative procedures to support the system

· The effectiveness of record-keeping in terms of clarity, relevance, ease of use and confidentiality

· The quality and usefulness of the performance data generated

· The adequacy of the training provided

--------------------------------------------

2. Analyse the performance data generated

· Cross-checking the aggregated performance data from work groups, teams, units and divisions against business plans and data collected through the compliance monitoring mechanism

· Measuring the extent of linkage that can be identified between work group, team or division performance and overall organisation performance

· Using the evaluation data to identify any inadequacies or problems in the system, and adjusting the system to eliminate the problems

-------------------------------------

3. Monitor equity and impact issues

For example:

· Equity of assessment, especially when there is a link to performance pay;

· Consistency in approach;

· Incidence of grievances;

· Perceptions of the fairness of the system by employees; and

· Impact on EEO groups

-------------------------------------------------

4. Evaluate the effectiveness of the system

· The simplicity of the system

· Nature of training and development needs being identified and addressed

· Adequacy of safeguards against biased or discriminatory practices

· Continually checking that the system is achieving its objectives and reflects the underlying principles

--------------------------------------------

5. Maintain individual and organisational acceptance and commitment to the system.

· Undertaking regular user/organisational surveys to evaluate perceived fairness, relevance, reliability, and equitable application of the system

· Measuring the extent to which motivation and enthusiasm for the system is sustained

· Reporting regularly to the executive of the organisation on the extent of use of the system and the outcomes

· Identifying and reporting on any obvious discrepancies between units and divisions that may reflect local management styles or particular problems requiring attention

· Ensuring regular reports to staff on organisational performance as performance data is aggregated at different levels of the organisation

· Establishing a performance acknowledgment scheme and/or creating incentives through enterprise bargaining at organisational level

--------------------------------------

6. Co-ordinate links to other performance management tools

· Development plans (with training budgets, corporate plans, 360 degree appraisal/ performance agreements)

· Staff surveys

· Client surveys

· Best practice/continuous improvement

· Quality assurance

· Audit reporting

---------------------------------------------

7. Monitor record-keeping system

· Improving the record-keeping system to minimise the administrative workload

· Assessing the usefulness of the information kept

· Checking the security of records

-------------------------------------------------------

8. Monitor the budget and time for resourcing the system

· Time contributed by the members of the design team balanced with the benefits to the organisation

· Cost of training provided to support the system

· Time involved by the employee and assessor in the performance management process

· Costs in administering the system eg record keeping, software etc

----------------------------------------------------------

9. Continuously refine the system

· Considering the need for continued training support, surveys, and safeguards for processing administration matters and record keeping

· Reviewing the performance data generated and the flexibility of the system

· Maintaining the links with the other organisational planning and evaluation processes

--------------------------------------------------

10. Evaluate the effectiveness of the complaints and compliance mechanisms

· Establishing a designated role for a compliance/ evaluation officer or committee to monitor consistency, fairness, and equity in the application of the system

· Including compliance performance criteria in all workplans of supervisors

· Monitoring and reporting on the number and nature of complaints

· Regularly reporting back on compliance targets

==============================================

IN BRIEF, THE ''PMS'' SHOULD INCLUDE

Overview of the Performance Management Process

Performance Planning

Ongoing Feedback

Employee Input

Performance Evaluation

Performance Review

Implementation

Ensure Alignment with Other HR Systems

Get Organizational Members on Board

Communicate

Automate

Pilot Test

Train Employees and Managers

Evaluate and Improve

==================================================

THINGS TO REMEMBER WHILE DEVELOPING ''PMS''

Possible Outcomes from Effective Performance Management [PMS]

�� Clarifying job responsibilities and expectations.

�� Enhancing individual and group productivity.

�� Developing employee capabilities to their fullest extent through effective feedback

and coaching.

�� Driving behavior to align with the organization’s core values, goals and strategy.

�� Providing a basis for making operational human capital decisions (e.g., pay).

�� Improving communication between employees and managers.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Guidelines for Establishing Effective Performance Goals

�� Goals must clearly define the end results to be accomplished.

�� To the extent possible, goals should have a direct and obvious link to organizational

success factors or goals.

�� Goals should be difficult, but achievable, to motivate performance.

�� Goals should be set in no more than three areas—attempting to achieve too many

different goals at once will impede success.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Guidelines for Providing Feedback Effectively

�� Provide immediate positive and developmental feedback in a private location.

�� Ask for the employee’s view about what could have been done differently.

�� Be specific about what behaviors were effective or ineffective.

�� Focus on what the person did or did not do, not personal characteristics.

�� Collaboratively plan steps to address development needs.

�� Offer help in addressing development needs and providing resources.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Guidelines for Writing Employee Accomplishments

�� Include the situation or circumstances faced by the employee.

