Cite.Co is a repository of information and resources created by industry seniors and experts sharing their real world insights. Join Network
Change management is the process of developing a planned approach to change in an organization. Typically the objective is to maximize the collective benefits for all people involved in the change and minimize the risk of failure of implementing the change.
Change management can be either ‘reactive’, in which case management is responding to changes in the macro-environment (that is, the source of the change is external), or ‘proactive’, in which case management is initiating the change in order to achieve a desired goal (that is, the source of the change is internal).
To be effective, change management should be multi-disciplinary, touching all aspects of the organization. Its most common uses are in information technology management, strategic management, and process management.
Change management can take many forms and include many change environments. The most common usage to the term refers to organizational change management, which is the process of developing a planned approach to change in an organization. Typically the objective is to maximize the collective benefits for all people involved in the change and minimize the risk of failure of implementing the change. The discipline of change management deals primarily with the human aspect of change, and is therefore related to pure and industrial psychology.
Change management can be approached from a number of angles and applied to numerous organizational processes. Its most common uses are in information technology management, strategic management, and process management. To be effective, change management should be multi-disciplinary, touching all aspects of the organization. However, at its core, implementing new procedures, technologies, and overcoming resistance to change are fundamentally human resource management issues.
Attitudes towards change result from a complex interplay of emotions and cognitive processes. Because of this complexity everyone reacts to change differently. On the positive side, change is seen as akin to opportunity, rejuvenation, progress, innovation, and growth. But just as legitimately, change can also be seen as akin to instability, upheaval, unpredictability, threat, and disorientation.
Whether employees perceive change with fear, anxiety and demoralization, or with excitement and confidence or somewhere in between, depends partially on the individual’s psychological makeup, partially on management’s actions, and partially on the specific nature of the change.
An individual’s attitude toward a change tends to evolve as they become more familiar with it. The stages a person goes through can consist of: apprehension, denial, anger, resentment, depression, cognitive dissonance, compliance, acceptance, and internalization. It is management’s job to create an environment in which people can go through these stages as quickly as possible and even skip some of them. Effective change management programs are frequently sequential, with early measures directed at overcoming the initial apprehension, denial, anger, and resentment, but gradually evolving into a program that supports compliance, acceptance, and internalization.
Management’s first responsibility is to detect trends in the macro-environment so as to be able to identify changes and initiate programs. It is also important to estimate what impact a change will likely have on employee behavior patterns, work processes, technological requirements, and motivation. Management must assess what employee reactions will be and craft a change program that will provide support as workers go through the process of accepting change. The program must then be implemented, disseminated throughout the organization, monitored for effectiveness, and adjusted where necessary.

From United States, Lexington
Its rightly said that each and every employee of an organization has his/her own perception and reaction towards any change happening, therefore, it is accepted both ways by the organization's employees.
From India, Delhi
Thanks Kshitijap,
As my wont, whenever I find a post that seems to be a copy and paste job, I search the web for its source. I found the above piece and more at Change Management 94 see <link no longer exists - removed> which contains information on other areas.

From United Kingdom
This discussion thread is closed. If you want to continue this discussion or have a follow up question, please post it on the network.
Add the url of this thread if you want to cite this discussion.






About Us Advertise Contact Us
Privacy Policy Disclaimer Terms Of Service



All rights reserved @ 2020 Cite.Co™