Tajsateesh
Recruitment/talent Acquisition, Career Counselling
ACT
Training, Motivational Speaker, Writing,
B K BHATIA
Director Of Company
Samvedan
Consultancy_hr & Ir
Vijayk11
Head Of People Excellence
+3 Others

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Hello Seniors,

Greetings!! I am very thankful that previously you all helped me in my all kinds of queries. I am here again with some questions which are wandering in my mind.

I have 2.6 years of experience in HR field and during my this tenure i found that I have keen interest in training or teaching , counselling part.Also I am loosing interest in my regular mundane work as I don't feel that much interest in those work (here I am especially talking about the person's liking or interest; as some times it happens that after going through some work people came to know about their interest area). Well, now what I am thinking to move my career in teaching as well as to go for further studies( as knowledge is very important to grow, and by teaching I can further improve my skills too).

Wish to get your opinion on this whether is it a right time or may I have to wait for sometime (if sometime then approximately how much experience is required?). Secondly whether teaching first or study first or both can go in parallel ?

Hope you will spare your valuable time to guide me!!

Thanks,

Swati

Hi
You have not shared the most important information as to what your qualifications are. If you want to teach in college you would need post graduation and would have to clear your SET and/ or NET.
In any case I think by the time you get ready for a fresh shot at formal academics (post graduation or doctoral ) possibly around June you would have completed 3 years of working experience.
Your next line of action would be dependent on your current age, your current qualifications, the kind of academics you wish to pursue, the type of teaching career you plan to take up not to mention a whole set of personal variables like family support, financial needs etc.
I have shared my thoughts with you so that you can put in the missing links and then write down your personal and professional goals. This will give you a more concrete platform to make a rational decision.
Best Wishes

Hello Swati,
First & foremost, you don't need to be apologetic about opting for a teaching profession after working as a HR in a corporate environment--ABSOLUTELY NOTHING WRONG in this.
At the End-of-Day, anyone/everyone needs to opt for a job/activity that SATISFIES him/her.
Coming to your actual query, pl give more details that B.Jacob mentioned. More the inputs, better the accuracy of any suggestions/advice of the members.
Rgds,
TS

Thank you so much for your suggestions.
Well, I am PGDM and as far as family support and financial needs is concern, then by God's grace it is fine. My goal is that I want to see my self as Behavioral trainer but to move in this direction, my steps include teaching, gaining more qualification. Or would you all suggest me another path for it.
And once again question is still there is it right time for that?
Thanks!

Hello,

The direct answer to your question is, NO, it is NOT the right time to switch over!

You have a PGDM and 2.6 years of hands on experience. You have not shared details of this experience.

This is important as at this stage of a career one would generally be burdened with routine work, compliance and any other task but in a secondary level.

If your experience is an exception, you are fortunate.

You desire to be a "behavioral trainer" as you express.

Behavior is a function of personality and environment!

A PGDM, with due respects to the institute does NOT impart deeper knowledge of Human Psychology or Sociology for that matter.

To be an effective trainer your knowledge base has to be sound. If it is reinforced with real time experience, you are better equipped to take on this career of a Behavioral Trainer!

I feel you should acquire formal qualification from a reputed university in the area of psychology, organizational behavior before you launch in this interesting and tremendously satisfying career!

Do I sound discouraging! But it for your good!

India's leading industrialists/entrepreneurs of the yesteryear, never went to a management Institute yet, created massive industrial empire-mostly on the strength of "common sense" (which is not very common anyway!). But their next generations are properly educated/trained to take the industry further and to keep the flag flying high all the time!

Confidence coupled with burning desire and common sense is GOOD but if you are able to also add a sound knowledge base it will be BETTER!

If you do not wish to give up a job ( and I am not recommending that at all), you may register for a doctorate and pursue studies in this channel and hopefully within a couple of years of achieving a doctorate, you are due to take off on your chosen path with better chances of SUCCESS!

Think about it!

Regards

samvedan

December 22, 2012

-------------------------------

Dear Swati
Based on given information ...
Please listen to your heart. You does not seems to be too much in need of Job or money OR too many years into it. Get a formal education from reputed university and then plunge into teaching job. Doing parallel may hinder you in excelling in the learning and acquiring knowledge.
Taking risk is sometimes difficult but understand that - Darr ke aage/ baad hi Jeet hai ! And you seems to have all support from family side. So take a plunge.
Regards
Vijay

Hi Swati,

I wish to bring to your notice (as researched by Daniel Gulati & given in blog) ' The Top Five Career Regrets '

1. I wish I hadn't taken the job for the money. By far the biggest regret of all came from those who opted into high-paying but ultimately dissatisfying careers. Compensation is a "hygiene" factor, not a true motivator.