�� Describe what specific actions the employee took to achieve results.

�� Describe the impact of the accomplishment on the work unit or organization.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Advantages of Performance Standards

�� Communicate key performance factors and expectations.

�� Show distinctions in effectiveness levels that help supervisors explain why an

employee was evaluated in a particular way.

�� Provide a job-relevant basis for evaluating employees, increasing fairness.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Cornerstones of Successful Implementation

�� Ensure alignment with other HR systems. �� Pilot test.

�� Get organizational members on board. �� Train employees and managers.

�� Communicate. �� Evaluate and improve.

�� Automate.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Performance Management Training Topics

�� Philosophy and uses of the system.

�� Description of the rating process.

�� Roles and responsibilities of employees and managers.

�� How to plan performance, set expectations and set goals.

�� How to provide accurate evaluations, minimizing rating errors and rating inflation.

�� The importance of ongoing, constructive, specific behavioral feedback.

�� How to seek feedback effectively from others.

�� How to react to and act on feedback in a constructive manner.

�� How to give feedback in a manner that minimizes defensiveness and maintains selfesteem.

�� How to identify and address development needs.

�� How to use the automated system and related software.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Guidelines for Addressing Legal Requirements

�� Employees must be evaluated on factors that are relevant to their jobs.

�� Employees must be informed about what is expected of them and the standards

against which they will be evaluated at the beginning of the rating cycle.

�� There must be a standard, well-documented procedure for how the performance

management process will be conducted, with defined roles and responsibilities for

employees and managers.

�� Managers and employees should be trained on the performance management

process and relevant skills required to implement the process effectively (e.g., training

for managers on how to provide feedback to employees).

�� Managers should keep records to document examples of effective and, especially,

ineffective employee performance to substantiate their evaluations.

�� Managers should be held accountable for discussing performance issues with

employees and providing them with feedback in a timely manner during the rating

cycle.

�� Performance evaluations should be reviewed by a higher-level manager or panel.

�� The organization should provide a process whereby employees can formally comment

on and appeal their performance evaluations.

�� If performance evaluations are used for decision-making, the evaluation should

be consistent with the decision. For example, individuals who receive higher pay

raises/bonuses should have higher performance ratings than those who receive

lower raises/bonuses.

================================================== =

TO DEVELOP A ''PMS'' STRATEGY THE CEO/SENIOR MANAGEMENT

SHOULD LAY THE GUIDELINES

-IS THE COMPANY STRIVING FOR ''EXCELLENCE''

OR

-IS THE COMPANY STRIVING FOR ''COMPETITIVE POSITIONING''

ETC ETC

Here are the 10 steps for developing an effective performance

management strategy.

The 10 Key Steps in developing an effective performance management strategy:

1. Define what’s driving the need for a performance management solution. Like

the financial institution mentioned above, is the goal of the program to put in place a

succession plan? Is it turning around a poorly performing institution ?

---------------------------------------------------------------------

2. Determine your strategy for moving forward. For example, when Boeing realized

that it was losing ground to chief rival Airbus, the Chicago-based company looked at

the way its employees were organized. It saw that beating Airbus meant Boeing

would have to tap its extended enterprise—strategic partners outside the company, in

the same way that Airbus did. Boeing’s self-examination led to its strategy.

-----------------------------------------------------------

3. Align your business units with your strategy. In banking, mergers and acquisitions

happen at a frenetic pace. If your company has many business units, and some of

these are the result of newly acquired entities, then alignment becomes critical.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

4. Agree on what kind of people you have in the company and what kind of

people you need. Don’t take it for granted that you know your employees’ skill sets.

A discussion with five different managers about an employee will lead to five different

opinions about his or her capabilities.

---------------------------------------------------------------

5. Evaluate employees on consistent criteria. If the rules by which you measure

success change, then you’ll never establish a baseline for employee performance.

And if you don’t have that, you can’t measure progress.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

6. Close the loop and give workers a sense of how they fit into the company’s

strategy, or don’t. Create an open line of communication about the performance

management framework you’ve built. If you have a company intranet, use its home

page to discuss progress and strategy. If your workforce doesn’t have access to

computers, consider a direct-mail campaign that highlights progress. Schedule time

with your direct reports to explain to them how their individual contributions are

affecting a goal of, say, increased sales or improved customer service.

---------------------------------------------------------------------

7. Give employees an opportunity for career growth. Once you’ve crafted your

strategy, aligned your business units and begun communicating goals to workers,

think about the opportunities this creates. As workers get excited about knowing the

company’s overall strategy and their part in it, they’ll want to know what they can do

to advance themselves professionally. Chart a path for workers to use to assume the

roles and responsibilities of the people they work for. Build their confidence with

developmental opportunities.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

8. Link workers’ skills to the job roles. Look at not only the level of skill your

employees and managers possess but also the type of skills they have. For instance,

you may have a very competent accountant in your company who also possesses

fine writing skills. With an understanding of both finance and writing, she might make

an excellent addition to an investor relations department.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

9. Encourage people to behave in a way that will carry the company’s goals

forward. Training will teach people the skills they need, but it won’t change behavior.

