The Role of HR in Talent Management in an organisation
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The Role of HR in Talent Management in an organisation

shaligrami@yahoo.com Started The Discussion:

Hello seniors,
I m Dhara.I am a student doing Masters in Human Resource Management. I wanted some help in preparing a questionnaire on my dissertation topic whch is "The role of HR in Talent Management in an organisation. I have to conduct my study based on an opinion survey. Could someone pls help me?
I would be very obliged if someone could help me prepare a questionnaire and also send me a few names of the organisations in India who apply Talent management strategies. Please send in your reply as soon as possible on .

with regards,
Dhara.

leolingham2000 - Member Since: Apr 2005
HERE ARE FEW QUESTIONS, STARTING WITH
GENERAL AND LEADING TO SPECIFIC QUESTIONS.

THE ONLY COMPANIES, I AM AWARE OF ARE
-HLL [ HINDUSTAN LEVER]
-ITC
-TATAS
-INFOSYS [ STARTED RECENTLY]
-WIPRO [ STARTED RECENTLY]
==============================
*How is your business doing currently?
*How did it fare in the last 3 years?
*What is your estimated prediction for the next 3 years?
*What strategic issues can hinder this predicted growth?
*Is talent availability one of those issues?
*Is there a plan to overcome this?
*What is the current bench strength?
*How many would be requied in the next 3 year?
=======================================
*Will this issue be treated as a priority, by the management?
OR
*Will this issue be part of regular workforce planning ?
*Will this issue be a part of succession planning?
*Will this issue be a part of GAP CLOSING STRATEGY?
*Will this issue be combined with regular selection/development?
*Will this issue be treated as a multi year process ?
============================================
DO YOU FOLLOW THE SYSTEMATIC APPROACH
-identifying the requirements
-identifying the high potential candidates
-put them through intentional learning experiences
-select the best
-evaluate the success.
--------------------------------------------------------
HOW DO YOU INDENTIFY THE TALENT
-BY COMPETENCIES
*creating profile of leadership jobs
*creating profile of management
OR
-BY RESULTS
*objective measures like sales/production/etc
*subjective measures like total contribution /team effort etc
*accountable for complex jobs
OR
-BY POTENTIAL
*accumalted skills / experience
*ability to learn new skills
*willing to tackle bigger/complex challenges
============================================
WHAT ARE YOUR TALENT DEVELOPMENT/RETENTION
INITIATIVES
1.ACQUIRE NEW TALENTS
*attracting -create an emloyer brand
*soucing - using varieties of strategies
*selecting- using effective selection process
------------------------------
2.LEVERAGING EXISTING TALENTS
*maximizing the value of the current high potential
*using the performance management systems
*realigning the capabilities and responding to the
changing conditions.
------------------------------------
3.RETAINING THE CURRENT POTENTIAL
*employment value proposition--offer the potentials
what they want.
*offer the potentials a systematic and targeted development
opportunities.
=============================================
WITHIN your organization, what kind of talent development
activities are carried out
-skill building classrom workshops
-coaching
-mentoring
-education
-developmental experience
-short term assignments
-action learning
others
===========================================
WHAT MATTERS MOST FOR talent development
-job experience matters most
-accelerated development of high performers
-provide people candid feedback on strength / weaknesses
-making coaching a part of each development discussion
-forge mentoring relationship to build motivation and
loyalty.
-focused training program or career transition, technical
skills and leadership development.
================================================
IN YOUR OPINION, WHICH OF THESE SUCCESSFUL
FACTORS HELP TO DEVELOP AND RETAIN
TALENTS
-visible support from top management
-responsibility for talents owned by line management
-simple and tailored programs unique to the organization
-flexible and linked to company business plan
-evolved from a thorough HR review process
-based on objective assessment of candidates
-incorporate candidate's inputs
-part of broad management development efforts
-emphasize on accountability and follow up.
==============================================
1.Talent management is the process of ensuring that the organization attracts, retains,
motivates and develops the talented people it needs.

-do you have such a process in your company?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
2. developing the organization as an 'employer of choice' ‑ a 'great place to work';
-do you have a program to make the organization an ''employer of choic''?
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
3. using selection and recruitment procedures that ensure that good quality
people are recruited who are likely to thrive in the organization and stay with
it for a reasonable length of time;
-does your company undertake such a campaign?
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
4. designing jobs and developing roles which give people opportunities to apply
and grow their skills and provide them with autonomy, interest and challenge;
-does your HR undertake such assignments ?
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
5. providing talented staff with opportunities for career development ‑and growth;
-is there such a program in your organization?
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
6. creating a working environment in which work processes and facilities enable
rewarding (in the broadest sense) jobs and roles to be designed and developed;
-does your organization facilitate these developments?
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

7. developing the leadership qualities of line managers;
recognizing those with talent by rewarding excellence, enterprise and achieve­
ment;
-do you have these as part of your leadership development programs
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

8. succession planning ‑ ensuring that the organization has suitable people to fill
vacancies arising from promotion, retirement or death;
-do you have a succession planning program in your organization?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
9. conducting talent audits which identify those with potential and those who might
leave the organizations.
-does your company organize talent auditing periodically ?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

10.good opportunities for development, training and career progression;
-does the organization offer facilities for progression?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
11.a reasonable degree of security;
-does your organization offer security for talents retention
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
12. enhanced future employability because of the reputation of the organization
as one that employs and develops high quality people,
as well as the learning opportunities it provides;
-is there scope for development / opportunities for talents
================================================== =======
13.better facilities and scope for creative employees.
-does your organization encourage creative talents
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
14. employment conditions that satisfy work‑life balance needs;
-is the employment conditions encourage creativity?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
15. a reward system that recognizes and values contribution,
and provides competitive pay and benefits.
- can the current reward system sustain talents
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
================================================== =====
16.DO YOU
Intensify YOUR efforts to hire hard-to-find and increasingly expensive people from
outside
OR
17.Do little or nothing
and probably experience competitive decline

18.DO YOU
Tap into the quality people already in the organisation thus growing and keeping their
own talent.
================================================== =============
Fundamentally, there are three main arguments in support of effective Talent
Management:
19.Argument #1: Recurring costs are reduced
Put simply, it is more cost effective to identify, develop and retain management talent
than to replace lost talent with recruitment from the external labour market. Various
studies estimate (conservatively) the cost of replacing an executive can run into several
times the salary of that executive.
--DO YOU AGREE WITH THIS ARGUEMENT ?

