360 Degree Performance Appraisal Method- How Successful It Is? - CiteHR
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Thank you for most valuable insights Dayanand & Namobita, here I would like to add that 360 degree appraisal are mostly implemented (for every position )by big firms, as it is a very time consuming process not every company can afford the time or resources requied to do it.

Also based on 360degree feedback these firms have to set assessment centres, to be this kind of appriasal successful, so as to guide the employees who do not score at the required percentile by these firms. And to handle these assessments trained people are requierd, that means the designated employees required to do assessment must be trained by an expert on behavioural evaluation, these employees must not be from HR itself but can be line manager or senior managers looking after other departments/operations within the organisation. Now that again involves lot of time and money.

360degree feedback system is mandatoryly for organisational development and not for salary review, hence they highlight the area where the individual is lacking or why someone is doing well and can those areas are systematically identified and worked upon benefiting both the organisation and employee to develop teh employees potential in more positive direction.

Most companies still have 90degree or 180degree appraisals but in some form or other the presence of 360 can also be found along with these PMS, for instance in all the organisations I have worked so far, the 360degree were applicable to those employees who are either working at the client's site or are working with client/vendor directly on some project. (I am talking about IT SW & SW services). In these instances it was a necessity to know the feedback of the client or TP vedor to assess the individual's performance & behaviour.

I had once worked with a large FMCG company where the 360degree was present but only in form where the managers were being assessed by their peers,seniors, colleagues and by people who directly reported to the manager. At the end of the cycle the GM gave them the report, there was no mention of anyones name, neither the department of the people who gave the feedback (that was confidential & was available only with the GM), only different areas where the manager was thought to be good or well, not so good. That was very effective, some managers were immediately on the defensive, some showed indifference and some very enthusiastic that they know the area of improvement where they are lacking and where they are exceeding. It was indeed the comitment of the top management which saw that the process/system was permanenet and consistent inspite of some very aggresive comments from some very successful managers to discontinue it.

Looking forward to more intersting additions.

warm reagrds
Sourabh
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Very interesting discussion and excellent inputs from Mr. Dayanand, Ms, Archna, Ms. (Cite Contribution), Mr. Saurabh and others...

What I perceived from the discussion that this tool definitely involves lot of energy and resources to implement. I also assume that if managed properly this can be a very good developmental tool (as Saurabh mentioned about using assessment centers).

(1) Transperacny can be an issue!!!! But at the other hand I also understand is the enforcement of desired behavior, say it with customer or the peer group.

(2) Authenticity: If we use it for some of the departments how the overall authenticity of appraisals be addresed where other departents are using some other methods.

Even I have never been part of such a system where 360 is implemented or about to implement. So, the discussion is trigerring various thoughts.

I request the members who have been part of 360 mechanism to share some long term implications...how cost and benfits are driven by it (even if it is long term). I will second Saurabh about running assessment and development centers along with 360...but does it work without these. May be L&D strategies can be helpful.

