Urgent , Need To Learn About 's Plz Send Me Material..... - CiteHR
Kaiserpawan@rediffmail.co
Personality Development And Training
K.Ravi
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Sparky
Black Belt
Soni_sona20
Motivating, Learner

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Hi ... I have to give presentation on 5’s, plz send me material or give me some idea about 5’s.... Thanks Soni :confused:
Sure that will cost you only $500 if you are interested mail me or if you want it free search it in citehr.com :-D:-D
Errr.... Have you tried searching the downloads section? - More than enough material there to keep you happy ;)
hi ,this is kaiserpawan,
there are 7 s structure by mackinsey in business policy,in hrm
staff
style
structure
skills
superordinate goal
system
strategy
you can chose any five
i think you satisfy with this if u require help please mail me
have a nice day

hi,this is a detailed about 7 s, it help you lot


What is the 7-S Framework? Description

The 7-S Framework of McKinsey is a management model that describes 7 factors to organize a company in an holistic and effective way. Together these factors determine the way in which a corporation operates. Managers should take into account all seven of these factors, to be sure of successful implementation of a strategy. Large or small. They're all interdependent, so if you fail to pay proper attention to one of them, this may effect all others as well. On top of that, the relative importance of each factor may vary over time.

Origin of the 7-S Framework. History

The 7-S Framework was first mentioned in "The Art Of Japanese Management" by Richard Pascale and Anthony Athos in 1981. They had been investigating how Japanese industry had been so successful. At around the same time that Tom Peters and Robert Waterman were exploring what made a company excellent. The Seven S model was born at a meeting of these four authors in 1978. It appeared also in "In Search of Excellence" by Peters and Waterman, and was taken up as a basic tool by the global management consultancy company McKinsey. Since then it is known as their 7-S model.

The meaning of the 7 Ss



Shared Values (also called Superordinate Goals).

The interconnecting center of McKinsey's model is: Shared Values. What does the organization stands for and what it believes in. Central beliefs and attitudes. Compare: Strategic Intent

Strategy


Plans for the allocation of a firms scarce resources, over time, to reach identified goals. Environment, competition, customers.

Structure

The way in which the organization's units relate to each other: centralized, functional divisions (top-down); decentralized; a matrix, a network, a holding, etc.

Systems

The procedures, processes and routines that characterize how the work should be done: financial systems; recruiting, promotion and performance appraisal systems; information systems.

Staff

Numbers and types of personnel within the organization.

Style

Cultural styleof the organization and how key managers behave in achieving the organization's goals. Compare: Management Styles.

Skills

Distinctive capabilities of personnel or of the organization as a whole. Compare: Core Competences.

Strengths of the 7-S Model. Benefits

· Diagnostic tool for understanding organizations that are ineffective.
· Guides organizational change.
· Combines rational and hard elements with emotional and soft elements.
· Managers must act on all Ss in parallel and all Ss are interrelated


The McKinsey 7S model was named after a consulting company, McKinsey and Company, which has conducted applied research in business and industry (Pascale & Athos, 1981; Peters & Waterman, 1982). All of the authors worked as consultants at McKinsey and Company; in the 1980s, they used the model to analyse over 70 large organisations. The McKinsey 7S Framework was created as a recognisable and easily remembered model in business. The seven variables, which the authors term "levers", all begin with the letter "S":
These seven variables include structure, strategy, systems, skills, style, staff and shared values. Structure is defined as the skeleton of the organisation or the organisational chart. The authors describe strategy as the plan or course of action in allocating resources to achieve identified goals over time. The systems are the routine processes and procedures followed within the organisation. Staff are described in terms of personnel categories within the organisation (e.g. engineers), whereas the skills variable refers to the capabilities of the staff within the organisation as a whole. The way in which key managers behave in achieving organisational goals is considered to be the style variable; this variable is thought to encompass the cultural style of the organisation. The shared values variable, originally termed superordinate goals, refers to the significant meanings or guiding concepts that organisational members share (Peters and Waterman, 1982).
The shape of the model (as shown in figure 1) was also designed to illustrate the interdependency of the variables. This is illustrated by the model also being termed as the "Managerial Molecule". While the authors thought that other variables existed within complex organisations, the variables represented in the model were considered to be of crucial importance to managers and practitioners (Peters and Waterman, 1982).
The analysis of several organisations using the model revealed that American companies tend to focus on those variables which they feel they can change (e.g. structure, strategy and systems) while neglecting the other variables. These other variables (e.g. skills, style, staff and shared values) are considered to be "soft" variables. Japanese and a few excellent American companies are reportedly successful at linking their structure, strategy and systems with the soft variables. The authors have concluded that a company cannot merely change one or two variables to change the whole organisation.
For long-term benefit, they feel that the variables should be changed to become more congruent as a system. The external environment is not mentioned in the McKinsey 7S Framework, although the authors do acknowledge that other variables exist and that they depict only the most crucial variables in the model. While alluded to in their discussion of the model, the notion of performance or effectiveness is not made explicit in the model.
Description of 7 Ss
Strategy: Strategy is the plan of action an organisation prepares in response to, or anticipation of, changes in its external environment. Strategy is differentiated by tactics or operational actions by its nature of being premeditated, well thought through and often practically rehearsed. It deals with essentially three questions (as shown in figure 2): 1) where the organisation is at this moment in time, 2) where the organisation wants to be in a particular length of time and 3) how to get there. Thus, strategy is designed to transform the firm from the present position to the new position described by objectives, subject to constraints of the capabilities or the potential (Ansoff, 1965).
Structure: Business needs to be organised in a specific form of shape that is generally referred to as organisational structure. Organisations are structured in a variety of ways, dependent on their objectives and culture. The structure of the company often dictates the way it operates and performs (Waterman et al., 1980). Traditionally, the businesses have been structured in a hierarchical way with several divisions and departments, each responsible for a specific task such as human resources management, production or marketing. Many layers of management controlled the operations, with each answerable to the upper layer of management. Although this is still the most widely used organisational structure, the recent trend is increasingly towards a flat structure where the work is done in teams of specialists rather than fixed departments. The idea is to make the organisation more flexible and devolve the power by empowering the employees and eliminate the middle management layers (Boyle, 2007).