20.Argument #2: Economic outputs improve
Over the last several years, there has been a growing body of research and evidence
that clearly shows the incremental economic value that talented, high performing people
deliver.
--DO YOU AGREE WITH THIS ARGUEMENT ?

21.Argument #3: Enterprise value is maximised
Research shows a major difference in average share performance between
organisations with a culture of talent management, and those without.
-DO YOU AGREE WITH THIS ARGUEMENT ?
================================================== ===
22.Only start if you have CEO
sponsorship

*CEO stewardship for talent management is critical for
generating the profile, commitment and focus on the
management of talent.
-DO YOU AGREE WITH THIS STATEMENT?
--------------------------------------------------------------------
23.Gain line management
support

*Line managers are expected to coach and support their talented
direct reports towards development and career goals, a process
that should cascade from the CEO and senior executives.
--DO YOU AGREE WITH THIS STATEMENT?
-------------------------------------------------------------------
24.HR must act as facilitators

*HR’s role is to facilitate the management of talent and to act as
coaches and consultants to the line managers. For it to be truly
successful, talent management cannot be seen as simply an HR
initiative.
2--DO YOU AGREE WITH THIS STATEMENT?
--=================

hope this is useful to you

regards

LEO LINGHAM

thquaye - Member Since: Mar 2006
HI, Dhara,

I think the questions provided is good for your work. Am also doing a dissertation on Talent management so am really inrested in your work. Will please share with me how you are going about your work more especially literature gathered on the topic and the methodology you are adopting for the work.

you can send you response to my mail address

Thanks

sajita nair - Member Since: Jan 2006
hi LEO

I am a regular reader of all your posts and most of them are very helpful and insightful. I am a PG(HR Student) doing a project on potential appraisal for talent management at ISPAT. my first is to identify high potential employees and identify the competencies they have and what are the competencies they should possess for a future role.

could you please give me some guidelines regarding how to proceed with the project.

at first i have taken samples of employees who are high performers and i am trying to understand the role so that i can gauge the competencies the role would possess. what i am worried about is how to identify the competencies that the person has and identify gaps

would be really nice if you could help me

Regards
Sajita Nair

leolingham2000 - Member Since: Apr 2005
GAUGING EMPLOYEE POTENTIAL FOR MANAGEMENT POSITION.

The aim of potential assessment is to identify training and development
needs, provide guidance on possible directions in which an individual's
career might go, and indicate who has potential for promotion.

A more comprehensive approach is provided by the use of assessment centres. These incorporate a range of assessment techniques and typically have the following features:

• The focus of the centre is on behaviour.

• Exercises are used to capture and simulate the key dimensions of the job. These include one‑to‑one role‑plays and group exercises. It is assumed that performance in these simulations predicts behaviour on the job.

• Interviews and tests will be used in addition to group exercises.

• Performance is measured in several dimensions in terms of the competencies required to achieve the target level of performance in a particular job or at a particular level in the organization.

• Several candidates or participants are assessed together to allow interaction and to make the experience more open and participative.

• Several assessors or observers are used in order to increase the objectivity of assessments. Involving senior managers is desirable to ensure that they 'own' the process. Assessors must be carefully trained.

Assessment centres provide good opportunities for indicating the extent to which candidates match the culture of the organization. This will be established by observation of their behaviour in different but typical situations, and by the range of the tests and structured interviews that are part of the proceedings. Assessment centres also give candidates a better feel for the organization and its values so that they can decide for themselves whether or not they are likely to fit.

THESE CAN CONDUCTED IN-HOUSE OR OUTSOURCED.
================================================== ========= The Approach
Starting from Scratch

1.REVIEW THE CORPORATE VALUES.

2.REVIEW THE CORPORATE MISSION STATEMENT.

3.REVIEW THE CORPORATE OBJECTIVES/ STRATEGY.

4.REVIEW THE JOB PURPOSE.
5.REVIEW THE JOB DESCRIPTIONS.
6.REVIEW THE JOB SPECIFICATIONS


7. Identify performance criteria / skills for individuals and work units.


2.Identify individuals under the current situation
HIGH FLIERS / GOOD PERFORMERS/ NOT SO GOOD.

3. Interview job incumbents and informed observers.

4. Observe job incumbents directly—just 'a day in the life."

5.Develop interim competency model‑analyze data for themes and patterns and
look for differences between exceptional and standard performers.

TEST THE COMPETENCES.

6. Administer a survey and/or conduct focus groups to include a
wider population and test the de­gree of relevance and importance
of the competencies to the job.

7. Analyze survey or focus group data and refine the model
.
VALIDATE

8. Validate the model: to identify competencies that corre­late with
exceptional performers.

9. Finalize the model SKILLS/ COMPETENCES.

10.Set the level of competences.

CONDUCT THE FINAL PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL.
================================================== ==
THESE ARE INPUT SUPPORT REQUIRED TO CONDUCT THE
ABOVE LISTED EXERCISE. COULD BE USED FOR STRUCTURING
ORAL /AND OR WRITTEN COMMUNICATIONS.

Defining What You Want

EXPERTS have explored a wide variety of methods to describe leadership attributes. It has been found that it takes four types of information to develop a solid understanding of executive candidates' strengths and weaknesses:

1. job challenges /Preparatory experiences [ what one has done.]

2.Organizational knowledge (what one knows).

3.Behaviorally defined competencies (what one is capable of]

4.Executive derailers and other personal attributes (who one is).


1. Job Challenges

Job challenges are descriptions of the kinds of situations that an individual entering top management should have experienced or at least had some exposure to. Examples include:

• Carry an assignment from beginning to end.

• Solve a difficult problem.

• Assume a significant leadership role.

• Build and lead a team.

• Follow through with a plan, product, process, or market start‑up.

• Manage or become heavily involved with a merger, acquisition, strategic alliance, or partnership opportunity.

• Implement a companywide change.

• Complete an assignment with tight time and resource constraints (e.g., be first to market).

• Manage in an e‑commerce environment.

• Assume responsibility for growing, downsizing, reorganizing, or shutting down a unit or operation.