I feel that such practices are more welcomed in sutainable and bigger organizations. To me it also looks like forced standardized desired bahvior in the system ( I am not opposing it but managing this would be a big challenge).
Dear Friends
In our country, it is not possible to implement 360 degree appraisal system. Because the work culture is such. Whatever happening in office we all are carrying the same to home too and whatever said in work time we are taking it as personal and as like pepsi advertisement...... we are telling 'NOTHING OFFICIAL ABOUT IT' and everything we take it as personal remarks.
There is a two line kavita.........
Rishwat liya - pakada gaya
Rishwat diya - choda gaya
Whatever we are assessing about our superiors it will be immediately flashed to our seniors during tea time by our colleagues themselves means what will be our stand.
So it cannot be possible to implement the same in our country.
Hi
thanks to give me chance to say some point related to the HR topic 360 performances management tool .
the method is effective for multinational company large scale company even for goverment agency and deparment if they adopt it .if goverment department adopt that method then the performances of goverment department enhances.it has some reservation but fair enough every thing have some bits missing .people training in the organization can be determine by that method also
Dear All
Please visit my new thread which is related to current thread and post your valuable suggestions.
https://www.citehr.com/324194-unique...ml#post1478371
With profound regards
Thank Saurabh for explaining the system very well, i completely agree with you that 360 can work as an assessment tool.
Thanks Rahul for your inputs and thoughts...
Thank you Mr. Simhan for sharing wonderful links, i really like them a lot specially the second one....
Let us see if we get any more valuable inputs from other members on this, their experience while woking on 360 tool....failures and successes....
Regards,
Archna
In my previous co, we had 360 deg appraisal. It was successful in what it had to do (from a business perspective). It was an appraisal, but people who work for 15-20 years don't change. So, fine, there is the appraisal and it helps the business, but it doesn't particularly help improve the company atmosphere or culture. Further, it promotes politicking to a great extent... So, there are many negatives that one needs to be cautious about.
The other aspect is that you need to be cautious about how you leverage this tool. And you are right, in family owned businesses, this maynot work well. So, you might have to restrict yourself to strictly professionally owned companies.
Advantages of 360 degree feedback
* Combined opinion gives an accurate, objective, and well-rounded view.
* Some skills, such as leadership, are best judged by subordinates and peers rather than superiors.
* Comments are difficult to ignore when expressed by a number of colleagues.
* It can lead to positive behaviour changes, such as more openness and honesty.
* It can be motivating for people who undervalue themselves.
Disadvantages of 360 degree feedback
* It is time-consuming and costly, so the technique is often restricted to management levels.
* If too many appraisers are used, the results can be difficult to interpret.
* It can be destructive unless handled carefully and sensitively.
* It can generate an environment of suspicion, unless managed openly and honestly.
Action checklist
1. Decide which behaviours you want to measure and whom to assess
Consider which sets of knowledge, skills and abilities you want to measure: for example, should they be competency-based, job-related, or behaviour-related? Remember that 360 degree appraisal can be used at any level of the organisation, so decide if you want to assess specific individuals, particular teams, particular levels, or the whole organisation. Is it important that everyone who takes part as an appraiser should also be subject to appraisal?
2. Design a feedback questionnaire
It is common to use a written questionnaire to collect appraisals, as this is the least time-consuming method. Devise the detailed questions or, if you do not have the necessary expertise in-house, consider buying in a ready-made questionnaire or employing a consultant. Check that the questions are phrased to elicit a descriptive, rather than a judgmental, response, as the former is less likely to give offence and more likely to provide information for the appraisee to act upon. Also, avoid asking questions which the majority of the likely appraisers are not qualified to answer or which contain terms that might be open to misinterpretation.
3. Communicate the scheme and prepare participants
Explain the purpose of the scheme and encourage the airing of worries and objections. If necessary, circulate a pilot questionnaire asking employees, for example, for their views on managers in the organisation in general. This will serve to demonstrate how the scheme will work and to give reassurance. Appoint a manager to act as a facilitator and publicise his or her roles and responsibilities. This person should be widely respected and have a good reputation for fairness and honesty. If it is not appropriate to nominate an internal manager, consider using a consultant.
4. Train all appraisers in giving, and appraisees in receiving, critical feedback.
Encourage appraisers to be constructive, positive and specific, rather than being critical, negative and general. In describing a colleague's behaviour, for example, "I notice that you rarely acknowledge us when you arrive in the morning" is more helpful than "I think you are a bad communicator". "I note that you need time and space to yourself but when you get it you can really produce the goods" pinpoints the message in an acceptable way, which should be better received than "You're too much of a loner". Do not allow the appraisal to become an opportunity for subjective gripes. If you do, critically appraised people will tend to get their own back when appraising others, especially if they are identified or identifiable.
5. Let the appraisee choose their appraisers
Allow the employee to select who is to appraise them from an agreed pool, but ensure that those chosen include people with whom they do and don't get on: the aim is to achieve a rounded appraisal. Set limits on the number involved in each appraisal, as otherwise the exercise can become an administrative nightmare. Instruct appraisers to return their questionnaires to the appointed facilitator. If it has been agreed that all comments will be treated anonymously, reassure them that their views will not be attributed specifically to them. Minimise the gap between collecting the data and giving the results.
6. Decide how feedback is to be presented
Work out how the results are to be collated and presented by the facilitator: is your objective to allow employees to be able to compare their own performance over time, compare themselves with like employees, or compare themselves against a set of competences? Consider whether feedback on particular actions is to be linked to a consensus on how important that action is to the job. If so, the results will have to be weighted accordingly.
7. Provide counselling and assistance
Decide whether improvement actions should be left to individuals or whether they should be offered solutions. If you wish to load the emphasis for improvement on to individuals, don't show the results to their boss without their approval. The facilitator or another trained person such as a psychologist should be available to help employees deal with feedback, particularly to advise on how to deal with diverging views. Consider whether to hold development sessions in which appraisees can offer support to each other.
8. Set action plans for improvement
Follow up appraisal with a programme of suitable training. This may range from attending a course, or sitting with a colleague, to internal or external secondment. Remember that learners will have different needs and preferences.
9. Evaluate the use of 360 degree feedback
Examine the appraisal, taking into account the thoughts of all participants, including any difficulties that arose in completing the appraisal questionnaire or in analysing the data from it. Compare the results of using 360 degree feedback with previous appraisal schemes. Details from the evaluation should be acknowledged when undertaking the next appraisal.
Dos and don'ts of 360 degree feedback
Do
* Make the exercise non-threatening by focusing on strengths as much as weaknesses.
* Respect the confidentiality of respondents' replies--if this has been agreed.
* Prepare and support people for their different roles--as appraiser, appraisee, and facilitator.
Don't
* Allow appraisers to drift into personal attacks.
* Treat it as a one-off exercise or leave long gaps between appraisals.
* Forget that employees may find the introduction of 360 degree feedback both threatening and challenging.
Glossary of terms related to 360 degree feedback
Peer appraisal: employees are evaluated by their colleagues and their supervisor.
Team appraisal: team members assess their own team's performance. Feedback should preferably also come from representatives of clients of the team and from a supervisor.
Upward feedback: managers are appraised by those who work under them.
540 degree appraisal: two further perspectives are used in addition to those in 360 degree appraisal: customers and suppliers. Where the majority of a manager's time is spent with either of these two groups, inclusion of their observations makes feedback more useful and believable to the individual.
Advantages of 360 degree feedback

