Our weekly off is Thursday if we have taken leave on 16th august 2017 then what is the leave rule ? We have counted leave between 15th august holiday and Thursday 17th august 2017 is our weekly off (between holiday and weekly off) and Friday come to office what is the leave rule as per factory act?
7th August 2017 From India , Sholapur

Dear Nil,

Please note, it is allowed to do so but many companies have their internal leave policies as per which sandwich leave is not allowed. Thus please check for your internal leave policy as well.
7th August 2017
Factories Act is silent on this issue.Please check your state Act on national holidays for Aug 15th.
8th August 2017 From India, Thiruvananthapuram
dear member

actually you want to take the leave on 16 th of august 2017 i.e between 15 th august which is national holiday and 17 th Aug which is your weekly off right,Now According to the rule one need to present on the duty/office Either prior to the day of weekly off or after the very next day of the weekly off to avail the benefit of your weekly off.

here the case is 15 th august which is national holiday
16 th you want to avail the leave
17 th which is your weekly off
& if on 18 th you reported the office your 16 th aug 2017 will consider as leave or else if you unable to attend the duty on friday 18 th Aug 2017 then the 16 th Aug 2017 will be considered as also leave.

seniors kindly focus according to the factory act and apprise me too.

regards
ravi
8th August 2017 From India, Nagpur
Mr.Ravi
Which rule of Factories Act or other Acts say that one should be on duty either on the day prior to weekly off or on the day after weekly off,to avail the benefit of weekly off.
8th August 2017 From India, Thiruvananthapuram
Anonymous 
sir

i have express what we follow in our organisation for the worker only.kindly apprise me and correct if it is going wrong.

regards
ravi
8th August 2017 From India, Nagpur
to
Mr.varghesemathew sir

the little explanation regarding my post no.4 in connection of "one should be on duty either on the day prior to weekly off or on the day after weekly off,to avail the benefit of weekly off." i have studied the interpretation in my support and try to elaborate it sir,which is as follows.

Legally and logically, there are two factors to be kept in mind before taking a decision on this subject.

1. Does your establishment fall under Factories Act or Shops and Establishments Act?

2. Do you use 30 or 26 as denominator for calculating one day wages for loss of pay

Factories Act and using 26 as denominator

Most of the factories follow this for workmen. Let me recall here that Factories Act does not provide for PAID WEEKLY OFF. Logically one can not deduct wages for a day when he or she is not paid for the same. When one uses 26 as denominator, it excludes weekly off. Hence, intervening weekly off will be excluded and will not be counted

Shops and Establishments Act/Factories Act using 30 as denominator

Shops Act is more liberal in terms of number of days of leave. This legislation also provides for paid weekly off. Hence one uses 30 as denominator. Some of the Factories also use 30 as denominator. There are conditions provided for Paid weekly off like an employee is eligible for one day Paid off if he or she has worked for the entire week. Hence if an employee takes even one day leave in a week, he or she is not eligible for Paid weekly off. Hence legally and logically it is correct to include intervening weekly off with Casual leave or Earned Leave or Medical Leave.

your precious comment in the connection is also welcome sir.

Regards
ravi
9th August 2017 From India, Nagpur
 

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