• Handle an emergency situation,

• Build an entrepreneurial mind‑set in a unit.

• Develop and implement a plan to cut costs or control inventories.

• Learn and apply skills quickly.

• Manage a union or nonunion operation.

• Be responsible for an operation in another country or in multiple countries.

• Take on an expatriate assignment.

• Deal with conflict, change, or hurt feelings.

• Build a new management team.

• Identify/Select talent.

• Without position power, lead a team or group through personal influence (e.g., project team, task force).

* Manage a turnaround/"fix‑it" situation.
• Oversee a corporatewide process (e.g., new product development, hiring).

• Negotiate agreements with external organizations.

• Face a situation outside the individual's area of technical expertise, relying heavily on leadership skills.

• Deal with people from different disciplines, cultures, or countries who have diverse perspectives.

• Manage a geographically dispersed team.

• Operate in high‑pressure or high‑visibility situations.

• Manage in a fast‑paced, hard‑nosed business environment.

• Work with people outside the organization, such as government bureau representatives or special interest groups.

• Make presentations to senior managers or a board of directors.

• Develop others.

• Manage a quality improvement team or project.

• Manage a large‑scale infrastructure project (e.g., build an office building).

• Lead a formal meeting where attendees compose different functions within the organization.

• Assume bottom‑line responsibility for an operation.

• Interact directly with an external customer.

• Leverage technology into products or services.

• Create multi‑organization relationships.

• Create a corporate culture.

• Develop or maintain alliances with external partners.

• Implement systems, processes, and strategic plans.

• Work in a line/staff position.

• Work in or with fast‑, slow‑, or hyper‑growing organizations.

• Create a new product.

• Manage a group of consultants.

• Manage a large project.

• Manage a product.

• Manage a long‑ or short‑cycle business.

• Create a breakthrough product or service (as opposed to incremental improvement).

• Control costs against a fixed budget.

• Manage "Generation Xers."

• Show entrepreneurial skills.

• Manage in a flat organization (e.g., many direct reports).

• Manage in a matrix organization.

• Manage a virtual team (e.g., direct reports in different locations).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Organizational Knowledge Areas

Organizational knowledge refers to the understanding that managers have about how the various parts of the organization operate. There are four components of organizational knowledge: functions; processes; systems; and products, services, and technologies. Using this breakdown helps ensure that no important knowledge areas are left out. (There is some overlap in the areas.)

Functions

To perform effectively, an executive must have at least a working knowledge of the company's functions as well as how they interrelate. Examples of organizational functions include:

‑ Major Division or Group Office

‑ Field Operations or Field Office

‑ International Operations

‑ Research & Development

-Product Management or
Brand Marketing

-SALES

Processes

There are various types of processes to consider:

‑ Distribution

‑ Finance& Accounting

‑ Human Resources

Information Technology
(e.g., MIS)

‑ Engineering

Core Business Process‑Activities that physically create a product or service that is of value to external customers. A key source of competitive advantage, core business processes interact with internal or external customers at the beginning and end of the process. For instance, the auto industry's core process might be new car design, manufacturing, distribution, sales, and service.

Enabling Business Process‑Produces outputs that act as the inputs to core processes. In other words, the enabling process gives the core process the materials needed to operate. Examples of the enabling business process include selection/recruitment (employee acquisition is the input to the core processes), financial reporting (provides "feedback" input to the
core processes), sales training (sales representatives must obtain training to
do their jobs well ' ), and marketing (magazine and newspaper
advertisements, television commercials, corporate sponsorships of events).

Support Process‑A pool of resources that is assigned to and shared by core and enabling processes. Examples of support processes include information technology management, financial management, employee orientation, and staff development.

Leaders need a thorough understanding of company processes to improve the efficiency, accuracy, productivity, and quality of products and services. Many leaders lack the process orientation or knowledge to be able to differentiate between process or system problems and people issues, Understanding these processes will help in that assessment.

Systems

The third component of organizational knowledge is systems knowledge‑the degree to which a manager understands how the organization's internal systems‑work. Organizational systems include:

• Long‑range planning. ‑ Succession management.
• Budgeting. ‑ Compensation.
• Staffing/Selection/Promotion. ‑ Training.
• Performance management
(performance appraisal).

Because many systems support business processes, there can be overlaps in
the lists (e.g., staffing/ selection/promotion is both a process and a system).

Products, Services, and Technologies

The fourth component of organizational knowledge is familiarity with core products, services, and technologies. Because senior managers often must deal with issues that cut across the total organization, they need a working knowledge of these areas of the company.


Executive Competencies

I

Competencies (also known as dimensions) define clusters of behavior, knowledge, technical skills, and motivations that are important to job success. Here are some executive‑level competencies , along with their definitions:

• Accurate Self‑Insight‑Demonstrating an awareness of own strengths and development needs as well as the impact of own behavior on others,

• Adaptability‑Effectively managing changing environments, including business challenges, technologies, etc.

• Building Organizational Talent‑Attracting, developing, and retaining talented individuals; creating a learning environment that ensures associates realize their highest potential; allowing the organization as a whole to meet future challenges.

• Business Acumen‑Understanding and utilizing economic, financial, and industry data to accurately diagnose business strengths and weaknesses; identifying key issues and developing strategies and plans.

• Change Leadership‑Continuously seeking (or encouraging others to seek) opportunities for different and innovative approaches to addressing organizational problems and opportunities.

• Coaching/Teaching‑Providing timely coaching, guidance, and feedback to help others excel on the job and meet key accountabih ties.


Communicating with Impact‑Expressing thoughts, feelings, and ideas in a clear, succinct, and compelling manner in both individual and group situations; adjusting language to capture the attention of the audience.

Cultural Interpersonal Effectiveness‑Demonstrating an understanding and effective adaptation to varying interpersonal styles and norms across cultures; taking actions to minimize the stresses of cross‑cultural experiences and using them as opportunities for growth.

Customer Orientation‑Cultivating strategic customer relationships and ensuring that the customer perspective is the driving force behind all value‑added business activities.

Developing Strategic Relationships‑Using appropriate interpersonal styles and communication methods to influence and build effective relationships with business partners (e.g., peers, functional partners, external vendors, and alliance partners).