* Combined opinion gives an accurate, objective, and well-rounded view.

* Some skills, such as leadership, are best judged by subordinates and peers rather than superiors.

* Comments are difficult to ignore when expressed by a number of colleagues.

* It can lead to positive behaviour changes, such as more openness and honesty.

* It can be motivating for people who undervalue themselves.

Disadvantages of 360 degree feedback

* It is time-consuming and costly, so the technique is often restricted to management levels.

* If too many appraisers are used, the results can be difficult to interpret.

* It can be destructive unless handled carefully and sensitively.

* It can generate an environment of suspicion, unless managed openly and honestly.

Action checklist

1. Decide which behaviours you want to measure and whom to assess

Consider which sets of knowledge, skills and abilities you want to measure: for example, should they be competency-based, job-related, or behaviour-related? Remember that 360 degree appraisal can be used at any level of the organisation, so decide if you want to assess specific individuals, particular teams, particular levels, or the whole organisation. Is it important that everyone who takes part as an appraiser should also be subject to appraisal?

2. Design a feedback questionnaire

It is common to use a written questionnaire to collect appraisals, as this is the least time-consuming method. Devise the detailed questions or, if you do not have the necessary expertise in-house, consider buying in a ready-made questionnaire or employing a consultant. Check that the questions are phrased to elicit a descriptive, rather than a judgmental, response, as the former is less likely to give offence and more likely to provide information for the appraisee to act upon. Also, avoid asking questions which the majority of the likely appraisers are not qualified to answer or which contain terms that might be open to misinterpretation.

3. Communicate the scheme and prepare participants

Explain the purpose of the scheme and encourage the airing of worries and objections. If necessary, circulate a pilot questionnaire asking employees, for example, for their views on managers in the organisation in general. This will serve to demonstrate how the scheme will work and to give reassurance. Appoint a manager to act as a facilitator and publicise his or her roles and responsibilities. This person should be widely respected and have a good reputation for fairness and honesty. If it is not appropriate to nominate an internal manager, consider using a consultant.