That happens when leaders within an organization show that they believe in a

performance management framework and they live it themselves.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

10. Identify gaps and monitor these over time. Identify ways to coach and mentor.

And create a sense of accountability across your employees. Change unsettles many

people, but you can mitigate that uneasiness by putting in place a strategy that

demands that managers become engaged in the development of their charges. Make

your managers mentors, not disciplinarians. When performance gaps arise, see this

as a chance to build a stronger team, and not chastise someone for a shortcoming.

================================================== ==========

SOME USEFUL ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Performance management System

Performance management system is a principal tool in achieving corporate objectives in that it links those objectives with employee goals and achievements. It focuses on improving performance through matching outcomes against individual, departments and organisational objectives, and to the training and development needs of employees at all organisational levels. Managers using performance management system effectively are generally more concerned with performance planning and improvement and performance assessment.



Performance management system is an accepted management practice operating within organizations because it can be a valuable process for employees and employers alike. It provides for both recognition of high performance and early detection of performance that is not meeting expectations, allowing prompt remedial action to be taken.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Benefits of performance management system

At a macro level performance management assists organisations to match outcomes with COMPANY objectives. It provides a system for improving ORGANIZATION performance and outcomes, within the COMPANY’s OBJECTIVES and policy framework, while maintaining good industrial relations. It generates benefits throughout organisational functions and processes.

Performance management system recognises that people are the organisation’s most valuable resource, and that people are the key to an innovative, professional and service-oriented public service. Performance management emphasises the relationship between the management and development of people and an effective organisation, and provides a fair and equitable environment for improving performance.

A performance management system

-links achievements at all levels of the organisation with corporate, business and DEPARTMENTAL objectives.

It provides the framework for:

·clarifying expectations, roles, responsibilities and resources required to achieve goals;

·improving communication and understanding between managers and employees in terms of work requirements, expectations, performance criteria and achievements;

*linking individual, team or unit performance with quality assurance, continuous improvement and evaluation processes of the organisation;

·facilitating, encouraging and assessing performance;

·encouraging structured feedback from employees and supervisors on performance and career planning and from the community on organisational performance;

·introducing an outcomes focused culture and increasing motivation;

·collecting data and information needed for management decision making or external review (eg by auditors);

·increasing the organisation’s capability to meet future requirements and to improve outcomes for the community;

·identifying performance which requires improvement; and

· recognising and acknowledging performance.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Performance management SYSTEM reflects the value of people to organisational performance, including:

1. performance of individuals / departments

2. employee skill levels / gaps if any.



3. employee position in the development plans.

4. corporate values, goals and ethical standards are clearly reflected in the performance management system;

5. Clear identification of expectations and responsibilities of individuals

6.employee allocated responsibility for ensuring improvement and performance strategies at all levels of the organisation.

7.specific expectations and responsibilities of managers, supervisors, teams and individuals for their role in the process.

8. Linking the individual’s contribution to organisational objectives

9. training and development are linked to the achievement of optimal organisational and individual performance;

10. the system is regularly reviewed, with particular attention given to key elements (eg process of reviewing individual performance; provision of helpful feedback; updating of key accountabilities, criteria and indicators; and training and development plans);

11. accountability is assigned to senior managers to ensure that performance, outcomes and training and development activities (relating to individuals, teams or units) are appropriate .

12. employee workplans contain agreed, clear and measurable performance criteria which are modified as changes occur in organisation policies, priorities or environment;

13. the system enables assessment of the individual’s contribution to the achievement of corporate goals;

14. transparent links exist between performance assessment and performance reward;

15. the system is clearly linked to the organisation’s strategic management framework and is not treated as an isolated function;

etc etc .



PMS provides

-as a valuable input to skills inventories for manpower planning;

-helps to identify what to pay and what will serve as an equitable monetary package;

-helps to clarify who could be trained

-helps to determine who could be promoted

-provides the development planning

Development planning is the process of creating experiences for your employees that promote skills and knowledge related to the position, as well as to professional growth.

Development plans draw from the Performance Evaluation:

Performance goals or needs (deficiencies) to be addressed

The employee, with supervisor assistance, identifies ways to achieve those goals and/or address performance deficiencies in systematic ways

Address opportunities for professional growth

Agreement and/or commitment between employee and supervisor

Planned follow-up

Such a system includes several components:

individual employee work plans,

work profile

development plans,

an education/training program,

a performance management and pay history.