Driving for Results‑Setting high goals for personal and group accomplishment; using measurement methods to monitor progress toward goal attainment; tenaciously working to meet or exceed those goals while deriving satisfaction from the process of goal achievement and continuous improvement.

Empowerment/ Delegation‑Using appropriate delegation to create a sense of ownership of higher‑level organizational issues and encouraging individuals to stretch beyond their current capabilities.

Energy‑Demonstrating the physical and mental stamina necessary to meet the challenges of organizational demands.

Entrepreneurship‑Advancing own understanding and sharing insight regarding key market drivers; actively using that knowledge to create/seize business and customer focus opportunities and/or expand into new markets, products, or services.

Establishing Strategic Direction‑Establishing and committing to a long‑range course of action to accomplish a long‑range goal or vision after analyzing factual information and assumptions; taking into consideration resources, constraints, and organizational values.

Executive Disposition‑Conveying an image that is consistent with the organization's values; demonstrating the qualities, traits, and demeanor (excluding intelligence, competence, or special talents) that command leadership respect.
Global Acumen‑Developing and incorporating an understanding of the competitive global business environment as well as an awareness of economic, social, and political trends that impact the organizatior~s global strategy.

Influencing Others‑Using appropriate interpersonal styles and techniques to gain acceptance of ideas or plans; modifying one's own behavior to accommodate tasks, situations, and individuals involved.

Learning Orientation‑Demonstrating and encouraging in others a zeal for new knowledge, experiences, and challenges; regularly creating and capitalizing on learning opportunities.

Managing the job‑Effectively controlling one's job by planning time on priority goals, requirements, and areas of opportunities.

Mobilizing Resources‑Managing staff and resources consistent with organizational goals; proactively negotiating and accessing resources outside of one's immediate domain when necessary.

Operational Decision Making‑Relating and comparing; securing relevant information and identifying key issues; committing to an action after developing alternative courses of action that take into consideration resources, constraints, and organizational values.

Persuasiveness‑Persuading or influencing others to accept a point of view, adopt a specific agenda, or take a course of action.

Positive Disposition‑Demonstrating a positive attitude in the face of difficult or challenging situations; providing an uplifting (albeit realistic) outlook on what the future holds and the opportunities it may present.

Reading the Environment‑Demonstrating broad organizational awareness by accurately perceiving organizational, political, and social dynamics and trends.

Selling the Vision‑Passionately selling an organizational strategy; creating a clear view of the future state by helping others understand and feel how things will be different when the future vision is achieved.

Team Development‑Using appropriate methods and interpersonal style to develop, motivate, and guide a team toward successful outcomes and attainment of business objectives.

Valuing Diversity‑Creates and maintains an environment that naturally enables all participants to contribute to their full potential in pursuit of organizational objectives.

Executive Derailers

Executive derailers are personal attributes that can cause executives to fad even when they have all the other necessary descriptors..

Approval Dependent

This derailer applies to executives who seek and need praise or reassurance from others, particularly from people higher in the organization.

Argumentative (Defensive)

Executives with this derailer are skeptical, tense, and, perhaps, paranoid or suspicious. They are focused on protecting their own interests and are likely to resist coaching and feedback.

Arrogant

This derailer applies to executives who are overly self‑assured and confident. As a result, they tend to be poor listeners, often dismissing ideas or feedback from others.

Attention Seeking (Self‑Promoting)

Executives with this derailer tend to be gregarious, charming, and persuasive­perhaps excessively so. This can lead them to become melodramatic and self­promoting.

Avoidant

While seeming pleasant and cooperative, these executives tend to be preoccupied with their own agendas and might prefer to address issues covertly (avoiding more direct solutions). Thus, they can be perceived as procrastinators or manipulative.

Eccentric

Executives with this derailer often are described as creative and, accordingly, different from others, perhaps to the point of being unorthodox or even odd.
Imperceptive

This derailer describes executives who are not naturally inclined to read others' behavior, intent, and motivations. They might not understand others'reaction to their own behavior.

Impulsive

This derailer applies to executives who are impatient, unpredictable, and inclined to act before considering the consequences of their actions.

Perfectionistic (Micromanager)

These executives tend to micromanage. They are controlling and demanding of others.

Risk Averse

Executives with this derailer are described as indecisive, too deliberate, or reluctant to take unusual or unconventional actions. They overemphasize the prospects of failure.

Volatile

These executives have difficulty controlling their emotions. They are often moody and quick to erupt in anger.


COMPETENCIES COMMONLY related to MANAGERIAL
SUCCESS .


A. Interpersonal
Skills

1.Communicating
with Impact

2.Cultural
Interpersonal
Effectiveness

3.Customer
Orientation

4.Developing
Strategic
Relationships

5.Persuasiveness

B. Leadership skills

6. Building organizational
Talents

7.Change Leadership

8.Coaching / Teaching

9.Empowerment / Delegation

10.Influencing Others

11.Selling the vision

12. Team Development


C. Business / Management Skills

13.Business Acumen

14.Entrepreneurship

15. Establishing strategic direction

16.Global acumen

17. Managing the job.

18.Mobilizing Resources

19.Operational Decision Making

D. Personal Attributes

20. Accurate self insight

21.Adaptability

22.Driving for Results

23.Energy

24.Executive Disposition

25.Learning Orientation
26.Positive Disposition.

27.Reading the Environment

28. Valuing Diversity




Scale for evaluation.

5 Excels in all key actions; full mastery of all aspects of this competency.

4 Excels in some but not all key actions; has no significant development needs in any key actions.

3 Performs well in the more important/critical key actions; needs development in at least one or more subtle or complex key actions.

2 Performs well in some key actions but has significant development needs in at least one key action.

1 Performs adequately in basic key actions but has significant development needs in several areas.





GAUGING EMPLOYEE POTENTIAL FOR MANAGEMENT POSITION.

The aim of potential assessment is to identify training and development
needs, provide guidance on possible directions in which an individual's
career might go, and indicate who has potential for promotion.

A more comprehensive approach is provided by the use of assessment centres. These incorporate a range of assessment techniques and typically have the following features:

• The focus of the centre is on behaviour.

• Exercises are used to capture and simulate the key dimensions of the job. These include one‑to‑one role‑plays and group exercises. It is assumed that performance in these simulations predicts behaviour on the job.

• Interviews and tests will be used in addition to group exercises.