4. Train all appraisers in giving, and appraisees in receiving, critical feedback.

Encourage appraisers to be constructive, positive and specific, rather than being critical, negative and general. In describing a colleague's behaviour, for example, "I notice that you rarely acknowledge us when you arrive in the morning" is more helpful than "I think you are a bad communicator". "I note that you need time and space to yourself but when you get it you can really produce the goods" pinpoints the message in an acceptable way, which should be better received than "You're too much of a loner". Do not allow the appraisal to become an opportunity for subjective gripes. If you do, critically appraised people will tend to get their own back when appraising others, especially if they are identified or identifiable.

5. Let the appraisee choose their appraisers

Allow the employee to select who is to appraise them from an agreed pool, but ensure that those chosen include people with whom they do and don't get on: the aim is to achieve a rounded appraisal. Set limits on the number involved in each appraisal, as otherwise the exercise can become an administrative nightmare. Instruct appraisers to return their questionnaires to the appointed facilitator. If it has been agreed that all comments will be treated anonymously, reassure them that their views will not be attributed specifically to them. Minimise the gap between collecting the data and giving the results.

6. Decide how feedback is to be presented

Work out how the results are to be collated and presented by the facilitator: is your objective to allow employees to be able to compare their own performance over time, compare themselves with like employees, or compare themselves against a set of competences? Consider whether feedback on particular actions is to be linked to a consensus on how important that action is to the job. If so, the results will have to be weighted accordingly.

7. Provide counselling and assistance

Decide whether improvement actions should be left to individuals or whether they should be offered solutions. If you wish to load the emphasis for improvement on to individuals, don't show the results to their boss without their approval. The facilitator or another trained person such as a psychologist should be available to help employees deal with feedback, particularly to advise on how to deal with diverging views. Consider whether to hold development sessions in which appraisees can offer support to each other.

8. Set action plans for improvement

Follow up appraisal with a programme of suitable training. This may range from attending a course, or sitting with a colleague, to internal or external secondment. Remember that learners will have different needs and preferences.

9. Evaluate the use of 360 degree feedback

Examine the appraisal, taking into account the thoughts of all participants, including any difficulties that arose in completing the appraisal questionnaire or in analysing the data from it. Compare the results of using 360 degree feedback with previous appraisal schemes. Details from the evaluation should be acknowledged when undertaking the next appraisal.

Dos and don'ts of 360 degree feedback

Do

* Make the exercise non-threatening by focusing on strengths as much as weaknesses.

* Respect the confidentiality of respondents' replies--if this has been agreed.

* Prepare and support people for their different roles--as appraiser, appraisee, and facilitator.

Don't

* Allow appraisers to drift into personal attacks.

* Treat it as a one-off exercise or leave long gaps between appraisals.

* Forget that employees may find the introduction of 360 degree feedback both threatening and challenging.

Glossary of terms related to 360 degree feedback

Peer appraisal: employees are evaluated by their colleagues and their supervisor.

Team appraisal: team members assess their own team's performance. Feedback should preferably also come from representatives of clients of the team and from a supervisor.

Upward feedback: managers are appraised by those who work under them.

540 degree appraisal: two further perspectives are used in addition to those in 360 degree appraisal: customers and suppliers. Where the majority of a manager's time is spent with either of these two groups, inclusion of their observations makes feedback more useful and believable to the individual.
Thanks you all for sharing great knowledge on 360 Appraisal.
I am little late for this discussion, but I am a new implementer of this process. I am done with framework. I got stuck with evaluation procedure.
Giving scenario: A emp. is being appraised by -- Dir(10% Weight age), TL(20%) Direct Report 1(25%) Direct Report2(25%) Colleague 1(10%) Colleague 2(10%)
Now, feedback taken from all individual Total no. of question is 25(20,40,60,80,100 rating).. now how to produce the final result out of 100 considering above mentioned weight age criteria
What I can think: we dont keep the rating criteria which are (20,40,60,80,100 rating), keep open for everyone's feedback in the range of 1-100 or please suggest any other way
As per our appraisal score criteria
Grade S A+ A B+ B C D
Score >100 95~99 90~94 85~89 80~84 70~79 69<
I have map according to above criteria
Could anyone please give me some idea.

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