Systems: Every organisation has some systems or internal processes to support and implement the strategy and run day-to-day affairs. For example, a company may follow a particular process for recruitment. These processes are normally strictly followed and are designed to achieve maximum effectiveness. Traditionally the organisations have been following a bureaucratic-style process model where most decisions are taken at the higher management level and there are various and sometimes unnecessary requirements for a specific decision (e.g. procurement of daily use goods) to be taken. Increasingly, the organisations are simplifying and modernising their process by innovation and use of new technology to make the decision-making process quicker. Special emphasis is on the customers with the intention to make the processes that involve customers as user friendly as possible (Lynch, 2005).
Style/Culture: All organisations have their own distinct culture and management style. It includes the dominant values, beliefs and norms which develop over time and become relatively enduring features of the organisational life. It also entails the way managers interact with the employees and the way they spend their time. The businesses have traditionally been influenced by the military style of management and culture where strict adherence to the upper management and procedures was expected from the lower-rank employees. However, there have been extensive efforts in the past couple of decades to change to culture to a more open, innovative and friendly environment with fewer hierarchies and smaller chain of command. Culture remains an important consideration in the implementation of any strategy in the organisation (Martins and Terblanche, 2003).
Staff: Organisations are made up of humans and it's the people who make the real difference to the success of the organisation in the increasingly knowledge-based society. The importance of human resources has thus got the central position in the strategy of the organisation, away from the traditional model of capital and land. All leading organisations such as IBM, Microsoft, Cisco, etc put extraordinary emphasis on hiring the best staff, providing them with rigorous training and mentoring support, and pushing their staff to limits in achieving professional excellence, and this forms the basis of these organisations' strategy and competitive advantage over their competitors. It is also important for the organisation to instil confidence among the employees about their future in the organisation and future career growth as an incentive for hard work (Purcell and Boxal, 2003).
Shared Values/Superordinate Goals: All members of the organisation share some common fundamental ideas or guiding concepts around which the business is built. This may be to make money or to achieve excellence in a particular field. These values and common goals keep the employees working towards a common destination as a coherent team and are important to keep the team spirit alive. The organisations with weak values and common goals often find their employees following their own personal goals that may be different or even in conflict with those of the organisation or their fellow colleagues (Martins and Terblanche, 2003).

sweet dream :icon1:

Quick Guide to 5S

5S (sometimes referred to as 5C) are five terms beginning with "S" utilised to create an organised workplace suited for visual control and lean production. The technique should help to ensure the workplace is: clean & tidy, well organised, has the right equipment and tools in the right place at the right time and is maintained in this way.
The five S's are:
STEP 1 – Sort - Clear out your area of all unwanted equipment and mess.
STEP 2 - Store what’s left (ask “what’s the best way to store what’s left)
STEP 3 – Shine - Clean the area and equipment thoroughly.

STEP 4 – Standardise - Specific instructions, to ensure steps 1,2 & 3 are
maintained (i.e. the standard way').


STEP 5 – Sustain - Audit regularly to make sure we are all doing what we said we
would do.

Tips:
  • Take loads of photographs before as well as after carrying out 5S in an area.
    photographs will help to reinforce the message of 'the organised workplace'.
  • Don't call 5S 'housekeeping' - 5S is not just about keeping the workplace lean and tidy. Organised workplace should be the key message.
  • Display 'standard' photographs next to the area and conduct audits regularly (each month) - sustaining an organised workplace is the most difficult part.
  • Don't make the audit form too complicated - keep it simple (say 10 points)
  • Make the 5S audits part of your work routine

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