• Performance is measured in several dimensions in terms of the competencies required to achieve the target level of performance in a particular job or at a particular level in the organization.

• Several candidates or participants are assessed together to allow interaction and to make the experience more open and participative.

• Several assessors or observers are used in order to increase the objectivity of assessments. Involving senior managers is desirable to ensure that they 'own' the process. Assessors must be carefully trained.

Assessment centres provide good opportunities for indicating the extent to which candidates match the culture of the organization. This will be established by observation of their behaviour in different but typical situations, and by the range of the tests and structured interviews that are part of the proceedings. Assessment centres also give candidates a better feel for the organization and its values so that they can decide for themselves whether or not they are likely to fit.

THESE CAN CONDUCTED IN-HOUSE OR OUTSOURCED.
================================================== ========= The Approach
Starting from Scratch

1.REVIEW THE CORPORATE VALUES.

2.REVIEW THE CORPORATE MISSION STATEMENT.

3.REVIEW THE CORPORATE OBJECTIVES/ STRATEGY.

4.REVIEW THE JOB PURPOSE.
5.REVIEW THE JOB DESCRIPTIONS.
6.REVIEW THE JOB SPECIFICATIONS


7. Identify performance criteria / skills for individuals and work units.
All inputs required for developing criteria are provided in the
following few pages.

2.Identify individuals under the current situation
HIGH FLIERS / GOOD PERFORMERS/ NOT SO GOOD.

3. Interview job incumbents and informed observers.

4. Observe job incumbents directly—just 'a day in the life."

5.Develop interim competency model‑analyze data for themes and patterns and
look for differences between exceptional and standard performers.

TEST THE COMPETENCES.

6. Administer a survey and/or conduct focus groups to include a
wider population and test the de­gree of relevance and importance
of the competencies to the job.

7. Analyze survey or focus group data and refine the model
.
VALIDATE

8. Validate the model: to identify competencies that corre­late with
exceptional performers.

9. Finalize the model SKILLS/ COMPETENCES.

10.Set the level of competences.

CONDUCT THE FINAL PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL.
================================================== ==
THESE ARE INPUT SUPPORT REQUIRED TO CONDUCT THE
ABOVE LISTED EXERCISE. COULD BE USED FOR STRUCTURING
ORAL /AND OR WRITTEN COMMUNICATIONS.

Defining What You Want

EXPERTS have explored a wide variety of methods to describe leadership attributes. It has beeNfound that it takes four types of information to develop a solid understanding of executive candidates' strengths and weaknesses:

1. job challenges /Preparatory experiences [ what one has done.]

2.Organizational knowledge (what one knows).

3.Behaviorally defined competencies (what one is capable of]

4.Executive derailers and other personal attributes (who one is).


1. Job Challenges

Job challenges are descriptions of the kinds of situations that an individual entering top management should have experienced or at least had some exposure to. Examples include:

• Carry an assignment from beginning to end.

• Solve a difficult problem.

• Assume a significant leadership role.

• Build and lead a team.

• Follow through with a plan, product, process, or market start‑up.

• Manage or become heavily involved with a merger, acquisition, strategic alliance, or partnership opportunity.

• Implement a companywide change.

• Complete an assignment with tight time and resource constraints (e.g., be first to market).

• Manage in an e‑commerce environment.

• Assume responsibility for growing, downsizing, reorganizing, or shutting down a unit or operation.

• Handle an emergency situation,

• Build an entrepreneurial mind‑set in a unit.

• Develop and implement a plan to cut costs or control inventories.

• Learn and apply skills quickly.

• Manage a union or nonunion operation.

• Be responsible for an operation in another country or in multiple countries.

• Take on an expatriate assignment.

• Deal with conflict, change, or hurt feelings.

• Build a new management team.

• Identify/Select talent.

• Without position power, lead a team or group through personal influence (e.g., project team, task force).

* Manage a turnaround/"fix‑it" situation.
• Oversee a corporatewide process (e.g., new product development, hiring).

• Negotiate agreements with external organizations.

• Face a situation outside the individual's area of technical expertise, relying heavily on leadership skills.

• Deal with people from different disciplines, cultures, or countries who have diverse perspectives.

• Manage a geographically dispersed team.

• Operate in high‑pressure or high‑visibility situations.

• Manage in a fast‑paced, hard‑nosed business environment.

• Work with people outside the organization, such as government bureau representatives or special interest groups.

• Make presentations to senior managers or a board of directors.

• Develop others.

• Manage a quality improvement team or project.

• Manage a large‑scale infrastructure project (e.g., build an office building).

• Lead a formal meeting where attendees compose different functions within the organization.

• Assume bottom‑line responsibility for an operation.

• Interact directly with an external customer.

• Leverage technology into products or services.

• Create multi‑organization relationships.

• Create a corporate culture.

• Develop or maintain alliances with external partners.

• Implement systems, processes, and strategic plans.

• Work in a line/staff position.

• Work in or with fast‑, slow‑, or hyper‑growing organizations.

• Create a new product.

• Manage a group of consultants.

• Manage a large project.

• Manage a product.

• Manage a long‑ or short‑cycle business.

• Create a breakthrough product or service (as opposed to incremental improvement).

• Control costs against a fixed budget.

• Manage "Generation Xers."

• Show entrepreneurial skills.

• Manage in a flat organization (e.g., many direct reports).

• Manage in a matrix organization.

• Manage a virtual team (e.g., direct reports in different locations).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Organizational Knowledge Areas

Organizational knowledge refers to the understanding that managers have about how the various parts of the organization operate. There are four components of organizational knowledge: functions; processes; systems; and products, services, and technologies. Using this breakdown helps ensure that no important knowledge areas are left out. (There is some overlap in the areas.)

Functions

To perform effectively, an executive must have at least a working knowledge of the company's functions as well as how they interrelate. Examples of organizational functions include:

‑ Major Division or Group Office

‑ Field Operations or Field Office

‑ International Operations

‑ Research & Development

-Product Management or
Brand Marketing

-SALES

Processes

There are various types of processes to consider:

‑ Distribution

‑ Finance& Accounting

‑ Human Resources

Information Technology
(e.g., MIS)

‑ Engineering

Core Business Process‑Activities that physically create a product or service that is of value to external customers. A key source of competitive advantage, core business processes interact with internal or external customers at the beginning and end of the process. For instance, the auto industry's core process might be new car design, manufacturing, distribution, sales, and service.

