The first interview launches you to promote yourself to the prospective employer. This is followed up by the second and the third job interview. Here the due deligence for the right-fitment is done at a higher role. How do you ensure you bring in your breakthroughs to land the offer? Here's few suggestion:

Understanding the typical schedule and purpose of each round can help you prepare for each and hand you an advantage in the hiring process.
Weeding Out

The first interview is strictly used to weed out candidates who stand out from those who simply looked good on paper (resume). Interviewers will try to ask questions to verify the claims made on a resume and the focus remains on matching the candidate to the basic job requirements <link updated to site home> ( Search On Cite | Search On Google )certifications <link updated to site home> ( Search On Cite | Search On Google ) , qualifications, presentation <link updated to site home> ( Search On Cite | Search On Google ) and salary <link updated to site home> .
It’s a “high level chat,” said Mark Johnson, HR manager for the Americas at Serena Software in Redwood City, Calif. “This is where we are getting to know you,” Johnson said. “This is the phase where we say, ‘This is what we’re looking for,’ and ‘This is what we see on your resume that supports what we are looking for.’”
It’s a screening process, said Gia Colosi, director of human resources, at eMeter in San Mateo, Calif., another software maker. “At this point we’re looking at whether you have the technical capability to do the work.”
Layers of a Cake

The second interview <link updated to site home> is where an interviewer will begin to press for examples of specific experiences that support the candidate’s claims to be the person presented in their resume.
“Think of it as layers of a cake,” said Marilyn Monarch, group director for HR consulting and services at Citrix Systems. “We’re trying to find out the applicant’s work history for the last five to seven years … If we’re talking a second interview we’ve got a solid candidate. They’ve moved beyond being a suspect to a prospect.”
Monarch said the type of question she likes to ask in a second interview is to have the candidate speak about a recent incident where they identified an area that needed improvement in their last or current position, and then to walk her through how they went about getting it resolved.
“Sometimes you get an impactful representation of what the candidate is about,” she said. “We’re listening for experience and how they present their story.”
The second interview is also a time to ensure that the candidate understands the intricacies of the position, the work involved and the compensation, Johnson noted. “I have to calibrate my expectations and their experience with what the job requires,” Monarch said.

To continue reading: What to Expect on a Second and Third Interview <link updated to site home>
The second interview is where an interviewer will begin to press for examples of specific experiences that support the candidate’s claims to be the person presented in their resume. The second interview is also a time to ensure that the candidate understands the intricacies of the position, the work involved and the compensation.
Another key point for candidates returning for a second interview is that they know the company they are applying to.
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When they ask a candidate in for a third interview, it is to finalize their view of the person’s technical competence.
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