Dear Seniors, I have 8+yrs of experience in Hr & Admin profile, Almost all the Dept in HR(Only not in statutory compliance). I did MBA(HR) after that LLB too. Now I am looking for a job change, if I applied for a Manufacturing organization they rejected me because of no prior experience in compliance.
If I go for the corporate sector there they doubted on my LLB degree there also i got rejected.
So I was confused about what to do. I did LLB only for further growth in HR.

From India, Noida

Understand the behavioral aspects at individual as well as organizational level →
Promoted: IIM Raipur Executive Development Program In Human Resource Management
Dear Naresh,

Your MBA(HR) with LLB degree is enough for HR. The qualification is not the sole criteria for any job without some experience.

You got 8+yrs of experience in HR & Admn but do not know about statutory compliance means you are absolutely empty within, the rejection is justified. The expectation would be at higher side from the employer owing to multiple degree.

Therefore, you need to know the HR functions involved in a Manufacturing unit (ID Act, Gratuity Act, Payment of wages Act, Contract labour Act, Factories Act & welfare measure, EPF & ESI, Trade Union Act, The Industrial Employment(Standing Orders) Act, The Apprentice Act and Employees Compensation Act). Now you have to do with newly framed Four Codes include the Code on Wages, 2019, the Industrial Relations Code, 2020, the Occupational Safety, Health and Working Conditions Code, 2020 and the Code on Social Security, 2020.

There is nothing to loose heart or get confused for not getting selected, rather you come to know what exactly post requires and prepare yourself accordingly.

From India, Mumbai
Dear Naresh,

When a candidate applies for any post, he/she must be ready for his/her candidature getting turned down (not rejected, please note). Against this backdrop, if your candidature, if turned down, does not mean that your worth gets reduced. The mismatch between the candidate's profile and the expectations of the interviewer are common. Therefore, do not lower your spirit.

Though you have acquired a degree in law, you do not have practical exposure to statutory compliance. But then there are thousands of HR professionals like you. Anyway, try to improve your knowledge of labour laws. Secondly, if you are weak in statutory compliance then you may not search for a job in the manufacturing sector. You may search in the service industry.

Coming to doubt being raised on your LLB degree. The doubt could have been raised because of the lack of exposure to the legal field. Since you have not worked in the legal department, a doubt might have been raised. Nevertheless, after acquiring a professional field like law or any other field, one has to remain in touch with that field. This can be done by reading magazines, books, articles etc. Have you done that?

When the students study for some professional course, they just study for acquiring a certain percentage or class. Once they get the degree, the books remain closed. However, a little do they realise that a professional's real journey begins after acquiring the degree and not before.

The person also should be recognised by the way one carries oneself. In regular dealing, whether the person uses the terminology of a particular field or not matters a lot. I have seen a large number of MBAs who hardly can be called MBAs because of their inability to differentiate from non-MBAs.

Lastly, please note the English proverb, reading maketh a man. After reading, you should be able to express that knowledge in day to day life as well. No problem, take failure as a lesson. Work hard. You will succeed.

All the best!

Dinesh Divekar

From India, Bangalore
Anonymous
5496

Dear Naresh,

On hand experience or exposure to solving problems is certainly a must for any professional degree holder. A law degree holder is not an exception for like any other professional/technical subject, law is also a vast one and one cannot be a master of all its branches. Even in lawyering, a Civil lawyer cannot handle a criminal case as effectively as a Criminal lawyer would do. Even among civil lawyers, one is specialized in tax matters, some other is specialized in Constitutional matter, yet some other is a stalwart in labor/service matters. The same situation prevails in the Judiciary also. Therefore, your degree is a mere passport but the visa is your in-depth knowledge of a particular branch of law which is associated with your profession. Experience is the application of theoretical knowledge to practical situation to get a desired result. As a HR manager handling industrial relations, you have to be well conversant not only with the compliance aspect of labor laws, but also should be thorough with the effects of non-compliance. While handling an industrial dispute, you should be well aware of the nuances of a conflict and be more concerned about the effects of its continued non-resolution rather than its quick-fix type of solution. So just an LLB to your credentials alone cannot make you an effective industrial relations manager. You should be familiar with important case laws. When you are interviewed, hypothetical questions would be put to you from case laws only to assess your legal bent of mind. Your positive answer can make up your non-experience and make the impression that you are a potential contender for the position. What I have mentioned is only an example. HR problems vary according to the type of the industry. Therefore, as a HR manager, it is not enough that you are thorough with routine administrative matters; you should be a motivator, trainer, co-ordinator, problem solver, easily accessible and so on and on.

In my work experience, I have seen many effective Personnel Managers ( as they were called then) with no law degree but countered questions of law in conflict situations about statutory compliance more effectively than a lawyer but ever ready for a compromise which was beneficial to both sides out of practical wisdom which does not always come from past experience only but also the ability to visualise the future.

Therefore, if you bank more upon an LLB to be a HR manager of a manufacturing industry, it should supplement and complement your MBA(HR) in all the aspects of the job to the extent wherever necessary.

From India, Salem

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