Enabling Business Process‑Produces outputs that act as the inputs to core processes. In other words, the enabling process gives the core process the materials needed to operate. Examples of the enabling business process include selection/recruitment (employee acquisition is the input to the core processes), financial reporting (provides "feedback" input to the
core processes), sales training (sales representatives must obtain training to
do their jobs well ' ), and marketing (magazine and newspaper
advertisements, television commercials, corporate sponsorships of events).

Support Process‑A pool of resources that is assigned to and shared by core and enabling processes. Examples of support processes include information technology management, financial management, employee orientation, and staff development.

Leaders need a thorough understanding of company processes to improve the efficiency, accuracy, productivity, and quality of products and services. Many leaders lack the process orientation or knowledge to be able to differentiate between process or system problems and people issues, Understanding these processes will help in that assessment.

Systems

The third component of organizational knowledge is systems knowledge‑the degree to which a manager understands how the organization's internal systems‑work. Organizational systems include:

• Long‑range planning. ‑ Succession management.
• Budgeting. ‑ Compensation.
• Staffing/Selection/Promotion. ‑ Training.
• Performance management
(performance appraisal).

Because many systems support business processes, there can be overlaps in
the lists (e.g., staffing/ selection/promotion is both a process and a system).

Products, Services, and Technologies

The fourth component of organizational knowledge is familiarity with core products, services, and technologies. Because senior managers often must deal with issues that cut across the total organization, they need a working knowledge of these areas of the company.


Executive Competencies

I

Competencies (also known as dimensions) define clusters of behavior, knowledge, technical skills, and motivations that are important to job success. Here are some executive‑level competencies , along with their definitions:

• Accurate Self‑Insight‑Demonstrating an awareness of own strengths and development needs as well as the impact of own behavior on others,

• Adaptability‑Effectively managing changing environments, including business challenges, technologies, etc.

• Building Organizational Talent‑Attracting, developing, and retaining talented individuals; creating a learning environment that ensures associates realize their highest potential; allowing the organization as a whole to meet future challenges.

• Business Acumen‑Understanding and utilizing economic, financial, and industry data to accurately diagnose business strengths and weaknesses; identifying key issues and developing strategies and plans.

• Change Leadership‑Continuously seeking (or encouraging others to seek) opportunities for different and innovative approaches to addressing organizational problems and opportunities.

• Coaching/Teaching‑Providing timely coaching, guidance, and feedback to help others excel on the job and meet key accountabih ties.


Communicating with Impact‑Expressing thoughts, feelings, and ideas in a clear, succinct, and compelling manner in both individual and group situations; adjusting language to capture the attention of the audience.

Cultural Interpersonal Effectiveness‑Demonstrating an understanding and effective adaptation to varying interpersonal styles and norms across cultures; taking actions to minimize the stresses of cross‑cultural experiences and using them as opportunities for growth.

Customer Orientation‑Cultivating strategic customer relationships and ensuring that the customer perspective is the driving force behind all value‑added business activities.

Developing Strategic Relationships‑Using appropriate interpersonal styles and communication methods to influence and build effective relationships with business partners (e.g., peers, functional partners, external vendors, and alliance partners).

Driving for Results‑Setting high goals for personal and group accomplishment; using measurement methods to monitor progress toward goal attainment; tenaciously working to meet or exceed those goals while deriving satisfaction from the process of goal achievement and continuous improvement.

Empowerment/ Delegation‑Using appropriate delegation to create a sense of ownership of higher‑level organizational issues and encouraging individuals to stretch beyond their current capabilities.

Energy‑Demonstrating the physical and mental stamina necessary to meet the challenges of organizational demands.

Entrepreneurship‑Advancing own understanding and sharing insight regarding key market drivers; actively using that knowledge to create/seize business and customer focus opportunities and/or expand into new markets, products, or services.

Establishing Strategic Direction‑Establishing and committing to a long‑range course of action to accomplish a long‑range goal or vision after analyzing factual information and assumptions; taking into consideration resources, constraints, and organizational values.

Executive Disposition‑Conveying an image that is consistent with the organization's values; demonstrating the qualities, traits, and demeanor (excluding intelligence, competence, or special talents) that command leadership respect.
Global Acumen‑Developing and incorporating an understanding of the competitive global business environment as well as an awareness of economic, social, and political trends that impact the organizatior~s global strategy.

Influencing Others‑Using appropriate interpersonal styles and techniques to gain acceptance of ideas or plans; modifying one's own behavior to accommodate tasks, situations, and individuals involved.

Learning Orientation‑Demonstrating and encouraging in others a zeal for new knowledge, experiences, and challenges; regularly creating and capitalizing on learning opportunities.

Managing the job‑Effectively controlling one's job by planning time on priority goals, requirements, and areas of opportunities.

Mobilizing Resources‑Managing staff and resources consistent with organizational goals; proactively negotiating and accessing resources outside of one's immediate domain when necessary.

Operational Decision Making‑Relating and comparing; securing relevant information and identifying key issues; committing to an action after developing alternative courses of action that take into consideration resources, constraints, and organizational values.

Persuasiveness‑Persuading or influencing others to accept a point of view, adopt a specific agenda, or take a course of action.

Positive Disposition‑Demonstrating a positive attitude in the face of difficult or challenging situations; providing an uplifting (albeit realistic) outlook on what the future holds and the opportunities it may present.

Reading the Environment‑Demonstrating broad organizational awareness by accurately perceiving organizational, political, and social dynamics and trends.

Selling the Vision‑Passionately selling an organizational strategy; creating a clear view of the future state by helping others understand and feel how things will be different when the future vision is achieved.

Team Development‑Using appropriate methods and interpersonal style to develop, motivate, and guide a team toward successful outcomes and attainment of business objectives.

Valuing Diversity‑Creates and maintains an environment that naturally enables all participants to contribute to their full potential in pursuit of organizational objectives.

Executive Derailers

Executive derailers are personal attributes that can cause executives to fad even when they have all the other necessary descriptors..

Approval Dependent

This derailer applies to executives who seek and need praise or reassurance from others, particularly from people higher in the organization.