2. I wish I had quit earlier. Almost uniformly, those who had actually quit their jobs to pursue their passions wished they had done so earlier. Variable reinforcement schedules prevalent in large corporations, the visibility of social media, and the desire to log incremental gains are three reasons that the 80% of people dissatisfied with their jobs don't quit when they know they should.

3. I wish I had the confidence to start my own business. As their personal finances shored up, professionals I surveyed yearned to become an owner, not an employee in someone else's company. 70% of workers wished their current job would help them with starting a business in the future, yet only 15% said they had what it takes to actually venture out on their own. Even Fortune 500 CEOs dream of entrepreneurial freedom. Admitted one: "My biggest regret is that I'm a 'wantrepreneur.' I never got to prove myself by starting something from scratch."

4. I wish I had used my time at school more productively. Roughly 86% of students still view college as a worthwhile investment. This is reflected in the growing popularity of college: 54% of Millennials have college degrees, compared to 36% of Boomers. Although more students are attending college, many of the group's participants wished they had thoughtfully parlayed their school years into a truly rewarding first job, recounting college experience as "I was in a ridiculous hurry to complete what in hindsight were the best and most delightfully unstructured years of my life.".

5. I wish I had acted on my career hunches. Several individuals recounted windows of opportunity in their careers, or "now-or-never moments."

Far from being suppressed, career regrets should hold a privileged place in your emotional repertoire.

In brief I suggest you to opt for the CAREER OF YOUR CHOICE as this will make you EXCEL in your work and IMPROVE YOU CHANCES OF SUCCESS

Hi Swati,

I wish to bring to your notice (as researched by Daniel Gulati & given in blog) ' The Top Five Career Regrets '

1. I wish I hadn't taken the job for the money. By far the biggest regret of all came from those who opted into high-paying but ultimately dissatisfying careers. Compensation is a "hygiene" factor, not a true motivator.

2. I wish I had quit earlier. Almost uniformly, those who had actually quit their jobs to pursue their passions wished they had done so earlier. Variable reinforcement schedules prevalent in large corporations, the visibility of social media, and the desire to log incremental gains are three reasons that the 80% of people dissatisfied with their jobs don't quit when they know they should.

3. I wish I had the confidence to start my own business. As their personal finances shored up, professionals I surveyed yearned to become an owner, not an employee in someone else's company. 70% of workers wished their current job would help them with starting a business in the future, yet only 15% said they had what it takes to actually venture out on their own. Even Fortune 500 CEOs dream of entrepreneurial freedom. Admitted one: "My biggest regret is that I'm a 'wantrepreneur.' I never got to prove myself by starting something from scratch."

4. I wish I had used my time at school more productively. Roughly 86% of students still view college as a worthwhile investment. This is reflected in the growing popularity of college: 54% of Millennials have college degrees, compared to 36% of Boomers. Although more students are attending college, many of the group's participants wished they had thoughtfully parlayed their school years into a truly rewarding first job, recounting college experience as "I was in a ridiculous hurry to complete what in hindsight were the best and most delightfully unstructured years of my life.".

5. I wish I had acted on my career hunches. Several individuals recounted windows of opportunity in their careers, or "now-or-never moments."

Far from being suppressed, career regrets should hold a privileged place in your emotional repertoire.

In brief I suggest you to opt for the CAREER OF YOUR CHOICE as this will make you EXCEL in your work and IMPROVE YOU CHANCES OF SUCCESS

Amin Paniwala

If your interest is to become a 'Corporate Trainer' in the area of 'behavioral competencies/ soft skills', it may be better to interact with agencies/ individuals providing such services (examples: Shiv Khera, ZEN INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT, DOOR Training and Consulting India (P) Ltd, GROWMORE Consultancy & many others in different parts of the country). Visit those nearest to you & sense their interest in your profile. This informal evaluation may indicate if you are thinking in the right direction. Join some of their programs while working in your present company & see what it all means to be a trainer.
If your interest is to become a lecturer in a management institute, it is a different scenario altogether. Many learned people have already shared their views above.
After being clear in your options, think of further studies to refine your academic profile or be a part of some corporate trainers organization.

Hi..! Swati,
I m here spreading my opinion about ur said that Study is never ending Process and Human always learning something new by every day so carry on your studies with your job,even lot of Distance education also stand for your assistance.
Come to improvements of your skills, yet u may have ideas about skills and counseling way,steps and rapport, and required skills in respected sphere, u just make it practical to improve yourself for the top Level.
Eventually,it's your personal decision so discuss with your family members and collect the total opinion on same.
Just Enjoy the life and Play with your Job..!!!
Thanks & Regards
Seeatarama Moger
+917306312357


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