Interim Performance Review

Annual Performance Review

THIS IS WHY IS ''PMS'' IS SO VITAL FOR THE

DEVELOPMENT OF HR PLANNING /MANPOWER PLANNING BECAUSE

IT PROVIDES THE BASIS/ BASIC/ FUTURE REQUIREMENTS

OF HUMAN RESOURCES.

================================================== =============

YOU CAN ALSO LINK/ INCLUDE

-SUCCESSION PLANNING PROGRAMS.

-TALENT MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS.

AS PART OF THIS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM.

==================================================

POSITION : MANAGER - TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT

HERE ARE SOME BROADGUIDELINE ON SKILLS.

Demonstrated ability to think both strategically and at a more operational level

Demonstrated group facilitation skills up to executive level

Sound knowledge of the concepts, principles, practices, and techniques related to learning and development, organizational behaviour, organizational culture, leadership and team development practices and ability to translate into practical programs

Sound knowledge of human resource functions, practices, policies, programs and performance technology

Ability to establish and maintain excellent internal and external relationships in a highly collaborative and customer service oriented manner

Highly professional and positive attitude

Excellent communication, interpersonal and organizational skills

Ability to multitask in a high pressure, deadline driven environment

Ability to work independently with minimal supervision

Ability to maintain strict confidentiality and use discretion, diplomacy and tact

Strong computer skills including: MS Word, Excel and Power Point

================================================== ========

PERFORMANCE CRITERIA

1.Leads effectively, including demonstrated

· ability to plan, prepare, promote deliver and evaluate innovative learning and development activities consistent with Company’s vision, purpose and business objectives

· ability to lead change and innovation

· commitment to and ability to model the behaviours required by the CO.s Values, CO.s Code of Conduct and the CO.s Leadership Values

--------------------------------------------------------------------

2.Communicates with influence, including the ability to

· represent COMPANY with credibility and professionalism

· think on your feet and communicate clearly verbally and in writing

· negotiate persuasively

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

3.Achieves results, with demonstrated capacity to

· manage projects, organise information, monitor progress and meet deadlines

· motivate self and others to achieve results

· provide professional/specialist/technical expertise and knowledge

· support the delivery of CO.’s learning and development programs to achieve business outcomes.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

4. Builds and maintains relationships, in particular, skills in

· delivering quality customer service

· developing and maintaining productive internal and external relationships, partnerships and networks

· working effectively as a team member, contributing to both the formulation and achievement of team, business and corporate goals

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

5. Manages self, in particular the ability to

· under limited direction, develop innovative and creative approaches and solutions to address learning and development needs for staff in COMPANY and for THE external customers

· accept responsibility and accountability

· manage and progress own ongoing learning and development

================================================== =======================

TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT KRAs and KPIs.

KRA 1-deliver relevant and targeted programs to the

organization employees.

KPI 1--EMPLOYEE SATISFACTION FEEDBACK THROUGH SURVEY

SATISFACTION LEVEL MINIMUM 70%.

KPI 2--% INCREASE INCREASE IN TRAINING PROGRAMS

KPI 3--% INCREASE IN EMPLOYEE PARTICIPATION.

===============================================

KRA 2-promote the programs/learning culture

KPI 1--EMPLOYEE SATISFACTION FEEDBACK THROUGH SURVEY

SATISFACTION LEVEL MINIMUM 70%.

KPI 2--NUMBER OF DEPARTMENTS SATISFACTION LEVEL.

KPI 3--% INCREASE IN TYPES OF ACTIVITIES

===============================================

KRA 3-provide lead in the provision of

organization learning and development service

KPI 1--NO. OF TRAINING DAYS % INCREASE

KPI 2--NO. OF EMPLOYEES PARTICIPATING % INCREASE

KPI 3--NO. OF INHOUSE PROGRAMS % INCREASE

KPI 4--NO. OF EXTERNAL PROGRAMS ATTENDED %INCREASE.

KPI 5--NO. OF EXTERNAL TRAINING PACKAGES BOUGHT %INCREASE.

KPI 6--% INCREASE IN COST.

KPI 7--% INCREASE IN RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS.

================================================

KRA 4-improvements in capabilities/capacities

to deliver L&D.

KPI 1--PROGRAMS IMPLEMENTED ON TIME [ % ]

KPI 2--PROGRAMS IMPLEMENTED WITHIN BUDGET [ %]

KPI 3--EFFECTIVE USE OF PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT

SYSTEM FOR DEVELOPMENT [ % ]

================================================

REGARDS

LEO LINGHAM

Take a BOW Mr. Leo...
You deserve it...
Even a totally uninitiated person like me knows something about KRA, KPA, KPIs
You deserve more than just praise.
But I dont know what more is possible.
With TRUE REGARDS


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