Argumentative (Defensive)

Executives with this derailer are skeptical, tense, and, perhaps, paranoid or suspicious. They are focused on protecting their own interests and are likely to resist coaching and feedback.

Arrogant

This derailer applies to executives who are overly self‑assured and confident. As a result, they tend to be poor listeners, often dismissing ideas or feedback from others.

Attention Seeking (Self‑Promoting)

Executives with this derailer tend to be gregarious, charming, and persuasive­perhaps excessively so. This can lead them to become melodramatic and self­promoting.

Avoidant

While seeming pleasant and cooperative, these executives tend to be preoccupied with their own agendas and might prefer to address issues covertly (avoiding more direct solutions). Thus, they can be perceived as procrastinators or manipulative.

Eccentric

Executives with this derailer often are described as creative and, accordingly, different from others, perhaps to the point of being unorthodox or even odd.
Imperceptive

This derailer describes executives who are not naturally inclined to read others' behavior, intent, and motivations. They might not understand others'reaction to their own behavior.

Impulsive

This derailer applies to executives who are impatient, unpredictable, and inclined to act before considering the consequences of their actions.

Perfectionistic (Micromanager)

These executives tend to micromanage. They are controlling and demanding of others.

Risk Averse

Executives with this derailer are described as indecisive, too deliberate, or reluctant to take unusual or unconventional actions. They overemphasize the prospects of failure.

Volatile

These executives have difficulty controlling their emotions. They are often moody and quick to erupt in anger.


COMPETENCIES COMMONLY related to MANAGERIAL
SUCCESS .


A. Interpersonal
Skills

1.Communicating
with Impact

2.Cultural
Interpersonal
Effectiveness

3.Customer
Orientation

4.Developing
Strategic
Relationships

5.Persuasiveness

B. Leadership skills

6. Building organizational
Talents

7.Change Leadership

8.Coaching / Teaching

9.Empowerment / Delegation

10.Influencing Others

11.Selling the vision

12. Team Development


C. Business / Management Skills

13.Business Acumen

14.Entrepreneurship

15. Establishing strategic direction

16.Global acumen

17. Managing the job.

18.Mobilizing Resources

19.Operational Decision Making

D. Personal Attributes

20. Accurate self insight

21.Adaptability

22.Driving for Results

23.Energy

24.Executive Disposition

25.Learning Orientation
26.Positive Disposition.

27.Reading the Environment

28. Valuing Diversity




Scale for evaluation.

5 Excels in all key actions; full mastery of all aspects of this competency.

4 Excels in some but not all key actions; has no significant development needs in any key actions.

3 Performs well in the more important/critical key actions; needs development in at least one or more subtle or complex key actions.

2 Performs well in some key actions but has significant development needs in at least one key action.

1 Performs adequately in basic key actions but has significant development needs in several areas.




SAJITA,

USE THE ABOVE RESOURCES, TO DESIGN A SHORT/SMART
METHOD FOR YOUR PROJECT--TUNED TO YOUR CIRCUMSTANCES.


regards

LEO LINGHAM

Dee - Member Since: Mar 2006
hi leo
i am damian, i am just searching for some topics and article on talent management as it is the topic of my project and i read the above one which is really very good. i have to do project on "Return On Investment IN THE CURRENT TALENT MANAGEMENT". i am seeking for ideas and areas which i could work, kindly suggest me something. i want some brief ideas regarding this.

thanking you

damian

leolingham2000 - Member Since: Apr 2005
To say that someone is “talented” indicates that they have an aptitude or gift enabling them to perform in an exceptional manner, relative to the rest of us. It is the job of the organization to mold individuals to maximize their potential, to help employees find their true talents and leverage them on the job, and to arm the workforce with the knowledge and skills necessary to perform in an exceptional manner. If the organization is able to accomplish this feat, it has increased the value of human capital /TALENT.

Identify Programs That Support Improvement in Human Capital/ TALENT / DEVELOPMENT.

A key exercise is to identify the key learning initiatives that support talent management and the value of human capital. There are tangible and intangible benefits of focusing on the right programs. For organizations better assimilation of people into the workforce culture is critical. Higher job performance and productivity can be seen; the organization is able to recruit, develop and retain individuals; and ultimately the greatest testimonial to a focus on talent is that the organization is profitable and has a solid position relative to competitors in the marketplace for its products and services.

Valuing Human Capital / TALENT in Theory

we need to understand how to measure and value the outcomes of increasing talent relative to human capital.

Let’s use an analogy as an example and compare it to human capital.
If an organization buys a computer for $3,000, the expectation is that the company will get $3,000 of value out of the computer. The computer may help a salesperson increase sales or help a plant floor operator increase quality, but the goal is to improve the user’s job performance through the technology. The expectation is that at least $3,000 will be gained in exchange for paying $3,000 to acquire the computer.

Now look at a person (i.e., Talent / human capital). If the fully loaded salary (wages, benefits and overtime) of a newly hired employee is $50,000, the organization paying that expense expects $50,000 of value from the employee. This value could come from the employee’s contributions in one or more key business objectives such as sales, quality, productivity, cycle time, customer satisfaction, etc. But in general, the organization expects a return of at least $50,000 from the employee.

APPLY this analysis with training. We use training to create a more talented workforce . Training and organizational development are proven tools to add knowledge and skills to our workforce. So if an employee goes to a $1,000 training event over a weeklong period, the goal is that the employee will leverage the training to help achieve various business results back on the job. Such results include increased sales, quality, customer satisfaction, productivity, etc. The expectation is that the $1,000 spent on the training will result in at least $1,000 returned in various benefits.

Looking at this analogy, we can see that the baseline value of TALENT / human capital is inherent in the fully loaded salaries of the workforce. To the extent that training can be used as a strategic tool to enhance the talent of the workforce, it also enhances the value of the human capital.

Measuring Human Capital / TALENT in Practice

So now that we have seen how TALENT/ human capital can be tagged with a monetary value, the next step is to actually measure how talent-driven training programs can be linked to the increase in human capital.
First, it goes without saying that linkage to business results is critical.
If a sales program exists, understanding how training helped increase sales would be logical. To understand the business result, isolating the change in the metrics to training is vital. Finally, adjusting your isolated result for any bias, error, confidence or conservatism is always important, especially in building credibility with stakeholders relying on the metrics for decision-making
purposes.

ROI on TALENT training relative to specific business results can be estimated.

Estimation is a process commonly used in business today.
-Salespeople estimate their future sales;
-accounting people estimate the cost that is expected in the future.
-Training personnel can also analyze the job-performance impact that a training program will have.

For example, if an employee attends sales training, one might estimate an increase in job performance, but that increase could be related to other factors, such as a competitor going out of business, that increase sales performance more than training. So estimates of performance change need to take into account many factors, not just training. Those factors include process changes, people changes, marketplace changes, technology changes and, of course, training.

When estimating the increase, the analyst should think carefully about all the factors mentioned. They may want to review historic data and forecast data to reasonably factor into their overall performance change.
Logically, the effect of training on the performance improvement is important . The next step is to isolate the estimated increase in performance to just training. In this part of the process, the analyst should estimate how much the training has influenced or will influence job performance, relative to the other factors, and assign a value to it.
Finally, because the data may be based on estimates, one must adjust any resulting metrics for this factor.
Taken together, the principles of estimation, isolation and adjustment form a powerful model in tabulating a systematic, replicable and comparable valuation model for linking training to business results. So how can it be applied to the actual valuation of human capital?
The key is to leverage estimation, isolation and adjustment to derive the change in overall job performance relative to a particular skill set.
-First, an estimate of the change is derived.
-Second, a root cause analysis is done to factor out other reasons for the change. And
-third, an adjustment factor is put in place. The resulting percentage is a monetary benefit factor that can be multiplied by the value of human capital (i.e., the fully loaded salary) to have a reasonable indicator of the increase in human capital from the talent-driven initiative relative to the base value of human capital.

Let’s drive it home with an example. Say key executives go to a leadership program. The intent is to drive various business results but also impact overall performance that encompasses many intangibles as well, such as increased communications, better delegation of tasks, more effective coaching and mentoring, etc. From a measurement perspective, the analyst should gather metric data from the participant, and possibly the participant’s manager, peers or subordinates, on job performance before versus after the training. It can be quantified in percentage terms. Second, you want to isolate the effects of training to the performance change. So you need to factor out those causes not tied to training.

The net percentage improvement in performance isolated to training, adjusted for bias and for time on the job, can be derived from this data-collection exercise. This is then multiplied by the base value of human capital as measured by the fully loaded salary for an individual. This represents an indicator for the hard and soft dollars returned to the organization as a result of leveraging training as a strategic tool to improve on-the-job performance.

ROI ON TALENT MANAGEMENT is of interest to managers who want to
know if the money they are spending on recruiting, training, succession planning
and other talent management initiatives is worthwhile.

There is a wealth of measures we could use. Simple measures
could be used.

HR ROI = (Revenue – [Expenses – Pay and Benefits])/Pay and Benefits
This is a quick measure of the earnings generated by the investment
in pay and bene. ts. So, for example, if Revenue = 1,000,000,
Expenses = 800,000 and Pay and Bene. ts = 500,000, the HR ROI
becomes 700,000/500,000. That is a ratio of 1.4 to 1, or $1.40 in
revenue for each $1.00 invested in people, pay and benefits.

There is no typical HR ROI. It varies tremendously
between industries. So, it is best used as an internal benchmark, or
where data is available, as an industry benchmark.

In the above approach ,the process is to create a strategy map and then track the elements
of human capital that are most important in driving success.


For example, create a strategy map that contains this chain:

product training >>>increased product knowledge>>>more sales.


In this case, a key human-capital measure would be an indicator of
how successful product training was at increasing product knowledge.

This approach suggests concentrating on the
elements of talent management that most impact strategy execution.
This approach, capturing metrics that are part of a chain (e.g.
increased product knowledge) leading to a strategic outcome (e.g.
more sales) is of interest to the organization

While line managers should have a good understanding of their business, they
may not have a good grasp on talent investments. The HR department must
help the line with both frameworks and specific data. There are many things HR
can help the line manager to figure out such as:
> What is the value of retention?
> Quantitatively, what is the difference between a high performer and an
average performer?
> What intangibles, such as coaching others, are important in the work?
> What is the lifecycle return on an employee? How long does it take
them to get fully up to speed?
>Is there any difference between someone with 10 years’ experience
and someone with 20 years of experience?
> What is the value of a one-standard deviation change in engagement
scores?
> What is the strategy map as it relates to talent? What are the intermediate
outputs we can assess?
> What can we learn about talent from surveys, exit interviews, conversation
and observation?

FOCUSING ATTENTION WHERE INVESTMENTS WILL HAVE
THE GREATEST IMPACT

Many organizations have good existing processes and
models for considering where the key pivot points in their strategy
execution lie. What’s missing from these standard approaches is
specifically tying in to the points where talent impacts strategy.

That’s what needs to be included.

What is really important is that the question is being asked at all.
“Given our strategy, where will we get the biggest ROI from talent?”9

That very basic issue is something management rarely investigates in
any disciplined way.

focus on is the “talent pool”—by which they mean a group of jobs such as product managers
or sales support staff. Rather than asking about HR services (“Does
our compensation program support the execution of strategy?” or
“Does our orientation program support the execution of strategy?”)
they suggest that the first question must be,

“Which talent pool should we focus our HR services on?”

the key is where the investment in talent can have the biggest
effect.

FOR DEVELOPING ROI , THE FOLLOWING ARE REQUIRED
1.STRATEGY.

2.TRAINING / DEVELOPMENT SERVICES OFFERED.

3.DELIVERABLES

4. OUTCOMES - BUSINESS IMPACT.


regards

LEO LINGHAM

Dee - Member Since: Mar 2006
hi leo thanks for previous reply.....as i am new for this topic and i have to do my project so plz guide me and plz give some information regarding evaluation of ROI in talent management thank you

PriyankaM - Member Since: Jun 2006
hey all ...im doing an assignment on Succession Planning...i made a report on it....based on the steps and basic details of it....my professor wants a more HOLISTIC view of it!!

he wants me to add the cultural and social aspect on an organisation ...and how this relates to Succession Planning!!! i need to finish this in 3-4 days!!!
ne views on how to make the report look holistic....plz lemme know!!

i'd appreciate if someone can help me!!!!!!!!

Thank u!!

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